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Why Are We Not Allowed To Cut Hair When It's Ok To Cut Nails, Since Both Are Created By God?

Bmandur

SPNer
May 15, 2008
198
235
Canada
Re: Why are we allowed to cut nails but not hair?

Tejwant Ji,

I understand the difference. There is none. Term Home Sapiens refers to Humans.
Anyways, if you are referring to all pre-historic humans, the answer is that, as far as we know, they didn't cut their nails or their hair. They didn't use toilet paper either.
Can I respectfully ask you, what was the point of this question?

Well, something with sound reasoning and logic. Preferably factual logic.

Something like this:-
Question:- Why do metals conduct electricity efficiently?
Answer:- Because they have free electrons due to larger nucleus.

Question:- Why do we take antibiotics when sick?
Answer:- Because antibiotics kill disease causing bacteria.

Something that does NOT involve "Because that's the way it is", "Because that's what our ancestors did", "Because our hair capture spiritual energy!" or "Because ghosts live in our hair who will come out if we cut them!"

Obviously I cut nails. But we both understand what my question means. Why is it wrong to cut hair when it is ok to cut nails since both are part of God gifted 'Roop'. That's what I am seeking an answer for.

Again, nails are also part of the natural way, the way we were created. This does not answer my question.

Now statements like these make me upset. First of all I never said I am unable to work. I just said I have to be more cautious. I am doing research in microelectronic applications specific to telecom. That's why I had specifically referred to semiconductor wafers in my earlier post. When working with microelectronics, all sources of dust need to be covered. Unless you are bald, you have to wear a special cap. And unless you are clean shaven, you have to wear surgical mask or something similar. Since my beard captures significant dust, I wear a mask in lab. You mention Intel. I regularly visit labs of many major chip manufacturers like STM, Freescale, AMD and Intel.

So don't assume stuff. I am NOT "wrong". You are.

I get this. And I respect it. But if this is the only reason for keeping hair then all we are trying to do is 'look different' from Hindus and look similar to Mughal emperors. And since we don't have Mughals or Brahmins wearing turbans anymore, how is this relevant today?

There are many more kinds of skepticism including Philosophical skepticism and Political skepticism. But a skeptic is a skeptic. One who critically thinks about all things before accepting any concept. And it is in no way a negative trait. It only makes you stronger in your beliefs since you have actually examined them instead of taking someone's word for it. So to answer your question I am a skeptic. The only kind and all kind.

Let me be honest. Inspite of being a Gursikh so far, my faith in our religion isn't as strong as it used to be. Reason being, everytime I question a reason behind a religious belief, be it wearing a 'kada' or keeping the kesh, it always comes down to "Because that's the way it is" and "That's what our ancestors did". It used to be good enough for me when I was a kid but not any longer.

I hope you understand the source of my frustration and I truly hope someone can answer my original question!

Best Regards


I know one thing with Nails on your hand you wipe off your extra food from back **** and we eat with our hand so you do not want Extra smelly garbage to get stuck in your nails and eat the smelly extra waste food with your Food With Feet's nails we walk to the washroom for drop our extra food from you know
Sorry but these are the the facts plain & Simple with Nails

For Hair look what My guru says In Guru Granth Sahib jee

Page 74, Line 9

ਮੈਗੁਰਮਿਲਿਉਚਦੁਮਾਲੜਾ
मैगुरमिलिउचदुमालड़ा॥

Mai gur mil ucẖ ḏumālṛā.
I met with the Guru, and I have tied a tall, plumed
turban

Page 330, Line 2

ਜਿਹਸਿਰਿਰਚਿਰਚਿਬਾਧਤਪਾਗ
जिहसिरिरचिरचिबाधतपाग॥

Jih sir racẖ racẖ bāḏẖaṯ pāg.
That head which was once embellished with the finest
turban

Page 470, Line 17
ਦੁਇਧੋਤੀਬਸਤ੍ਰਕਪਾਟੰ
दुइधोतीबसत्रकपाटं॥

Ḏu▫e ḏẖoṯī basṯar kapātaʼn.
upon your head is a
turban, and you wear two loin cloths

Page 727, Line 17
ਖੂਬੁਤੇਰੀਪਗਰੀਮੀਠੇਤੇਰੇਬੋਲ
खूबुतेरीपगरीमीठेतेरेबोल॥

Kẖūb ṯerī pagrī mīṯẖe ṯere bol.
How handsome is your
turban! And how sweet is your speech

Page 1084, Line 9
ਨਾਪਾਕਪਾਕੁਕਰਿਹਦੂਰਿਹਦੀਸਾਸਾਬਤਸੂਰਤਿਦਸਤਾਰਸਿਰਾ੧੨
नापाकपाकुकरिहदूरिहदीसासाबतसूरतिदसतारसिरा॥१२॥

Nāpāk pāk kar haḏūr haḏīsā sābaṯ sūraṯ ḏasṯār sirā. ||12||
Purify what is impure, and let the Lord's Presence be your religious tradition. Let your total awareness be the
turban on your head.
 
