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20 Types Of Gurdwara Goers !

Aug 29, 2010
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Perhaps we ought to combine Gyan ji's assertion with your experience Prakash ji.
Be with the Guru whilst being in a sangat. I understand sometimes it can be hard. It's easier to be with an animal or animals and with Guru at the same time than with other humans. But think of it as you next exam.

PS If you cannot be without a sangat your next exam is being with only yourself and guru.
Well it should not be taken that I may be anti-social person.I do attend all
personal and limited social functions at any of Gurdwaras in the city.
Since it is all politics in Gurdwaras So I avid being there.
I have many relatives of mine and with all I have most cordial and non controvercial relationship. I am thankful to Hari ji for such relationship.
I enjoy the company of children a lot.I devote more of my personal
time with them.I find children neutral and enjoy the real feeling of
the creation of the creator.
There was a time when I used to be introvert but now I am more extrovert than anybody else with me.
Prakash.S.Bagga
 

Luckysingh

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There was a time when I used to be introvert but now I am more extrovert than anybody else with me
That's good, there's nothing wrong with that.
-I wish that I had found myself first by being introverted instead of going out and making mistakes!
It's good to be both introverted and extroverted at some stages in your life, but probably doing the introvertedness first would be better.
 

findingmyway

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Aug 18, 2010
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World citizen!
I reckon Findingmywayji you were not amused because you secretly work for the indian movie industry or you have shares in bollywood if not an addiction to their movies!!

Lighten up, sikhs and their roots are punjabi and we should love that a little.
I took the comment as serious after weeks of being subjected to comments from Bhagat Singh ji about how wonderful Indian culture is and with anyone having another point of view being told they are talking utter nonsense. There is always good and bad and it is important NEVER to ignore this by glorifying only the good points, otherwise a community can never move forward and develop/evolve.

By emphasising the Panjabiness of Sikhism you alienate other people. I feel Sikhi is universal and should not be made more difficult for non-Panjabis. If you take the Panjab out of Sikhi, the philosophy remains unchanged.
 

Luckysingh

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Hey, no hard feelings.
We are just talking about being proud of who and what you are. It's not about endorsing how one is better than the other.
If we were negroes, I would still be proud. If I were a chinese or african I would still be proud.
Being punjabi and being proud of it, is not a sin or irrational in any way.
 

Harry Haller

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Punabi culture is about as far removed from Sikh philosophy as you could possibly get,.


I am also Punjabi, but I describe my culture as Sikh.
 
May 13, 2007
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veerji, i believe whoever comes to Gurdwara/ Guru- Dwara, sits in sangat and pangat he bcomes part of sadh sangat...for me neech sadh sang is always respectful...to me every human being have same God's spirit....If I am doing sewa at Gurdwara I wont think which type (out of above 20) he/she belongs to.....I will keep equally respecting everyone considering myself as Guru's 'sewak'

If I start thinking/deciding the 'type' of person then I am not treating all God's persons are same. Whoever keep coming to Gurdwara for whatever reason there are chances he/she will follow right path with Guru's blessing, listening bani etc;

Anyways, these are my feelings and I am at very bottom step of learning, you probably at much higher step, so veerji i am not trying to argue but to explain my simple thoughts . If I said anything wrong , bhul chuk maaf ji
 
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Aug 29, 2010
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I think it is still important to understand the meaning of the word
Gurdwaraa./Gurdware in Gurbanee

An important point for this consideration is that Sri Harmandir Sahib .

Prakash.S.Bagga
 

findingmyway

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Punabi culture is about as far removed from Sikh philosophy as you could possibly get,.


