Charitropakhyan - [Part Ii] Charitropakhyan: Analysis And Clarification (Bhai Prabjot Singh) | Sikh Philosophy Network
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Charitropakhyan [Part Ii] Charitropakhyan: Analysis And Clarification (Bhai Prabjot Singh)

sunsingh

SPNer
Jun 4, 2008
52
3
Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa
Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh Guru Roop Sangat Jeo,

With Waheguru Ji's blessings, here is part 2 of the ongoing series of articles on Charitropakhyan. This article provides plot descriptions of the Charitars 2 - 16, their importance, lessons to be learned, and clarifications of the misconceptions being spread by anti-panthic forces by twisting some of the meanings of these Charitars. It also contains analysis of Charitar 16, which the haters make the blasphemous mistake of associating it with Sri Guru Gobind Singh Sahib Ji Maharaj. As in previous article, I have extensively used Dr. Harbhajan Singh Ji's book as reference and Gyani Narain Singh Ji's steek for some of the gurmukhi meanings. Ok, here's the article:

[Part II] Charitropakhyan - Analysis of Charitars 2

Although even the first part of Charitropakhyan (Chandi Charitar) is not acceptable to Sri Dasam Granth's adversaries, however it is mainly the second part that is the subject of intense hatred as most of the stories deal with amorous events, and it is their belief that they are of lewd, sexual nature. The plot of the second part is something like this: A fairy from the heavens gets enchanted upon seeing the king Chitr Singh of 'Chitravarti' state and eventually marries him. This queen fairy gave birth to a beautiful son but went back to heavens after a few years (or we can infer that she passed away). King Chitr Singh became very sad. He ordered his ministers to find him a girl with similar beautiful looks and qualities. The daughter of King of Orissa was almost similar in looks and personality as that of fairy Queen. In order to obtain this girl, king Chitr Singh attacked the king of Orissa. Chitr Singh's son, Hanwant Singh, supervised and led his father's army in the battlefield. The king of Orissa was defeated and killed in the war. And so, Chitr Singh won the princess and married her. In reality, however, the new Queen was attracted to king's son – the handsome, youthful Hanwant Singh.​

The king sent Hanwant Singh off to a learned Brahmin for higher education but he always remained quiet and aloof. The king tried talking sense to him, but all his efforts went wasted. When the helpless king presented this issue in front of everyone in his courtroom, Queen Chitramati secretly took Hanwant Singh to her room. She said to him, "You are so charming and indescribably handsome, like the God of love Kama-Dev. O my friend! Your eyes mesmerise me and bewitch my mind... I am not satisfied with the king. Drop your fears of him and copulate with me." The prince, however, flatly refused her offer. The Queen, embarrassed by his refusal, retaliated by instigating the king, "O King! Your son is most evil! He tore my clothes off and scratched and scarred my whole body!" The king, totally blinded in her lust, ordered the execution of the prince without any investigation. This is when his wise ministers tell him tales that describe the carnal desires of females, although there are a few stories that deal with equivalent male characteristics too. Majority of these stories are based on crimes originating from amorous sentiments. Following are the facts that emerge from the above plot:

1. After attaining power of the State, the ruling faction forgets its primary responsibilities and engages itself in carnal pleasures and other similar immoral acts.

2. The rules shove innocent people into battlefield for their own corporal wants. As a result, the humanity has to suffer in the aftermath.

3. According to the story, king's son had reached that state of youth where he was able to lead an army by himself i.e. the king was far older than him. Despite his old age, he married a girl much younger than him, while ideally she should have been married to his son instead. Whenever a man uses his wealth and power as influence to establish illicit relations, the results will always be devastating.

4. The mention of aloofness of Hanwant Singh is a portrayal of a child whose parents, like Chitr Singh, make immoral decisions blinded by the influence of amorous desires. The indication of full mental and physical growth of Hanwant Singh is given when he provides leadership services during the war. But the king is ignorant of his son's mental and physical development. It was natural that all this would have adverse affect on Hanwant Singh. The moral learnt from this incident is that decisions made by people like sexually engrossed Chitr Singh effect their own family first.

5. The moral character of princess was not bad. It is the excesses of man that drives her towards wrong-doings. As a result of these excesses, inappropriate conduct of females projects an illusion of inherent impurity within the society. It is this illusion – the result of male excesses and oppression - that glitters as obscene in the eyes of adversaries of this Granth.

6.In the story, the model, responsible ministers of State have been portrayed. Thus, if a ruler goes astray from the righteous path, it becomes the duty of the ministers to use diplomatic means to persuade him back on the right path – to bring him out of darkness and into the light.

7.It is important to note that the composer of this Bani has deployed intricate, abstract reasoning while creating the plot; he has narrated the ethical content not in first person, rather used ministers for the narrative, which indicates that it is not compulsory for Beebis to read the Charitars. These tales can however be used for the emancipation of people that are trapped in blind faith. Charitropakhyan is a treatise on ethics; it is meant to be quoted wherever need is felt. The first, third and fourth parts of it, however, are highly inspiration for both men and women.