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Seeker9

Cleverness is not wisdom
SPNer
May 2, 2010
652
980
UK
Sadh Sangat Ji


This is an extremely interesting thread and raises questions, answers to which cannot be given in brief posts. A book can be written upon the topic. One will need to go back in history and ask why did pious individuals of all faiths (Yogis, Imams, Mullas, Sidhs, Christian saints and others) adorn hair. Christ, Mohammed, Moses, Vashist, Janak, Vishvamitra, all characters from Ramyana and Mahabharata and many more displayed head and facial hair. The fact that in modern day drama and films, Shri Krishan and Shri Ram are shown clean shaven is just an expression of contemporary human vanity – they too were like all the other sages with flowing head and facial hair. The great philosophers and scientists from the past, too, grew beards, e.g. Bernard Shaw, Galileo.

QUOTE]


Dear Rajinder Singh ‘Arshi’ Ji



I too have learned a lot from this thread including your detailed post


Your observation above about great past enlightened teachers and their common appearance merits further discussion as I think it will ultimately provide some answers to the question posed in the title of this thread


I think you already touched on the message of saintliness ...the enlightened ones had let go of their egos and vanity and were only interested in their spiritual endeavours. So by observing this today, Sikhs can make a similar statement that they place their spiritual progress over and above their ego and vanity



Others have touched on nature and what is natuexral appearance so why go against that


I am content with those possible answers


But I will nonetheless introduce a third off the wall explanation here as well....perhaps there is some metaphysical explanation that long hair is actually in some way beneficial to meditation and spiritual travel? I googled this and came across some interesting info


Maybe that's another reason why throughout the ages, the great spiritual figures have not had shaved heads and faces...well at least all the ones I can think of anyway!


And it could also explain the distinction between not cutting hair but cutting nails


:redturban:
 
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Seeker9

Cleverness is not wisdom
SPNer
May 2, 2010
652
980
UK
Source:- Dictionary.com

justification - 4 dictionary results
jus·ti·fi·ca·tion   /ˌdʒʌstəfɪˈkeɪʃən/ Show Spelled[juhs-tuh-fi-key-shuhn]
–noun
1. a reason, fact, circumstance, or explanation


Wow, talk about making a fool of himself. :) Lol... This should go on digg.com
This guy is some sort of a literary genius. Somebody get him the Trudeau scholarship for Oxford. Or whatever is the equivalent for Harvard.


I have been following this thread for couple of days since I had similar questions. Actually not about the nails.....primarily only about the hairs.
Never really thought of creating a acct but the above literary gem was too funny to pass.

Guys, keep up the lively discussion.

Actually I want to share my point of view too. I'll probably post something over the weekend.


I think we should all have a bit more respect for each other and be prepared to learn from each other and acknowledge the learning

I have been reading the same posts as well and do not agree with your conclusion
 
Sep 8, 2010
70
74
Los Angeles
This guy is some sort of a literary genius. Somebody get him the Trudeau scholarship for Oxford. Or whatever is the equivalent for Harvard.


Harryputtar89,

Please refrain from making such comments about anyone as it only helps in raising the tempers and doesn't really help the discussion itself.

Another thing I would like to add here, since you seem to be couple of years younger than me is that I am asking these questions just because I need guidance. I don't want you or anyone else to get influenced in any way because of my curiosity.
If you have enough faith to walk the path of being a Khalsa, then nothing like it. In fact I feel envious of people who can keep their faith intact without questioning it. I wish I had that much faith, and one less thing to worry about.

Once again, if you have something constructive to offer, do chime in. But please don't mock others.

Regards.
 

karam

SPNer
Aug 11, 2010
32
54
I think the reason behind keeping your hair is spiritual reason, all the great Gurus, bhagats, avtaras,rishis of the world had long hair, eventhough they were not sikhs, you eat with your hands so its important to cut your nails to maintain hygiene, obviously hair do not serve no such purpose, I could be wrong I think for spiritual life you need hair, I came across some information on enlightened saints and it seemed to me in the advanced stages of spirituality you japp naam with every rom of your body, so I think it has something to do with spirituality, spiritual people kept uncut hair even before sikh gurus, on the other hand I also feel if you want to cut your hair from the core of your heart but you are forced to keep uncut hair then you are doing a drama of being a puran sikh
 
Sep 8, 2010
70
74
Los Angeles
Tejwant Ji,

You call my questions a pony trick but you don't realize that this question is very important specially to youngsters because it effects each and every one of us at a very personal level specially to kids during their formative years when they are looking to forge their life long identities. Since they are in school, they don't have enough time or resources to do in depth study of our religion on their own. So they resort to next best thing which is to ask questions from supposedly learned people. But people like you mock them. You don't realise that your mockery is hurtful and disrespectful to them and their intelligence.


As, I suggested in my earlier post, you should get your hair cut and see how you feel and then go from there.

Seriously, if your own son asked you this question, would your answer still be the same to cut his hair and see how it feels?
If not then why are you trying to misguide me? Now don't even try to say that yes you will tell your own child to cut his hair too just to find out how he feels. You know you won't do that. You have continued to mock me all through this thread. I thought being a senior member of the forum you would be helping the young and curious minds. But all you do is make fun and misguide them. When you start your suggestions with such wrong comments, it muddies even the rest of your suggestion. But in spite of that I will start listening to Gurbani as you said, if not for answers, then at least for spiritual growth.