I am also Punjabi, but I describe my culture as Sikh.
Harry Veerji,
In many respects I completely agree with you. I think Panjabi culture holds a lot of Sikhs back from Sikhi. However, there are some good points in the culture so I won't write it off completely. I think the best way to evolve as individuals and as a community is to take the good parts of all cultures we are surrounded by and follow the aspects that help us live according to the principles of Gurbani (Sikh culture) :whatzpointkudi:mundahug
 
May 13, 2007
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not always, which is why Prakashji stays at home

veerji, i believe whoever comes to Gurdwara/ Guru- Dwara, sits in sangat and pangat he bcomes part of sadh sangat...for me neech sadh sang is always respectful...to me every human being have same God's spirit....If I am doing sewa at Gurdwara I wont think which type (out of above 20) he/she belongs to.....I will keep equally respecting everyone considering myself as Guru's 'sewak'

If I start thinking/deciding the 'type' of person then I am not treating all God's persons are same. Whoever keep coming to Gurdwara for whatever reason there are chances he/she will follow right path with Guru's blessing, listening bani etc;

Anyways, these are my feelings and I am at very bottom step of learning, you probably at much higher step, so veerji i am not trying to argue but to explain my simple thoughts . If I said anything wrong , bhul chuk maaf ji
 

Gyani Jarnail Singh

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Actually what Guru nanak Ji really intended was GHAR GHAR ANDER DHARAMSAAL...each SIKH Family HOME..a "Gurdwara/dharamsaal" where Sikh Values of Naam japo, KIRT Karo and wannd chhako were to be practsied ....each SIKH was actually encouraged to COOK and then Go out in the street and ANNOUNCE..Guru ka Langgar is ready JI..any and all are welcome...each SIKH was supposed to distribute SHABAD LANGGAR...read How Bhai lehnna Ji came to Guru Nanak ji..How Bhai Amardass Ji camr to Guru Anagd Ji...it was Via GUR SHABAD da Langgar being distributed by loud Paath of Japji Sahib !!!

we abdictae dour responsibility..as SIKHS left Bhai LALO behind and transformed into MALIK BHAGOS..they installed High Walls, Alarms and steel gates and kept fiercve DOGS and armed GUARDS to KEEP the "any and all" OUT !!...at a far distance...and Gurdawras became GOLUCK DARBAARS..we made the GURU a BEGGAR ( by placing a metal box in fornt of hima nd putting in COINS as in a beggars bowl...and we made sure Langgar was eaten only by wealthy SIKHS...chaisng away the genuinely poor..low down castes etc..GURDWARAS began to be RUN by PAID MERCENARIES...and Now absolute mAFIA typoes...babas sntns and cheaters molesters rapists...Malik Bhagos, Sajjan Thugghs..Kauda Raksahes...paid ragis, padi pathees, ardasses whatever...
 

Luckysingh

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Harry Veerji,
In many respects I completely agree with you. I think Panjabi culture holds a lot of Sikhs back from Sikhi. However, there are some good points in the culture so I won't write it off completely. I think the best way to evolve as individuals and as a community is to take the good parts of all cultures we are surrounded by and follow the aspects that help us live according to the principles of Gurbani (Sikh culture) :whatzpointkudi:mundahug
Now, that's a very good response that I like and totally agree with.
No matter which corner of the world we live in, we have to accept and let the cultures that are there carry on. Whilst at the same time maybe participating in the good parts and parts that are univerally acceptable.

I mean we live here in the west and we still accept and join in with the festive activities like christmas and halloween etc.. In the same manner, when some folks from western culture are living in India, then they too join in with the good parts of the culture.
I think problems arise when you try to take the complete culture with you to another corner of the world, for example.. Many punjabis try and bring as much traditional stuff from back home like attire, food, general lifestyle..etc.. BUT then they come to a clash and realise that they have to start accepting and participating in some parts of western culture such as the foods, dress and attire, lifestyle activities etc..
For instance, hardly any punjabi family with kids sticks to a pure cultural diet of roti, daal and rice etc... ALL of them will occasionaly dine out, have pizzas, burgers and popcorn.. etc...Then they also join in with the festive activities as well.