The 401 Charitars that appear in the second part of Charitropakhyan have not been narrated by the ministers for king's amusement; rather, there aim is to put the king back on the path of righteousness and virtue. The opposing faction of Sri Dasam Granth has serious objections against some of the language used in these stories. A brief critical evaluation of this issue is important. In the first story i.e. third Charitar, the protagonist is a woman whose husband is quite aged, because of which she forms illicit relations with a younger person. Minister says:
ਹੋਤ ਤਰੁਨ ਕੇ ਤਰੁਨਿ ਬਸਿ ਬਿਰਧ ਤਰੁਨਿ ਬਸਿ ਹੋਇ ॥
ਇਹੈ ਰੀਤਿ ਸਭ ਜਗਤ ਕੀ ਜਾਨਤ ਹੈ ਸਭ ਕੋਇ ॥੬॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਇਸਤ੍ਰੀ ਜੁਆਨ ਆਦਮੀ ਦੇ ਵੱਸ ਵਿਚ ਅਤੇ ਬੁਢਾ ਆਦਮੀ ਇਸਤ੍ਰੀ ਦੇ ਵੱਸ ਵਿਚ ਹੋ ਜਾਂਦਾ ਏ, ਸੰਸਾਰ ਦੀ ਇਸ ਰੀਤ ਨੂੰ ਸਾਰੇ ਜਾਣਦੇ ਹਨ ॥੬॥
Meaning – Women get bewitched by a youthful male, while an aged man gets lured by a woman. This is the custom of this world, (which) everyone knows.

In the second Charitar of this part (ਘੁਰਕੀ - Ghurki), Mahanand is an old man, because of which his wife commits adultery with younger males. The fact that old age is the cause of her wife's meanderings is crucial to note, because these stories commence with aged men marrying younger women. The abuses hurled at the composer of this work without analysing minute, intricate facts like these are most unfortunate. In the third Charitar (ਸਹਿਜ ਕਲਾ- Sehaj Kalaa), the evil, *******ed mentality of people impersonating as saints is delineated.; a character, that pretends to live in cavity of a tree in the woods, while in reality he absconds with a beautiful girl of a nearby city. In the fourth story (ਮਾਲਮਤੀ – Maalmati), a character of a Muslim lady is painted to illustrate the fact that these amorous events are prevalent in every social order. Sixth (ਅਨੁਰਾਗ ਮਤੀ – Anurag Mati) and seventh (ਜਗ ਜੋਤਮਤੀ – Jag Jogmati) Charitars depict the killing of a couple having illicit relations and eight (ਚਿਤਰਕਲਾ – Chitarkala) Charitar tells the story of a characterless woman who commits heinous crimes of killing her son and husband.

The adversaries of Sri Dasam Granth are particularly critical of the sixteenth (ਛਜੀਆ – Chhajia) Charitar because the events in this story create an illusion of it being associated with Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji. The story goes like this: A king lives happily on the banks of river Satluj. A prostitute, in greed of money, comes to the king's house. She gets smitten by king's good looks, but her beauty does not have any effect on the king. She even tries sorcery on him, but all attempts prove unsuccessful. One day, she comes to the king's court disguised as a Yogi. The king decides to establish contact with her so that he can learn some magic Mantra (i.e. verify her true internal qualities). The prostitute, disguised as a yogi, tells the king to come see her at midnight at her place. Upon king's arrival, the yogi orders everyone else to leave and asks for incense, candles, rice, flowers and wine, which the king makes available. The prostitute in yogi's disguise says to the king that she has got magical power of converting her physical form; that she will disclose the Mantra in male form but will copulate with him in her female form. The king refuses and says, the givers of Mantras are like parents, one cannot dream of having ******* relations with them.

The prostitute then says, "That man, who refuses to satisfy the sexual desires of a passion ridden woman, should be thrown in hell. If you do not copulate with me, I will scream that you are a thief and get you arrested... People from all corners come to you for rewards, then why do you disappoint me?" The king argues, "Why should I destroy my virtues by having immoral relations with you?" Upon hearing this, the woman screams and gathers everyone but quickly changes the version of her story and says she was just murmuring in sleep. Everyone leaves, and she starts pressurising the king again to copulate with him. The king devises a plan and gets the woman drugged; after she falls unconscious, he returns back to his home safe and sound. The king says, "The Mantra that I have learned from this yogi is that I will never have any sexual contact with her. This woman does not know the meaning of love and affection; her only aim in life is to obtain more money and physical gratification." –

ਰੀਤਿ ਨ ਜਾਨਤ ਪ੍ਰੀਤ ਕੀ ਪੈਸਨ ਕੀ ਪਰਤੀਤ ॥
ਬਿਛੂ ਬਿਸੀਅਰੁ ਬੇਸਯਾ ਕਹੋ ਕਵਨ ਕੇ ਮੀਤ ॥੪੩॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਇਹਨੂੰ ਪ੍ਰੇਮ ਦੀ ਰੀਤ ਦਾ ਪਤਾ ਨਹੀਂ, ਪੈਸੇ ਵਾਸਤੇ ਹੀ ਇਸਦਾ ਇਹ ਪ੍ਰੇਮ ਹੈ । ਬਿੱਛੂ, ਸੱਪ ਅਤੇ ਵੇਸਵਾ ਦਸੋ, ਇਹ ਭਲਾ ਕਿਸਦੇ ਮਿੱਤਰ ਹੁੰਦੇ ਹਨ ॥੪੩॥