Many other members out here had their doubts about my intention and probably still do. But you were the only one who by yourself decided firmly what my intentions were. In your very first post you declared that I wasn't looking for answers to satisfy me. In your very first post on this thread you said to me :-
You know very well that there is no answer that can satisfy you

How do you reach such far fetched conclusions about me when you don't know me and that too in your very first post.

Having doubts is one thing but the way you behaved isn't called being skeptical. It's called being dogmatic.

After few more posts you went ahead and asked me to get my hair cut. You even suggested a barber shop -'Super Cuts.' Amazing!
You did all this, in spite of me repeatedly pleading with you that I am not trying to justify cutting my hair and am only trying to justify keeping them. I kept beseeching you just to not belittle my intentions and help me with my question. But to no avail.


People like you are the reason why youngsters are running away from Religion
and faith. You don't really care to listen what kids are asking and you just assume that we are up to no good. You don't know me. What gives you the right to say what my intentions are?

You assumed from your very first post that I was here for sinister reasons. You never really paid attention to what I said. You were always trying to read between the lines in my posts and belittle my intentions.

I thought that since you were one of the senior contributors on this forum, and almost my father's age, you would have something to offer. But you couldn't even get through your perceived notion of what you thought my intent was!

All other senior members like Mai Harinder Kaur ji, Bhagat Singh Ji, Jyot Ji, Arshi ji, Maninder Singh Ji, Randip Ji, Seeker9 and many others presented their views with much grace. Even if my views and their views didn't reconcile, in most cases we gracefully agreed to disagree.

If I decide to continue to maintain my Sikh identity, when I have kids, and they ask me questions about my religion, I would make sure they stay away from dogmatic people like you who can't get over their pre conceived notions and push the kids further away.

I have nothing to discuss with you, since you have nothing to offer
except your questions about my intent. Don't bother responding to me anymore. I would rather talk to other senior people on this forum.


Thanks and best regards. Hope you have a nice weekend!



To All Others:-
I would be traveling for most of the coming week. Obviously no one cares about the two days old skeptic member. But just wanted to let everyone know since I might not be able to respond in timely manner. Specially to so many wonderful posts in last 24 hrs, to which I surely want to respond.
 

findingmyway

Writer
SPNer
Aug 17, 2010
1,665
3,778
World citizen!
An interesting observation:
Scientists and people close to nature often have long hair. I'm sure it's subconcsious and that to me says a lot about the meaning of hair (even though we may not realise it on a conscious level).

In the movie avatar, the hair was given a very big significance as it was the way the inhabitants of Pandora bonded with those around them and with the environment. I know it's fiction but seen as the film was made by people who cut their hair, I think it says a great deal about the subconscious meaning of hair to us as human beings. I feel the only reason cutting hair has become popular is through advertising and 'beauty' magazines affecting the way society thinks. Historically people (esp those in power/upper classes) loved long hair :veryhappykaur:
 
Nov 14, 2004
408
388
63
Thailand
Dear skeptic.freethinker1,

Quote:
<<You call my questions a pony trick but you don't realize that this question is very important specially to youngsters because it effects each and every one of us at a very personal level specially to kids during their formative years when they are looking to forge their life long identities. Since they are in school, they don't have enough time or resources to do in depth study of our religion on their own. So they resort to next best thing which is to ask questions from supposedly learned people. >>

First of all, when I was your age, I never had any instances of clear thinking. Indeed even now at more than twice your age, unlike you, I am generally so muddle-headed that at times I’m drawn to conclude that I must have only half a brain. However in spite of this, there may be something that you could learn from what I have to say.

When I was young, I too was tempted to cut my hair but my reason however, was mostly the outer appearance. There was fear of displeasing my parents but also that in fact if I did cut my hair, I may end up exposing an even uglier ‘actual appearance’, and so I decided that better this remain hidden underneath the outer distractions of hair, turban and beard. :-(

Later I would have ended up doing it anyway, after also taking into account such things as discomfort and inconvenience. However by then, not only there was fear, but mingled with this, also some respect for my parents. Besides, the young person’s idealistic thoughts about how I should not give in to the expectations of a society that tends to mock and look down upon Sikhs and other similar minority groups, was quite a strong motivation. Related to this were such thoughts as, “I must have good enough reason for cutting my hair” or “Why I should be other than who I am?” which in fact were the main driving force for the position being maintained up until quite recently.

Now of course, these questions do not arise. But still if I did not have a family to think about, I’d just shave and go around bald. This of course has nothing to do with any aim to develop wisdom and other good qualities; in fact it would likely condition some attachment, but surely one not worse than if I continued to maintain my hair. The implication here is that the interest in developing understanding has its causes completely unrelated to whether I have long hair or am completely bald. I think this is very important to note. In other words, thoughts about keeping hair in the context of developing good qualities, is I believe, very misleading. Those who try to justify by giving such reasons as done here, are in my opinion, just increasing their ignorance and attachments and moving even more away from the ideals set and wish to move towards.

I have young children, both boys. Soon they’d be faced with the kind of situation, as you say, most youngsters face. My wife is a devout Sikh and so my children would know not to even question such things in front of her. I of course, would rather have them cut their hair, knowing that they don’t possess the kind of understanding which would allow them not to react to societal influences negatively leading them to then end up suppressing much and thereby accumulating more bad than any good.