This is the way forward if you want to succeed in any part of the world.
I have some punjabi friends that live in Jamaica and they speak the local patois very well with their surrounding community. As sikhs, we have to learn to get along wth everyone even in alien environments. BUT to expect them to accept your own culture and lifestyle from back home is not going to do you any favours. You have to adapt and learn to give and take.
 

Rory

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Maybe I am a little late to reply to this, but it irritated me so that I feel obligated to reply. (Unless Bhagat-ji's post was tongue-in-cheek, in which case kindly disregard this response.)

Have you been to India? Women are living the dream. Don't have to work or work less then men and in jobs much much less dangerous, stay home with the kids, live longer, don't have to die defending the country but still get to vote, etc!
Surely you don't assume that all women are just overjoyed to get married & have nothing ahead of them until retirement except cleaning, washing, cooking & tidying, all day - every day, often times working when men are at home on holiday from work? Having little or no say in how household finances are managed? Have you ever considered that women might want to live in service to their country, or work in other "dangerous" (or should we read "un-ladylike") jobs? And are you saying that women should be glad to have voting rights after being virtually denied freedom of profession..?

Now that in itself seems like a huge problem but considering the fact that we send men and boys to wars, are more ok with them dieing because we spend less resources protecting them and towards their health...
Grown men & adolescent boys at least get a chance of coming home from a war, or of course, they can refuse to join the military. Are you saying that a newborn, innocent, defenceless baby girl's murder for backward cultural reasons is the same as that?

:whatzpointsing:
 

BhagatSingh

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Maybe I am a little late to reply to this, but it irritated me so that I feel obligated to reply. (Unless Bhagat-ji's post was tongue-in-cheek, in which case kindly disregard this response.)


Surely you don't assume that all women are just overjoyed to get married & have nothing ahead of them until retirement except cleaning, washing, cooking & tidying, all day - every day, often times working when men are at home on holiday from work? Having little or no say in how household finances are managed? Have you ever considered that women might want to live in service to their country, or work in other "dangerous" (or should we read "un-ladylike") jobs? And are you saying that women should be glad to have voting rights after being virtually denied freedom of profession..?
Rory ji, that's all well and good. Yes surely I don't assume women have it all. It was tongue-in-cheek. Women face problems in and out of the home. But I think we overlook the problem's men face and so I am dead serious about my post on the male condition, which has not changed much. It was bad to begin with and remained that way through the course of feminism.

I am presenting the male perspective here because the female perspective is already well known to a feminist society in which we live in. If you're reply to me is to simply present it again, that offers nothing to the discussion. I am not dismissing it, as I have said elsewhere that the issues of both genders must be considered when moving towards equality. But if you look closely this is not what's done. Women's issues are talked about by both men and women but men's issues are ignored or overlooked.

Now onto the specifics.

If you your response to dangerous jobs is simply to say they are "un-lady like" then you may not be aware of how dangerous jobs can really be.
wiki said:
Black lung is a legal term describing a preventable, occupational lung disease that is contracted by prolonged breathing of coal mine dust. Described by a variety of names, including miner's asthma, silicosis, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, and black lung, all are all dust diseases with the same symptoms.
work place deaths not including injuries said:
There were 1,097 Canadians killed at their place of work in 2005 according to a recent study by the Centre for the Study of Living Standards. When we take a look at who these people are, the gender trend is clear; the average rate of workplace deaths in Canada in 2005 was 30 times higher for men than women. In other words, 97 per cent of the people killed on the job were men. In actual numbers, of the 1097 reported workplace deaths in 2005, 1069 were male workers while the remaining 28 were female workers. The study also reports, the rate of workplace death is rising for men and falling for women.
http://www.kanetix.ca/ic_life_info_life_articles_30

Some of the most dangerous jobs include, logging, mining, roofing, fishing, etc. And these jobs are taken up by mostly men.
http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/the-10-most-dangerous-jobs.html

Rory said:
Grown men & adolescent boys at least get a chance of coming home from a war, or of course, they can refuse to join the military. Are you saying that a newborn, innocent, defenceless baby girl's murder for backward cultural reasons is the same as that?
You can not be serious here. Are you comparing war casualties to a few rare honour killings?