The king had returned home after leaving 60 coins on the bedside of the unconscious woman. Upon coming home, he swore, "With great effort, I have been able to protect my virtues. I will never, ever look at any woman other than my wife. This pledge is now etched deep in my heart."
ਤਬੈ ਰਾਇ ਗ੍ਰਿਹ ਆਇ ਸੁ ਪ੍ਰਣ ਐਸੇ ਕਿਯੋ ॥
ਭਲੇ ਜਤਨ ਸੌ ਰਾਖਿ ਧਰਮ ਅਬ ਮੈ ਲਿਯੋ ॥
ਦੇਸ ਦੇਸ ਨਿਜੁ ਪ੍ਰਭ ਕੀ ਪ੍ਰਭਾ ਬਿਖੇਰਿਹੌ ॥
ਹੋ ਆਨ ਤ੍ਰਿਯਾ ਕਹ ਬਹੁਰਿ ਨ ਕਬਹੂੰ ਹੇਰਿਹੌ ॥੪੯॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਤਾਂ ਰਾਜੇ ਨੇ ਘਰ ਆਕੇ ਪ੍ਰਣ ਕੀਤਾ ਕਿ ਇਸ ਵਾਰ ਤਾਂ ਮੈਂ ਜਤਨ ਕਰਕੇ ਅਪਣੇ ਧਰਮ ਨੂੰ ਬਚਾ ਲਿਆ, ਹੁਣ ਮੈਂ ਦੇਸ ਦੇਸਾਂਤਰਾਂ ਵਿਚ ਉਸ ਪਰਮੇਸ਼ਰ ਦਾ ਜਸ ਫੈਲਾਵਾਂਗਾ ਅਤੇ ਕਦੇ ਵੀ ਕਿਸੇ (ਪਰਾਈ) ਇਸਤਰੀ ਵਲ ਨਹੀਂ ਤੱਕਾਂਗਾ ॥੪੯॥
ਦੋਹਰਾ ॥
ਵਹੈ ਪ੍ਰਤਗ੍ਯਾ ਤਦਿਨ ਤੇ ਬ੍ਯਾਪਤ ਮੋ ਹਿਯ ਮਾਹਿ ॥
ਤਾ ਦਿਨ ਤੇ ਪਰ ਨਾਰਿ ਕੌ ਹੇਰਤ ਕਬਹੂੰ ਨਾਹਿ ॥੫੦॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਉਹੀ ਪ੍ਰਣ ਉਸੇ ਦਿਨ ਤੋਂ ਮੇਰੇ ਮਨ ਵਸਿਆ ਹੋਇਆ ਹੈ ਅਤੇ ਹੁਣ ਕਦੇ ਭੀ ਪਰਾਈ ਇਸਤ੍ਰੀ ਨੂੰ ਨਹੀਂ ਵੇਖਾਂਗਾ ॥੫੦॥
Skeptics associate this story with Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji. There is one more story before this one, that story is associated with Amritsar and Kiratpur Sahib. The opposition has several arguments – They say that how could it be possible that characterless people lived in cities of Guruji. But even to this day, do only religious people live at holy places? Pilgrims at major holy places get their personal belongings stolen. Therefore, Guruji is giving this caution that immoral people not only enter religious places, they can also try to deceive innocent pilgrims. The protagonist of Guruji does not go to Chajjia to learn any Mantra, because there is nothing but "sex Mantra" in her possession. In the story, a great attempt has been made to expose the real facet of a sexually obsessed woman impersonating as a holy person. The real Mantra (lesson) to be learnt was to reach deep down and expose the intrinsic character of such *******ed individuals disguised as yogis. That is why Guruji says that only Mantra that's learnt from this episode is that no immoral relations should be established with such a woman.
ਰਾਇ ਤਬੈ ਚਿਤ ਭੀਤਰ ਕਿਯਾ ਬਿਚਾਰ ਹੈ ॥
ਯਾਹਿ ਨ ਭਜਿਹੌ ਆਜੁ ਮੰਤ੍ਰ ਕਾ ਸਾਰ ਹੈ ॥
There is a specific meaning and purpose behind giving 60 coins to Chajjia. It has been told in the early parts of this Charitar that this woman became immoral because of her greed for money. The primary reason for entering prostitution has always been money. The act of giving 60 coins symbolises that help should be provided to these daughters of humanity who have fallen into immoral trades because of their poor economic situations; that they can become women for high moral character. The next message the rational composer wants to give through the Charitar is that whenever there is a situation where prestige and faith are at stake, a man should always defend his faith and religious duties. Whenever such tricky situations surface in other Charitars, *******ed people do not hesitate from killing even their own loved ones; in contrast, the protagonist of this Charitar shows immense sympathy for the sorry state of that woman. At the same time, he reiterates his unshakable pledge:
ਰੀਤਿ ਨ ਜਾਨਤ ਪ੍ਰੀਤ ਕੀ ਪੈਸਨ ਕੀ ਪਰਤੀਤ ॥
ਬਿਛੂ ਬਿਸੀਅਰੁ ਬੇਸਯਾ ਕਹੋ ਕਵਨ ਕੇ ਮੀਤ ॥੪੩॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਇਹਨੂੰ ਪ੍ਰੇਮ ਦੀ ਰੀਤ ਦਾ ਪਤਾ ਨਹੀਂ, ਪੈਸੇ ਵਾਸਤੇ ਹੀ ਇਸਦਾ ਇਹ ਪ੍ਰੇਮ ਹੈ । ਬਿੱਛੂ, ਸੱਪ ਅਤੇ ਵੇਸਵਾ ਦਸੋ, ਇਹ ਭਲਾ ਕਿਸਦੇ ਮਿੱਤਰ ਹੁੰਦੇ ਹਨ ॥੪੩॥