There is quite a bit of discrimination against Sikhs here in Thailand as it is anywhere outside of Punjab, but this is not the reason why any Sikh should then decide to cut his hair, but then again, the reason for keeping it must have a basis in what is good and right. For example, I would try to teach my children about the value of kindness and respect (towards her mother in this context) hence reason not to give in to temptation to cut their hair. However, even this can’t be forced and I’d need to remind myself of the Middle Way.

Indeed in light of this latter concept, the teachings on the harm of lying, stealing, sexual misconduct, killing and taking of intoxicants, is put forward as “training rules” and not as commandments. The idea is that while one sees the truth in principle, about the harm in these five kinds of actions, in practice however, without wisdom being developed along side, one ends up following rules with a mind often more harmful than that which one thinks to refrain from. In other words it is better to end up making mistakes now and then with regard to these five actions, than to make those that are worse but hidden by the ‘self image’ invariably resulted.

Now, restraint from lying, stealing, sexual misconduct and killing are not doubt good since they are indeed right causes leading to corresponding results. But even here as explained above, the likelihood of going about them wrongly, such as when seeing them as commandments to follow rather than something which requires understanding is always there. When it comes to such things as maintaining long hair however, where is there any good being pointed at?!

So perhaps you should begin by separating the issue of hair and its place in your work from religious considerations. Indeed you wouldn’t even have to think then, in terms of being a skeptic and free thinker, because as far as I’m concerned, this is another unnecessary burden that you are carrying. If good has been got from your following Guru Nanak’s teachings, there is no reason that you would not continue to learn more. It is hard for parents to be convinced by their children’s reasoning especially when it comes to the matter of religion. But I suggest that you try to discuss with them with respect, creating an atmosphere in which they will trust you in your ability to discriminate rightly what is good from what isn’t.
 
Sep 8, 2010
70
74
Los Angeles
Dear Confused,

It was a wonderful post. I really appreciate how you acknowledged the practical problems faced by sikh youngsters nowdays, specially the ones growing up outside India.
This understanding might seem natural to you, but it is indeed not so common. Congrats for being an understanding father. Your kids are indeed lucky.

There are parts of your post that I didn't fully agree with or probably didn't understand, maybe because I went through it pretty quickly. I will surely like to discuss with you some points when I am not so pressed for time.

Once again, thanks for your response.

Best Regards.
 
Nov 14, 2004
408
388
63
Thailand
skeptic.freethinker1,

Dear Confused,

This understanding might seem natural to you, but it is indeed not so common. Congrats for being an understanding father. Your kids are indeed lucky.


I appreciate your saying this, however I don’t think that it correctly reflects the situation. There is no doubt that I am not a good father, being that I am more often than not quite impatient with my children. It would seem that I don’t realize that I too was a child once and made many similar mistakes as they do, or perhaps even more. I’d rather be left alone most of the time and so hardly spend any time talking to my children, or wife for the matter, which is probably due to self-centeredness. Of course I’m very attached to them, but then as we all know, this is all about me and my feelings and is the very reason the anger keeps arising when expectations are not met. Sometimes I am even lead to think along the lines that the people who are dependent on me, the associated karma must not be very good, else they’d have ended up in a better family.

But of course, I have no guilt feelings since such things are not within anyone’s control. And although I do have many, many bad qualities and characteristic traits, one thing I’m quite confident about is that I rightly see the importance of developing such things as generosity, truthfulness, kindness, morality and other good qualities and most of all wisdom on one hand, and on the other, seeing harm in greed, hatred and other bad qualities most notably of which is ignorance. With this all I can hope is that my children will somehow also learn to appreciate these same qualities. In fact recently while talking to someone about the difficult financial situation and little hope that my children will receive any kind of inheritance, I remarked that if they were to become good and know who they are, even if financially they remained poor, I’d consider my duty as a father well done.

But there is no saying that this will happen. I think that it is easier to become a Bill Gates, Obama and an Einstein all in one, than to put someone on the correct path to right-understanding, one who does not have any inclination for it. Indeed, when I was writing my last response to you, one thought that came to my mind was that, “my children, even if they may in the end fail to appreciate these things, it would be good that this young man (meaning you) did.” ;-)
 

Seeker9

Cleverness is not wisdom
SPNer
May 2, 2010
652
980
UK
Dear Skeptic.Freethinker Ji

I can't help feeling you are being a bit harsh about our respected colleague on this forum

Yes, you have been challenged and that can be part of the process when trying to get to the bottom of things

I now believe your enquiry is genuine and look forward to continuing your discussion when you come back

In the meantime have a safe journey and return
:blueturban:
 
Sep 8, 2010
70
74
Los Angeles
Seeker9 ji,
Yes. Almost as harsh as asking someone to goto Supercuts just for asking questions.

Sorry for short and curt reply but I am limited by the small keyboard of my iPhone.

Thanks for your wishes.

Regards
 

findingmyway

Writer
SPNer
Aug 17, 2010
1,665
3,778
World citizen!
Nails are free to cut once you have a cutter. Just think how much money you save by not going to the hairdressers! :}8-: Please say that made you laugh....


Dear skeptic.freethinker1 ji,

Hope you had a good trip.