22,477,500 casualties in just world war 1!! almost all men. All your uncles, father, grandfather, nephews, brothers, their male friends. Literally an entire generation of men killed. And this is just the losses suffered on one side. Do you think they had a choice in not going to war? Recall the white feather campaign, where men who refused to join were given a white feath by a close woman, his partner or other relation. And recall, all the under aged boys who joined the military, whose recruitment was overlooked. If they hadn't gone to war, who would have protected the very civilization in which you live in? They didn't have a choice in the matter.

Heard of the draft?
http://usmilitary.about.com/cs/wars/a/draft2.htm
about.com on the draft said:
While a draft is not likely, registration for the draft (for males) is a reality. Almost all male U.S. citizens, and male aliens living in the U.S., who are 18 through 25, are required to register with Selective Service.

A man must be registered to be eligible for jobs in the Executive Branch of the Federal government and the U.S. Postal Service. This applies only to men born after December 31, 1959.

Men who are not registered with Selective Service cannot obtain Federal student loans or grants. This includes Pell Grants, College Work Study, Guaranteed Student/Plus Loans, and National Direct Student Loans.
 
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May 13, 2007
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..and Gurdawras became GOLUCK DARBAARS.....
agree jee....people keep paying good amount in goluck which is the main cause of gurdwara management dispute, e.g. election violence etc;....my understanding is if everybody stop paying in goluck probably it will help reduce/stop violence/dispute over gurdwara leadership....If people think they must have to pay something then they can decide not to pay more than 50cents.......i think if everybody sticks with this idea then its possible that so called 'managers' will stop particepating in gurdwara politics which will reduce tension between groups ....my understanding is 'goluck' is the main cause of gurdwara violence, i may be wrong but thats what i think...the hardest part is to educate people ..and to education we need right 'parchaar'......bhul chuk maaf jee
 

Harkiran Kaur

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Bhagat Singh Ji,

(I appologize since this is off topic from the original post) but I just wanted to point out that there ARE women in dangerous jobs... and I see you are in Canada as well. I, being female, serve in the Canadian Forces in the Navy. If just being in the military wasn't dangerous enough, I also volunteered for service on submarines, which is by its nature a very dangerous job, and I accept the risks involved. In fact I have been injured while serving as well requiring surgery on my shoulder.

My life has much more meaning to me since I am serving my country, than if I was just a housewife cooking and cleaning all day. In fact, I doubt I could live like that - I'd always feel trapped. That's not to say that I don't clean and cook etc as I live alone right now and take pride in my place, and also hope to be married in the future, but the man I hope to be married to someday accepts me for who I am (and I only have 4 years left until I finish my 20 year contract in the military). When I am done in the military, I plan to become a civillian paramedic, also a semi-high risk job....

And again (to stay on topic) I still suggest Type 21: The Gori/Gora Sikh :) But I am too busy at the Gurdwara being lost in the moment and connecting to Waheguru through doing seva, the beautiful kirtan etc, to even notice the types of Gurdwara Goers anyway. I go to there for my spiritual growth, and while there, I focus only on that!
 

BhagatSingh

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Bhagat Singh Ji,

(I appologize since this is off topic from the original post) but I just wanted to point out that there ARE women in dangerous jobs... and I see you are in Canada as well. I, being female, serve in the Canadian Forces in the Navy. If just being in the military wasn't dangerous enough, I also volunteered for service on submarines, which is by its nature a very dangerous job, and I accept the risks involved. In fact I have been injured while serving as well requiring surgery on my shoulder.