The king had returned home after leaving 60 coins on the bedside of the unconscious woman. Upon coming home, he swore, "With great effort, I have been able to protect my virtues. I will never, ever look at any woman other than my wife. This pledge is now etched deep in my heart."
ਤਬੈ ਰਾਇ ਗ੍ਰਿਹ ਆਇ ਸੁ ਪ੍ਰਣ ਐਸੇ ਕਿਯੋ ॥
ਭਲੇ ਜਤਨ ਸੌ ਰਾਖਿ ਧਰਮ ਅਬ ਮੈ ਲਿਯੋ ॥
ਦੇਸ ਦੇਸ ਨਿਜੁ ਪ੍ਰਭ ਕੀ ਪ੍ਰਭਾ ਬਿਖੇਰਿਹੌ ॥
ਹੋ ਆਨ ਤ੍ਰਿਯਾ ਕਹ ਬਹੁਰਿ ਨ ਕਬਹੂੰ ਹੇਰਿਹੌ ॥੪੯॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਤਾਂ ਰਾਜੇ ਨੇ ਘਰ ਆਕੇ ਪ੍ਰਣ ਕੀਤਾ ਕਿ ਇਸ ਵਾਰ ਤਾਂ ਮੈਂ ਜਤਨ ਕਰਕੇ ਅਪਣੇ ਧਰਮ ਨੂੰ ਬਚਾ ਲਿਆ, ਹੁਣ ਮੈਂ ਦੇਸ ਦੇਸਾਂਤਰਾਂ ਵਿਚ ਉਸ ਪਰਮੇਸ਼ਰ ਦਾ ਜਸ ਫੈਲਾਵਾਂਗਾ ਅਤੇ ਕਦੇ ਵੀ ਕਿਸੇ (ਪਰਾਈ) ਇਸਤਰੀ ਵਲ ਨਹੀਂ ਤੱਕਾਂਗਾ ॥੪੯॥
ਦੋਹਰਾ ॥
ਵਹੈ ਪ੍ਰਤਗ੍ਯਾ ਤਦਿਨ ਤੇ ਬ੍ਯਾਪਤ ਮੋ ਹਿਯ ਮਾਹਿ ॥
ਤਾ ਦਿਨ ਤੇ ਪਰ ਨਾਰਿ ਕੌ ਹੇਰਤ ਕਬਹੂੰ ਨਾਹਿ ॥੫੦॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਉਹੀ ਪ੍ਰਣ ਉਸੇ ਦਿਨ ਤੋਂ ਮੇਰੇ ਮਨ ਵਸਿਆ ਹੋਇਆ ਹੈ ਅਤੇ ਹੁਣ ਕਦੇ ਭੀ ਪਰਾਈ ਇਸਤ੍ਰੀ ਨੂੰ ਨਹੀਂ ਵੇਖਾਂਗਾ ॥੫੦॥
Skeptics associate this story with Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji. There is one more story before this one, that story is associated with Amritsar and Kiratpur Sahib. The opposition has several arguments – They say that how could it be possible that characterless people lived in cities of Guruji. But even to this day, do only religious people live at holy places? Pilgrims at major holy places get their personal belongings stolen. Therefore, Guruji is giving this caution that immoral people not only enter religious places, they can also try to deceive innocent pilgrims. The protagonist of Guruji does not go to Chajjia to learn any Mantra, because there is nothing but "sex Mantra" in her possession. In the story, a great attempt has been made to expose the real facet of a sexually obsessed woman impersonating as a holy person. The real Mantra (lesson) to be learnt was to reach deep down and expose the intrinsic character of such *******ed individuals disguised as yogis. That is why Guruji says that only Mantra that's learnt from this episode is that no immoral relations should be established with such a woman.
ਰਾਇ ਤਬੈ ਚਿਤ ਭੀਤਰ ਕਿਯਾ ਬਿਚਾਰ ਹੈ ॥
ਯਾਹਿ ਨ ਭਜਿਹੌ ਆਜੁ ਮੰਤ੍ਰ ਕਾ ਸਾਰ ਹੈ ॥
There is a specific meaning and purpose behind giving 60 coins to Chajjia. It has been told in the early parts of this Charitar that this woman became immoral because of her greed for money. The primary reason for entering prostitution has always been money. The act of giving 60 coins symbolises that help should be provided to these daughters of humanity who have fallen into immoral trades because of their poor economic situations; that they can become women for high moral character. The next message the rational composer wants to give through the Charitar is that whenever there is a situation where prestige and faith are at stake, a man should always defend his faith and religious duties. Whenever such tricky situations surface in other Charitars, *******ed people do not hesitate from killing even their own loved ones; in contrast, the protagonist of this Charitar shows immense sympathy for the sorry state of that woman. At the same time, he reiterates his unshakable pledge:
ਤਬੈ ਰਾਇ ਗ੍ਰਿਹ ਆਇ ਸੁ ਪ੍ਰਣ ਐਸੇ ਕਿਯੋ ॥
ਭਲੇ ਜਤਨ ਸੌ ਰਾਖਿ ਧਰਮ ਅਬ ਮੈ ਲਿਯੋ ॥
ਦੇਸ ਦੇਸ ਨਿਜੁ ਪ੍ਰਭ ਕੀ ਪ੍ਰਭਾ ਬਿਖੇਰਿਹੌ ॥
ਹੋ ਆਨ ਤ੍ਰਿਯਾ ਕਹ ਬਹੁਰਿ ਨ ਕਬਹੂੰ ਹੇਰਿਹੌ ॥੪੯॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਤਾਂ ਰਾਜੇ ਨੇ ਘਰ ਆਕੇ ਪ੍ਰਣ ਕੀਤਾ ਕਿ ਇਸ ਵਾਰ ਤਾਂ ਮੈਂ ਜਤਨ ਕਰਕੇ ਅਪਣੇ ਧਰਮ ਨੂੰ ਬਚਾ ਲਿਆ, ਹੁਣ ਮੈਂ ਦੇਸ ਦੇਸਾਂਤਰਾਂ ਵਿਚ ਉਸ ਪਰਮੇਸ਼ਰ ਦਾ ਜਸ ਫੈਲਾਵਾਂਗਾ ਅਤੇ ਕਦੇ ਵੀ ਕਿਸੇ (ਪਰਾਈ) ਇਸਤਰੀ ਵਲ ਨਹੀਂ ਤੱਕਾਂਗਾ ॥੪੯॥
And finally the following verse, which the adversaries of Sri Dasam Granth Ji are calling the ideas of the writer, and use it to launch attacks against the Granth are in fact uttered by Chajjia and not by Sri Guruji:
ਕਾਮਾਤੁਰ ਹ੍ਵੈ ਜੋ ਤਰੁਨਿ ਆਵਤ ਪਿਯ ਕੇ ਪਾਸ ॥
ਮਹਾ ਨਰਕ ਸੋ ਡਾਰਿਯਤ ਦੈ ਜੋ ਜਾਨ ਨਿਰਾਸ ॥੨੩॥
ਤਨ ਅਨੰਗ ਜਾ ਕੇ ਜਗੈ ਤਾਹਿ ਨ ਦੈ ਰਤਿ ਦਾਨ ॥
ਤਵਨ ਪੁਰਖ ਕੋ ਡਾਰਿਯਤ ਜਹਾ ਨਰਕ ਕੀ ਖਾਨਿ ॥੨੪॥
ਅਰਥ (ਗਿਆਨੀ ਨਰੈਣ ਸਿੰਘ) – ਕਾਮ ਦੀ ਦੁਖੀ ਕੀਤੀ ਹੋਈ ਜਿਹੜੀ ਇਸਤ੍ਰੀ ਪਿਆਰੇ ਪਾਸ ਆਉਂਦੀ ਏ, ਜੋ ਪਿਆਰਾ ਉਹਨੂੰ ਨਿਰਾਸ਼ ਕਰਦਾ ਹੈ ਤਾ ਐਸਾ ਮਿੱਤਰ ਘੋਰ ਨਰਕ ਵਿਚ ਡਿਗਦਾ ਹੈ ॥੨੩॥
ਜੋ ਆਦਮੀ ਕਾਮ-ਰਤੀ ਇਸਤ੍ਰੀ ਨੂੰ ਭੋਗ ਦਾਨ ਨਹੀਂ ਦੇਂਦਾ, ਉਸ ਆਦਮੀ ਨੂੰ ਨਰਕ ਦੀ ਖਾਨ ਵਿਚ ਸੁੱਟ ਦੇਣਾ ਚਾਹੀਦਾ ਹੈ ॥੨੪॥
[hr]
If Guruji Maharaj wishes, the next article will attempt to present analysis of the (in)famous (A)noop Kaur Charitar and more..