Asking questions is good. Sikhi encourages it. I don't think we should follow blindly especially when there are so many controversies surrounding us and quite frankly I think there are very few people nowadays who have not asked the exact same question you have asked here at some point. If we understand we are more likely to want to follow. The kind of scientific justification you are looking for doesn't exist at this moment in time. You've got several reasons for why cutting nails is ok. However, as far as keeping hair goes, the crux of the matter becomes commitment. If you have the love for Sikhi then these questions become irrelevant. Please bear with me while I explain as I can only do so by referring to personal experience.

I was bullied for the 1st 7 years of my school life, initially it was racial then others jumped on the bandwagon. So i went through a phase where I refused to believe in God as why would God be so evil to put me through that. A lot more happened in my life and thankfully my faith returned. However, I was not satisfied. I saw a lot that didn't make sense in the religious community and the world around me and I didn't know what to make of things. I started going off Sikhi and wanted to cut my hair again-I had faith in God but not in religion. I resisted the urge for my parents sake and slowly started connecting with the Guru Granth Sahib Ji. I attended a couple of camps which helped immensely but was still not completely satisfied. Then sometime ago I moved to a place where I found the sangat I was looking for-Waheguru heard my ardas. A sangat that gave me the courage to trust my skills in my Gurmukhi to connect me the Guru Granth Sahib completely. A sangat that would answer my questions and encouraged me to question more. A sangat that heard my concerns about double standards and felt the same way so tried to do something about it. A sangat that helped me fall in love with the Guru completely, totally and utterly. A sangat that showed me we can aim to live true Gursikh lives even today. Unfortunately it has been an uphill struggle since leaving there as I see so much that doesn't work the way it should around me. However, in my love I'm determined. It has taken some time for my family to accept that I won't remove the kesh on my legs anymore-a big deal for a female. It's a pain when going to hot countries as I can't wear shorts and it's a pain when swimming but since I'm not self conscious about it anymore I find more acceptance among others even if they don't agree or understand. I stopped wearing earrings as I realised piercing is also wrong as it also distorts the body given to us by God. This is also a big deal for a female especially in Panjabi culture where looking good is the be all and end all for women-everyone judges on looks.

What I'm trying to say is that these things can't be forced on you. They are not essential for spirituality but are essential for a Gursikh way of life. I knew the logic behind them before but was only able to follow through when I had love for Sikhi and everything it stood for. Until you have that feeling inside then there will always be doubt in your mind. Once you have that love/yearning for the Guru then the need to keep your hair will come from inside.

First thing to do is to try and connect with the Guru itself. Forget what you see/hear in the community and study the Guru Granth Sahib Ji for yourself. I've attached a document about Nankian philosophy I got from another thread and have been really impressed by (I'm still working through it). I hope that provides you with a good starting point. Try and get onto a Sikhi camp if you can (choose carefully) as its a great way to get connected with other Gursikhs. Get involved in local projects if there are any. Do seva (any form-not just in Gurdwara). Read directly from the Granth Sahib if you can as its a special feeling. Give it time-nothing happens overnight! If after a few years you're still feeling lost then maybe it's time to rethink. Try not to get sidetracked by pakhandis around even though there are plenty and instead focus on the Guru.

Apologies for such a long post-wasn't sure my point would come across otherwise. I earnestly wish you lots of luck and hope you find what you're looking for. Take a step towards Ik Oankar and he will guide you further. Most of all don't lose hope!

Best wishes,
Jasleen icecreamkauricecreammundaicecreamkudi
 

Attachments

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skeptic.freethinker1 Ji,

One thing which i felt but never shared to anyone since i joined SPN is, here most of the questions of Why/What/When/Where etc are asked by people living in foreign countries as they seek reason for everything they are asked to do. Somewhere its good as knowing/asking the reason is a good thing. And its obvious that whatever Guruji asked us to do, have reason(s) irrespective of the fact that we know or not. Even I never questioned my parents for the same. May be bcoz of lack of 'Why/What/When/Where' kind of thinking or a little awareness that Guruji cannot be wrong in any case. As Sant Singh Ji Maskeen used to explain, Gyan and Shardha are the main ingredients for Enlightenment. Having only one will lead u NOWHERE. Personally I feel Shardha is more important and then comes the Gyan as Gurbani says "Jin Prem Kio Tin Hi Prabh Paayo" (quoted earlier, also) Looking at the other side of coin, I personally feel and has observed that Shardha or Prem is also achieved by His Grace only.

Thats personal thinking and I don't claim that it ought to be right as I'm still learning. Here is the logic i have found for ur question. I read it and was impressed.

Human Hair - A Biological Necessity
By Dr. Birendra Kaur

Hair is a characteristic feature of mammals, commonly known as "Hairy quadrupeds" - a group of animals that mark the climax of evolution. Mammals are also the dominant animals in the world today, due partly to their ability to regulate body temperature in the face of variations in environmental temperature. This requires regulation of heat production and heat loss by the body. Hair plays an important role in regulating heat loss from the body. Impulses from the brain (hypothalamus) causes the hair to stand on ends, thereby enclosing an insulating layer of air just outside the skin. This layer reduces the loss of heat by radiation.

Man marks the climax of evolution even among mammals, and has the most complex and highly developed brain, and the longest hair on head. This feature cannot be without reason. It cannot be a matter of mere chance or a mistake by nature, because if the tails has been lost the hair too could have been lost. On the contrary, human head-hair has increased manifold as compared to other mammals.

