The Conceptualization Of Hope In The Guru Granth Sahib | Sikh Philosophy Network
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The Conceptualization Of Hope In The Guru Granth Sahib

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The Conceptualization Of Hope In The Guru Granth Sahib

Ekjot

SPNer
Jan 7, 2007
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In Christianity, the Book of Job involves a character without sin to the point of an almost inhuman status. When God places the blameless Job into a position of complete suffering, Job hoped that the answer to his question of "Why am I suffering?" would be answered by God. The point of the theme of hope in reference to the book of Job was to show how hope can bring a pitiful man strength even when he knows he hopes for something impossible to happen. Though it did eventually occur in the end, the idea that God would come to speak to Job was an impossible idea to Job at the point where he hopes.
I would like to draw a parallel to Sikhism regarding hope. I have seen many points where hope in salvation from maya would help bring one closer to God, yet I have not been able to find a certain point in the Guru Granth Sahib that deals with the theme of hope in a clear manner. I would really appreciate an explanation regarding the Sikh view of hope and what it brings to a man, along with a location in the Guru Granth Sahib where I can explicitly find this.
Also, the Key in the book of Job was that Job hoped for an answer to his question of why instead of hoping for his suffering to end. Thanks in advance for some insight.



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