Gurfateh!

my apologies, the translations are by Bhai Prabhjot Singh, originally posted on The Voice of Sikh Youth.
 

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According to an SPN forum rule Gurmukhi verses should be accompanied by English translations. This can be difficult in the case of "Dasam Granth" as many sections have not been translated, included the charitthars.

Therefore I have provided the translation by Pritpal Singh to accompany the analysis of Bhai Prabjot Singh.



Chritro Pakhyaan translated by Pritpal Singh Bindra
(2 through 16)

Chritar
Two

Dohira
There lived in the city of Chitervati, a Raja called Chitar Singh.
He enjoyed abundance of wealth, and possessed numerous material goods, chariots,elephants and horses.(1)
He had been bestowed with beautiful physical features;

The consorts of the gods and demons, the female Sphinxes and the town fairies, were allenchanted.(2)
A fairy, bedecking herself, was ready to go to Indra, the Celestial Raja of the Rajas,
But she stymied on the vision of that Raja, like a butterfly on the sight of a flower.(3)
Arril
Seeing the Raja the Fairy was captivated.
Planning to meet him, she called in her messenger.
`Without meeting my beloved I would poison myself,' she told her messenger,
`Or I would push a dagger through me.'(4)
Dohira
The messenger made the Raja to empathize with her (the fairy).
And, rejoicing with the beats of the drums, the Raja took her as his bride.(5)
The Fairy gave birth to a beautiful son,
Who was as powerful as Shiva and passionate like Kamdev, the Cupid.(6)
The Raja had the pleasure of making love to the Fairy for many years,
But one day the Fairy flew away to the Domain of Indra.(7)
Without her company the Raja was extremely afflicted, and he called in his ministers.
He got her paintings prepared and, to trace her at home and abroad, displayed them
everywhere.(8)
By searching and searching all over, a maiden, a true likeness of the Fairy, both in
features and nature, was found in the household of the Ruler of Orrisa.(9)
Chaupeyi
The exhilarated Raja immediately called his courtiers and handed out lot of wealth in bounty.
All of them, dressed in iron-coats, armed themselves and went to raid the city of Orrisa.(10)
The other Raja understood the situation and observed the various (enemy) armies.
He ordered for the war and girded himself for the fight.(11)
Bugles of death were sounded and the heroes came laced with the fighting attires and holding spears and bows and arrows.
They all assembled in the fighting fields.(12)
The curved swords and other arms decapitated even brave enemies,
But, they (the enemies), full of arrogance, did not move back and fought valiantly.(13)
Then Chitar Singh, holding a spear in his hand, stayed behind, and sent (his son) Hanwant Singh forward.(14)
Savaiya
Thousands of the brave men, who could challenge even the Himalayan Mountains, cameforward.
Seeing the devil like heroes, the Earth and sturdy Sumer Hills started to shake.
The brave enemies began to crumble like the mountain facing the courageous like Hanuman.(15)
Wherever the fully armed brave enemies assembled, the heroes pounced upon them.
They fought till they became the victims of the sharp swords.
The columns of the enemy were like the flowing rivulets in which the Kashtriya progeny swam in elation.(16)