This dense and long growth of hair on the head shows that the body is trying to increase the surface area for some particular function. Such a trend to increase the surface area is seen in every system of the body, e.g. the highly coiled intestines with finger-like villi on their inner surfaces for absorption of digested food; alveoli in the lungs for exchange of O2 and CO2; glomerular capillaries in the form of bunch and coiled tubules in the kidneys where urine formation takes place. The circulatory and nervous systems show extensive branching to reach every nook and corner of the body. Even the surface of the human brain has maximum fissures (folds) corresponding to its increased abilities. The results that will be produced by decreasing the surface area of these points is easy for all to imagine!

FUNCTIONS OF HAIR: Hair performs a variety of functions. Some are listed below:

Form an insulating coat on the body. Trap a layer of still air just outside the skin, and thereby reduce loss of heat by radiation.
Absorb harmful radiations from the sun.
Keep out co{censored} dust particles, as in eyelashes, hair in the nasal chambers and ear canals.
Eyebrows prevent water or perspiration from falling into eyes, due to their particular direction.
Axillary and pubic hair lessen friction between limbs and body, and between limbs during locomotion.
Axillary hair provide large surface area for evaporation of sweat.
Beautify the body (otherwise why people do not shave off their hair from the head completely; bald men are desperate and would pay any price to get back hair on their heads).
Beard and moustaches are for differentiation of sex. Mostly males are decorated in nature, e.g. lion, pea{censored} and other birds, deer, etc.
Protect from sun and rain.
Prevent water from entering into skin.
Impart colour to body.
Vibrissae are sensory hair, tactile in nature and useful in dark burrows.
Defend the body in danger, by standing on their ends, thereby making the body look bigger.
Help to disguise by blending with the colour of the surroundings, to escape the watchful eyes of natural enemies.

IS HAIR LIFELESS?

Hair is erroneously considered lifeless because of lack of any visible connection with the brain. But, the drain is not controlling/communicating with our body through nerves alone. Hormones, which are chemical mediators also regulate various body functions. The immune system of the body fights infection with the help of coordinated action of cells, which have no visible connection with each other, or with the brain. So, presence or absence of nerves alone cannot determine the connection of a particular part of the body with the brain. If the hair was really dead to the brain, how then does it come to know that it has been cut, and respond by growing it again to the specific length? Once the specific length has been attained, further lengthening ceases. Thus, undoubtedly the brain is well aware of the condition of the hair, cut or uncut, even upto its tip! This is a sure sign of life. Also, the hair, like any other living organ of the body, responds to ageing, in their length, thickness of growth and greying. The condition of the health of a person is also reflected in the hair, its lustre, shine, etc.

Lack of sensation in hair, is no indication of its being dead, for, even the brain shows no such sensation. There is also a phylum (Porifera), the animals of which do not possess a nervous system at all. A blow to any part of their body produces no response whatsoever. Do we call these animals dead? Most plants do not show any sensation either.

Further, a part of that we call "dead" may be without sensation but definitely not without function. Rather, its function is as important as any living part of the body, if not more. For example:

What would be the fate of an egg without the shell?
What would be the condition of the body's living cells without the covering of the dead cells, i.e. upper layers of skin?
How can teeth perform their function without enamel?
What life would a bird lead without feathers?
How would many freshwater animals overcome unfavourable conditions and not become extinct without cysts?
How would plants disperse and reproduce without formation of seeds?
Actually, different parts of the body or different cells cannot be categorised as useful/not useful. Each is only specially modified to perform different function for the benefit of the same individual. What the cells of a kidney can do, the cells of pancreas cannot. That does not mean that the former are more important than the latter, or vice versa.

HAIR VS. NAILS:

It is often argued that hair and nails are similar, and a question frequently asked: "If we should not cut our hair, then why do we cut our nails?" But even a superficial study of the two shows them to be extremely different from each other. Whereas the hair grows from a tubular pit, the hair follicle, formed by sinking in of the most actively dividing layer of the skin, i.e., stratum germinativum, into the lower dermis, the nails are only modifications of the upper dead layers of the skin, i.e. stratum corneum. Further, the base of every follicle bulges out forming an inverted cup, which receives blood capillaries for nourishment and nerve fibres that make the hair sensitive to contact. An oil gland, known as sebaceous gland, opens into every hair follicle, the secretion of which lubricates the hair. A muscle is also attach ed to the base of every hair for bringing about movement. Pigments are added to the shaft of the hair as it grows. None of these features is associated with nails.

Structurally also hair is extremely strong, and resists breaking due to its elasticity and flexibility. Hair is as strong as steel, if we compare the two of the same diameter. Nails, on the other hand, are very brittle and rigid, breaking off easily. Hair number in thousands, thereby increasing the surface area, as if to meet a specific requirement. Nails number only twenty.

The difference between the two do not end with the structural features. Even the body's response towards the two is totally different. Our body, throughout life, tries to maintain a particular length of hair, and if cut anywhere along the length, responds by growing them again to the specific length. It clearly indicates the link of the body with the hair all along its length.