My life has much more meaning to me since I am serving my country, than if I was just a housewife cooking and cleaning all day. In fact, I doubt I could live like that - I'd always feel trapped. That's not to say that I don't clean and cook etc as I live alone right now and take pride in my place, and also hope to be married in the future, but the man I hope to be married to someday accepts me for who I am (and I only have 4 years left until I finish my 20 year contract in the military). When I am done in the military, I plan to become a civillian paramedic, also a semi-high risk job....

And again (to stay on topic) I still suggest Type 21: The Gori/Gora Sikh :) But I am too busy at the Gurdwara being lost in the moment and connecting to Waheguru through doing seva, the beautiful kirtan etc, to even notice the types of Gurdwara Goers anyway. I go to there for my spiritual growth, and while there, I focus only on that!
Wonderful Akasha ji,
I think that's awesome! I knew a woman from the military who had come to Toronto to complete a degree in the sciences, after which she wanted to find the love of her life and settle down.

I want to ask you something which never occurred to me when I met her. Would you marry a man who would do the housework and take care of the kids, whilst you go out and earn the money for the family?
 

Harkiran Kaur

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Wonderful Akasha ji,
I think that's awesome! I knew a woman from the military who had come to Toronto to complete a degree in the sciences, after which she wanted to find the love of her life and settle down.

I want to ask you something which never occurred to me when I met her. Would you marry a man who would do the housework and take care of the kids, whilst you go out and earn the money for the family?
I moreso believe that housework and raising of kids should be 50/50 - especially if both people have careers (which these days is the norm since cost of living is so high) I don't think either partner should be saddled with the full load of cleaning and cooking and changing of diapers.

I know that while we make ok income in the military, it's barely enough to live off in today's society, so it would be hard if I was the only one working. Having said that, I know that I make more than a lot of people do, so if my husband was out of work, I would not mind if he cleaned and took care of things in the house while I was at work. But ultimately, the ideal now days is for both people to work to bring in enough income to live comfortably, and in that case the housework should be the responsibility of both.

And even in cases where one parent stays home to raise the child (male or female) I think the other spouse should at least do SOME of the chores, because the one staying home with the kids would actually be working 24/7 without any breaks while the one working would have an 8 hr (or however long their shift is) break from it every day!! I know a few of my friends were single Mothers and they found it extremely difficult without any time to themselves at all!

So to answer your question, yes I would be ok with him staying home... but the goal would be for both to work (or have a business or something at least) to augment income - this is the necessity in this day and age unfortunately. And then, the houswework would be 50/50
 

BhagatSingh

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Apr 25, 2006
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Yeah Akasha ji,
Understandable. It is definitely not easy to support a family with one person's income, unless they are making a decent 6 figure salary.

Also like you say I think a child should have involvement with both his/her mother and his/her father, to grow up to be a healthy adult.

Anyways great to see you in a turban too. Let's get off this subject and get back to 22 Types of Gurudwara Goers.
 

Ambarsaria

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Dec 21, 2010
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Bhagat Singh ji just a thought.
... Let's get off this subject and get back to 22 Types of Gurudwara Goers.
There are as many types of Gurdwara goers as the number of people who ever went to a Gurdwara lol. I have seen hundreds of thousands different types. It is all genetic.

Sometimes we wear khopey/deflectors so that our eyes may not see all that is unique in everyone.

Sat Sri Akal.
 

BhagatSingh

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Apr 25, 2006
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Haha very true!


  • On one hand there is only 2 types of persons who go to the gurudwara, the one who goes to the gurudwara and the one who doesn't.
  • This article describes as many as 20 types of people that go to the gurudwara, with additions made by fellow members.
  • And you remind us that everyone is different thus there are as many types as there are people.
  • One might say only a human can go to a gurudwara, thus there is only 1 type.
  • Another might break down our beliefs about going to a gurudwara, that the experience is no different to walking into other social functions, where community rituals are being carried out. Thus no one is going anywhere, merely participating in activities which they can do anywhere. The building is a superficial construct.

And thus one can see that going to a gurudwara is a lesson in world religions... ;)
 

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