Dohira
The Ruler of Orrisa was assassinated and his daughter was won over.
And the Raja married her according to the customs of the Shastras.(17)
The daughter of the Ruler of Orrisa was known as Chitramatti.
She always had sensual looks for Hanwant Singh.(18)
He was sent by the Raja to the household of a Brahmin to seek education.
But (as instructed by the Rani), (the Brahmin) did not speak to him for one month.(19)
Chaupeyi
The Raja sent for his son, and the Brahmin brought (the son) with him.
The Raja asked him (the son) to read and write,
But Hanwant Singh remained mute.(20)
The Raja brought him in his inner chamber, where thousands of fairy-like beauties were awaiting.(21)
When Raja announced that the boy did not speak,
Chandramati took him to her own palace.(22)
Arril
The Rani asked (the boy), `If a sagacious thief steals away some ones heart then what should be done?
`Shouldn't she take out her heart and present it to her lover?
`And the day she had satisfied her lover through incantations, she should release her temporal being.(23)
`You are ecstatic and, like Cupid, you are endowed with beauty, and are above any praise.
`O, my friend your enticing eyes are heart throbbing.(24)
Savaiya
`I adore your comeliness and I am pierced by the arrows of separation from you,
`Renounce the Raja's fright and make love to me.
`I am never satiated by Raja and, therefore, he cannot harm you in any way.
`I have tried hard but my craving desire is never fulfilled.'(25)
Dohira
The Rani was roused, became extremely passionate and her whole body coveted for love,
Because her heart was lost in the sensual looks of the Prince.(27)
`I am over powered with your countenance and there is none else from whom I can seek protection.
`Without the touch of your beautiful eyes I am writhing like a fish (out of water).'(27)
Chaupeyi
The Prince consented not, and she was ashamed of her act.
She went to Chitar Singh and told, `Your son is great betrayer.'(28)
She had torn her clothes and scratched her face with her finger-nails to infuriate the Raja.(29)
Chaupeyi
Hearing this the Raja flew into rage and took his son to kill him.
But his ministers made him to perceive that the Chritars were not easily
discernable.(30)(1)
In this Second Parable of Auspicious Chritars

Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(2)(78)

Chritar
Three
Dohira


The Raja then put the son in the prison.
And early next morning he called him over.(1)
(Then his Minister commenced narrating thus:)
There lived a girl in a village.
She had two lovers; one was thin and lean, and the other a fat one.(2)
She was very pretty and possessed the eyes like of an antelope.
She had full consciousness of understanding the highs and lows of the life.(3)
Chaupeyi
She used to live in the city of Kalpi and indulged in all sorts of lovemakings.
That, with the eyes of a deer, and with her exquisiteness, she made the moon to feel shy.(4)
Dohira
Her fat lover was old but the other, the young one, was slender.
Day in and day out she kept on making love with them.(5)
A young female is captivated by a young man and the old man is enchanted by an old woman;
And the whole world knows this habitude.(6)
The lady always enjoyed making love with the slender person but hesitated to go near the fat one.
She always repented after making love with the old one.(7)
Once when she was passionately involved with the young man, the fat lover came back
and knocked at the door of the lady.(8)
She suggested to the young lover to break the door and run as some sinner had come and
would tie them both.(9)
She had made the thin friend to acquiesce to her request.
And she hastily got up and stood before the old man.(10)
While getting up in haste the drops of semen fell on the floor, which were noticed by the fat-lover,
And he asked women to disclose the mystery.(11)
She informed, `On the sight of your handsome face, I could not control myself.
`As a result of this, semen (from my body) dripped down.'(12)
That fool, with animal instinct, was over exhilarated thinking, `Seeing me, the lassie
became so excited that her semen dripped down on the earth.'(13)(1)
In this Second Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(3)(91)




Chritar
Four


Chaupeyi
The King had put his son in the prison and in the morning he called him back.
The Minister conversed again and the Raja paid attention.(1)
Dohira
A poor man called Mahan Nand had a wife,
With whom numerous Hindus and Muslims used to indulge in making love.(2)
Mahan Nand's wife was known as Ghurki (literally scolding),
She always scolded her husband.(3)
He was blind of one eye and much older in age than his wife.
The wife despised him but he felt as if she was his life and soul.(4)
As soon as he would go out of the house to work, his wife would get entangled with a young man to make love.(5)
When she would notice Mahan Nand coming back, she would ascertain to embrace him and felicitate him with pleasant talks and ravishing action.(6)
She would kiss his both the ears and eyes, and, finding a right moment with trickery,
would bid goodbye to her (hidden) lover.(7)
Mahan Nand's ears would be alerted with some noise (of the lover leaving) but, being
blind of one eye, he would not fathom the mystery.(8)
The wife would express to him, `I was overwhelmed with your sensuality,
`And for that I kissed your ears and eyes in passion.'(9)
Hearing this Mahan Nand would get exhilarated,
And without understanding the enigma, would revel in making love.(10)
In this Fourth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(4)(101)