The body shows no such response to the nails, which grow from birth to death at the same rate, irrespective of whether cut or not. As has been mentioned earlier, even the shafts of hair, like any other living organ of the body, respond to ageing (in their length, density of growth, greying, etc.) and condition of health is reflected in the person?s hair (in their lustre, shine, etc.), whereas from the dead part of the nail, one can infer no such thing.

Practically also, hair do not interfere in any daily activity, whereas it is impossible to function at all with long nails. And even if not cut, nails generally fall off of their own easily; rather it takes great effort to maintain them, even upto a short length. In contrast to the long list of the functions of hair, only one function can be attributed to nails - that is, protection of the tips of digits.

CONCLUSION:

To sum up, if there is anything on the head that can be compared with nails, it is dandruff!

It is also argued that hair have been lost from the body in man, because the body is kept covered. If that be the case, then the axillary and the pubic hair should have been the first to go. Also, the hair on the face, neck and hands should have remained.

Nature knows best what to discard or retain. Whatever is retained is not without purpose. If we are unable to explain something, it does not mean it has no significance. We must look for an explanation, rather than deny the role or existence of something we do not see.

There are sound frequencies we do not hear; light waves, that make everything visible, we do not see; odours that we do not smell; there are animals that do not see as many colours as we do; some things we can neither see nor deny, such as emotions, the bond between mother and child, force of gravity, etc. So, if there are things we do not see, or hear, or smell, it does not imply their absence. Just as an ant cannot apprehend the size and shape of an elephant, life and its processes are beyond human apprehension in the present state of knowledge. Our vast Solar system, which is beyond reach even today, is just a speck in the universe! Even our smallness is beyond our apprehension!

Hair is a gift from God, not a burden. Guru Gobind Singh, in his infinite wisdom, commanded us to respect it and to refrain from tampering with it. This is the visible token of his affection for us, as well as our faith in him. If we have faith in our Guru who was in communion with God, how can we do anything but follow his advice?

As Prof. Puran Singh says: "Let us sing in gratitude 'The Song of the Sikh'":

"Ah! Well, let my hair grow long; ....
I cannot forget the knot He tied on my head;
It is sacred, it is his mark of remembrance.
The Master has bathed me in the light of suns not yet seen;
There is eternity bound in this tender fragile knot.
I touch the sky when I touch my hair, and a thousand stars
twinkle through the night."

Here is the link

I hope it will impress u, too. :) :) :)

khandaaWaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa
Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh khandaa
 

Bmandur

SPNer
May 15, 2008
198
235
Canada
I also have a similar questions.
Why do we eat the flesh and not the bone?
Why do we peel the bananas - since both are provided by nature.
Why does one thing have more value than the other, since both are created by God.

I want to add some more:
Why we take bath every day
Why we eat three or four times a day than we expose the extra food in the morning
why we use the water to wash our hands after we to go the washroom
when we eat food than why can not eat the morning waste food from your body

That is why it's is very important to cut your nails and keep your Hair nice & comb not like Jtta Sadh's we have in Indiamotherlylove
 
Sep 10, 2010
7
4
@Namjap

Oh so since the guy who started the thread is traveling and isn't here to put you back in your place as he was doing , when he was around, you think it's perfectly fine to have a picnic now with these not so cerebral questions!!

Doesn't matter, let's analyze your question.

I also have a similar questions.
Why do we eat the flesh and not the bone?
Why do we peel the bananas - since both are provided by nature.

Logic and reasoning isn't your forte, is it?

Anyways, first of all let me congratulate you on at least initiating some rational thoughts in your mind. There are not many people around here who would try to answer your questions and not sure when skeptic dude would be back so let me take a strike at these:-

Why do we eat the flesh and not the bone? Because it's not logical. Hard bone segments are hard to swallow, can cause choking and if swallowed, can damage our elementary canal. Logical and Practical

Why do we peel the bananas - since both are provided by nature. - Well, first of all, in many parts of he word, the banana peel is indeed eaten and if you really want to, you can very well eat the banana skin. So the question is non sensical. But lets suppose you meant to ask " Why the most popular way to eat banana is to eat it without the peel?" Well, the answer is that the outer portion isn't as sweet and a bit harder to chew. So normal rational, logical people 'prefer' to eat it without the peel. Logical and Practical

Now let's go back to what you were trying to negate.

Why do majority of the world population cut their nails? - Because shorter nails are easier to work with and easy to keep clean. Logical and Practical

Why do majority of the world population cut their hairs? - Easier to maintain, easy to keep clean. Dust and food particles get stuck in them if you have a long free flowing beard or long hair. But the people in colder climates tend to keep beards as it helps them trap body heat and the people in warmer climates tend to keep shorter hair and no beards for the exact inverse reason. See.... Logical and Practical


Now lets go to the other question -- "Why are we sikhs supposed to keep long hair without any logic and reason when we are pretty rational about cutting our nails?" In other words, why do we do something so illogical?, when we are perfectly logical about so many other things like not eating bones!!

And in last 5-6 pages of this thread, skeptic showed that there isn't any logical reason behind keeping long hair and beard and it's just a matter of faith. Not sure if he himself realized this yet, but I did.

And so I have already emailed the link to this thread to all my cousins including the ones in India. I'm sure they will also like to join the discussion



Why does one thing have more value than the other, since both are created by God.

Yes, that's exactly what the skeptic guy asked. This was the very basis of his question. Since you don't have any answer, you tried to get back with above questions, since you know he is not responding now days. Good try!
 