Chritar
Five

Dohira
The Raja had, then, put the son in the prison.
And early next morning he called him over.(1)
Chaupeyi
The Raja sent his son to the prison and early next morning called him back.
The Minister conversed with the Raja so as to eliminate his afflictions.(2)
A Yogi lived in the woods in a cottage inside a tree trunk.
Through some incantation he abducted the daughter of a Shah.(3)
Chaupeyi
The trader was known as Kasikar and name of his daughter was Sehaj Kala.
The Yogi had taken her away and put her in a tree in the woods.(4)
Dohira
In the tree, he had carved a house with a window in it.
The Yogi made love to her every day and night.(5)
Closing the door he used to go to the town during the day to beg, and come back to the tree in the evening.(6)
On his return he always clapped his hands and the girl, hearing the sound, opened the door with her own hands.(7)
Every day he acted like this and (to pass time) played the sweet music on the flute.
Although he displayed all his Yogic feats, Sehaj Kala never commented.(8)
Dohira
In the city there lived the clever son of the Raja.
He was endowed with virtues and power like Indra, and the passion of Cupid.(9)
Wives of the deities, demons, celestial musicians, Hindus, and Muslims, all those were
entranced with his splendour and charm.(10)
Chaupeyi
Without letting him know, the Raja's son followed the Yogi.
When the Yogi had entered the tree, the Raja's son climbed the tree.(11)
Next morning when the Yogi went to the town, the Raja's son came down and clapped his hands.
And, then, daringly, the prince made love with her.(12)
Dohira
He served her many savoury viands.
He was very much delighted and again made love with her.(13)
The Prince captured her heart immensely.
From then on the lady disregarded the Yogi.(14)
Arril
When something propitious is available, the adverse one is ignored, and is not cared for by the wise-ones.
Why would a woman, getting a wealthy and wise young man, go to a simpleton, poor and unwise old man,(15)
Dohira
The Shah's daughter requested the prince to take her with him,
`I will abandon the Yogi and make passionate love with you.'(16)
(Said the prince,) `Yes, I will take you with me if you call the Yogi for me,
`Who will play love-tunes with his both the eyes shut and resonantly clapping his hands.'(17)
(As planned) The women found an auspicious moment, when the Yogi kept his eyes shut and played the love-tunes while she made love with the son of the Raja.(18)
Dohira
The prince, at the end, closed the door behind in the tree.
Taking the lady with him, he mounted the horse, and left for the city.(19)
In this Fifth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(5)(120)




Chritar
Six

Dohira
The Raja had put the son in the prison.
And early next morning he called him over.(1)
The Minister, then, narrated to him the story of a woman.
Hearing the story, the Raja was enthralled, and requested it to be retold.(2)
A peasant had a (pretty) wife; she was trammelled by that idiotic.
But a Raja on a hunting spree fell in love with her.(3)
Arril
He was the brave ruler of the city of Lang Chalala and was known as Madhukar Shah.
He had fallen in love with the peasant girl called Mal Matti.
In the pursuit of hunting, he came to her house.(4)
Dohira
After hunting he made love to that girl.
In the meantime, there arrived the peasant who was looking like an ugly bear.(5)
The peasant's arrival made the Raja scared, but the woman pacified him,
`Be not afraid. While the peasant is still watching, I will make you to cross over by putting your foot on his head.'(6)
Arril
She hid the Raja in the inner dark room and came out crying and said to that naive, `I had a bad dream last night; you were bitten by a black reptile.(7)
Dohira
`(To seek an antidote) I called a Brahmin to the house,
`And the Brahmin made me to understand this.(8)
`A Raja-like person was manifested when a chaste woman meditated with devotion.(9)
`If that person walked over putting his feet on your head and saying nothing,
`Then you could live long and save my nuptial tie.(10)
`Now with your permission I meditate because with your demise I will immolate myself and along with your life (hereafter) I will enjoy the serenity.'(11)
Then the woman mediated and beseeched, `If I am chaste and virtuous, a personality
should manifest and walk over putting one foot on the head of my husband.'(12)
Hearing this the Raja got up, putting his foot on his head walked over.
And that fool, considering his wife to be beyond reproach, was delighted.(13)(1)
In this Sixth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
In this Sixth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Completed with Benediction.(6)(133)