Last edited:

Seeker9

Cleverness is not wisdom
SPNer
May 2, 2010
652
980
UK
@Namjap

Oh so since the guy who started the thread is traveling and isn't here to put you back in your place as he was doing , when he was around, you think it's perfectly fine to have a picnic now with these not so cerebral questions!!

Doesn't matter, let's analyze your question.



Logic and reasoning isn't your forte, is it?

Anyways, first of all let me congratulate you on at least initiating some rational thoughts in your mind. There are not many people around here who would try to answer your questions and not sure when skeptic dude would be back so let me take a strike at these:-

Why do we eat the flesh and not the bone? Because it's not logical. Hard bone segments are hard to swallow, can cause choking and if swallowed, can damage our elementary canal. Logical and Practical

Why do we peel the bananas - since both are provided by nature. - Well, first of all, in many parts of he word, the banana peel is indeed eaten and if you really want to, you can very well eat the banana skin. So the question is non sensical. But lets suppose you meant to ask " Why the most popular way to eat banana is to eat it without the peel?" Well, the answer is that the outer portion isn't as sweet and a bit harder to chew. So normal rational, logical people 'prefer' to eat it without the peel. Logical and Practical

Now let's go back to what you were trying to negate.

Why do majority of the world population cut their nails? - Because shorter nails are easier to work with and easy to keep clean. Logical and Practical

Why do majority of the world population cut their hairs? - Easier to maintain, easy to keep clean. Dust and food particles get stuck in them if you have a long free flowing beard or long hair. But the people in colder climates tend to keep beards as it helps them trap body heat and the people in warmer climates tend to keep shorter hair and no beards for the exact inverse reason. See.... Logical and Practical


Now lets go to the other question -- "Why are we sikhs supposed to keep long hair without any logic and reason when we are pretty rational about cutting our nails?" In other words, why do we do something so illogical?, when we are perfectly logical about so many other things like not eating bones!!

And in last 5-6 pages of this thread, skeptic showed that there isn't any logical reason behind keeping long hair and beard and it's just a matter of faith. Not sure if he himself realized this yet, but I did.

And so I have already emailed the link to this thread to all my cousins including the ones in India. I'm sure they will also like to join the discussion





Yes, that's exactly what the skeptic guy asked. This was the very basis of his question. Since you don't have any answer, you tried to get back with above questions, since you know he is not responding now days. Good try!

Well well..it does appear that in Skeptic.Freethinker Ji's absence
you have appointed yourself guardian of the quest to answer the great question posed in the title of this thread.

It has been an interesting thread in that the debate has been about a particular article of faith when the overall
spiritual path itself has so much to offer

Different strokes for different folks

Some will be content to follow all aspects of discipline their religion requires, whereas others will be happier to evade the bits they
don't like

Big deal

I would suggest there is more to being a good person, a spiritual person, a moral person or any other positive aspect you can think of
than strict adherence to an article of faith. At the end of the day, a mad axe murderer with kesh is still a mad axe murderer...

So adherence to articles of faith should not be blind or forced but should be because you want to

And instead of focussing in on just one aspect, consider everything else this path has to offer. Have you done that? Is it a path you value?
Are there other aspects that you are not entirely comfortable with?

Re your references to logic and reasoning, perhaps you could find a path that requires no faith and requires no commitment
from its followers to demonstrate they are adherents of the faith but is built solely on logic and reasoning?

In that regard, you may consider becoming a Vulcan (Star Trek). I daresay there are some small internet communities out there that can facillitate
this and make it happen for you

Good luck!
 

Mai Harinder Kaur

Mentor
Writer
SPNer
Oct 5, 2006
1,755
2,735
72
British Columbia, Canada
OK, I bowed out and now I'm back. I think somewhere in here we need to ask, what is/are the purpose/s of kakkars? And what is the purpose of Sikhi? Not just what are these things to me as an individual, but what were our Gurus trying to accomplish? Why bother being a Sikh?

Since my ego is intact, I will give my opinion. I think the fingernail thing is a red herring thrown into the soup to distract us from these real questions. I believe we are not only called on to become different people from non-Sikhs, we are called to become a different kind of person. I believe that all Sikhs are called to be Khalsa. Some will answer that call with Yes and some with No. It is an individual choice; one that no one can make for you. I firmly believe that if one is not yet prepared to follow the Khalsa Panth, the answer should be No. For those, perhaps arguments and discussions of kakkars are useless. For those who say Yes, arguments are unnecessary.

However, there are some other possible answers, as life really isn't black and white. There is Maybe. There is I Don't Know. There is Not Yet. The answers to the meaning and purpose of kakkars might be different for people with these differing answers. I sense from this thread that the asker of this question has one or more of these three answers. I am not sure how to answer. I am one who said Yes, stumbled and fell, was picked up by Guru ji, and then again said Yes. I can answer for my position only, not for the others. And I have already done that.

As for keeping kesh, I can make one statement: If you cannot do this one simple thing, how can you expect to do the much more difficult things asked/expected/demanded of a Khalsa?

I might well be wrong; I often am. That's OK. Being neither Guru nor Pope, I claim neither omniscience nor infallibility.

Oh, yes, there is at least one other answer. There is I Don't Care.
 

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