Chritar
Seven

Chaupeyi
A Muslim woman used to live in the city of Shahjehanbad.
Now, with due modification, I re-narrate the wonder she performed.(1)
Day and night numerous persons came to her and frolicked in making love.
Even the dogs were ashamed of her actions.(2)
She was the daughter of a Mughal and her name was Zain Abadi.
Indulging in lovemaking she had become shameless.((3)
Dohira
A person called Zahid Khan was with her when another person, named Yusaf Khan,
came as well.
She got up abruptly and told Zahid Khan, `I have called in a vaid, the lay-doctor, for you.'(4)
Arril
She came forward and said that she had called in a vaid, just for him (Zaid Khan)..
She stressed him to come forward, get treated immediately,
And briskly leave for his home after becoming disease free.(5)
Dohira
(Yusaf Khan – vaid,) `Running to this house, you become breathless, in sleep you breath
enigmatically and you are always feeling pain in your knees.
`You are suffering from a triple-disease,(6)
Arril
`I will get you treated; there is nothing to laugh at.
`One should not refrain; the treatment must match the disease and one should not desist.
`One should not keep ailment in secret from a vaid, a midwife, a guru and a friend.
`There is no one else to whom we could open our minds.'(7)
Kabit
She made him to eat the offspring of the frogs.
Made him to work in the field to sow radishes.
Got his head beaten with slippers and sent him out to graze his sheep.
His head was strewn with dust and his moustache was shaved off. His condition became indescribable.
He was thrown out of the house to beg wearing a patched coat.
The woman displayed the trick and the lover chucked him out after making him a fool.(8)
Chaupeyi
When he returned after begging, he did not find him (Yusaf Khan) there.
He asked, `The one who had treated me, the one who has curtailed my disease, where has
he gone?'
Pity, the fool could not comprehend the real motive.(9)
Dohira
(She said,) `Only through good luck, the reptile charmer and the medicine men are found
and they run away after suggesting the treatment.
`They are not traced afterwards.’
Chaupeyi
That fool believed her to be trustworthy and did not try to understand the real purpose.
Thinking that she had helped him to eliminate his big infirmity, he started to love her even more.
In this Seventh Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,

Completed with Benediction.(7)(145)

Chritar
Eight


Dohira
In the city of Akbarabad, a woman, devoid of good deeds, used to live.
She was well versed in the magical charms and incantations.(1)
She was known as Kunwar Anurag Matti and even the consorts of the gods and the demons envied her.(2)
Arril
She constantly involved herself in passionate lovemakings without remorse.
The Sayeeds, the Sheikhs, the Pathans, and the Mughals frequently came to her and went to their homes after having sex.(3)
Dohira
Thus they came daily and went to their houses after copulating.(4)
In the first quarter of the day, came the Sayeed, the Sheikh in the second, the Mughal in the third and in the fourth quarter came the Pathan, to enjoy procreation with her.(5)
Chaupeyi
Forgetting the turn, one day the Pathan came in before anybody else.
Following him the Sayeed entered as well.
She made the Pathan to hide under the bed and took Sayeed in an embrace.(6)
Incidentally, immediately after the Sayeed the Sheikh walked in, and she hid the Sayeed
in hey.
The Mughal was not far off and seeing him she entrapped the Sheikh in an hessian bag.(7)
In the mean time the constables from the City Kotwal, the police station officer, walked in.
She made the Mughal to run to the corn room.(8)
The constables surrounded the house from all sides and seeing no escape she put the house to fire,
And came outside the house and stood there.(9)
She started to lament aloud beating her breast, `My house is on fire, my house is burning.'
All the four were burned to death and no one even came across their ashes.(10)(1)
In this Eighth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(8)(155)


Chritar
Nine

Dohira
A trader's wife used to live in the city of Lahore.
Her sparkling eyes made even the flowers to blush.(1)
Chaupeyi
Known as Jag Jot Matti, there was none equal to her in beauty in the world.

On her sight, the lightening, as well, felt humiliated.(2)
Dohira
Impressed by her figurative beauty, a Raja was pervaded with lust.
With determination, he presented his proposal to make love to her.(3)
She fell in love with the Raja too and through her maid, Chitarkala, called the Raja to her
house.(4)
On the sight of the Raja, Chitarkala herself fell flat on the ground;
Cupid, the adversary of Shiva, had pierced her with his arrow of love.(5)
When she was roused, she said, `O my Raja, please make love with me.
`Your sight has put me in the grip of passion and I have lost all my senses.'(6)
Dohira
The Raja refused to make love with her.
Fuming in rage she brought the Raja with her (to Jog Matti’s house) but went to the trader and told him that a man was visiting his house in his absence.(7)
Arril
Hearing this he came home immediately and was very much afflicted seeing deceitful
secret of his wife.
The wife thought, seeing her with the Raja, he (husband) would kill him and, thereafter, would finish her as well.(8)
Dohira
She thought, `I must do something to save the Raja. I must serve dainty food to my husband and send him away.'(9)
She wrapped round the Raja in a hessian sack and made it stand near the wall.
She received her trader husband with great pleasure and cooked lavish food for him.(10)
Arril
She served him dainty viands and asked him to throw a handful of dry-fruit towards the
sack and said,
`You win if it goes straight into the sack, otherwise you lose.(11)
Dohira
Taking the fruit, the trader threw it to the sack and the woman said, `O my Raja eat it to your satisfaction.'(12)
The trader flew into rage and asked the lady, `Why have you called me a Raja?
`Disclose the reason behind this.'(13)
The woman said, `I live in your house. I love you and that is why I called you a Raja.
You are my Raja.'(14)
The fool was satisfied without knowing the reason, became the embodiment of love and left for his business.(15)
Soon after, she facilitated the Raja to come out.
Learning about the full interaction, the Raja beat her up and left the place.(16)(1)
In this Ninth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(9)(171)

Chritar
Ten


Dohira
The Minister narrated to the Raja.
The maid of the trader's wife, who was beaten up in a temper, had displayed a few
wonders as well:(1)
Chaupeyi
She (the maid) was infuriated after getting severe beating.
She got involved herself with a Sayeed.
She invited him to her house every day and started to plunder the wealth of the trader’ wife.(2)
Dohira
Before she put Sayeed in the bed belonging to the trader's wife, the maid had gone to the trader's wife and told, `The Raja, imbued in your love, is waiting. Please go quick to the house where fire is visible.'(3)
Making sure, the maid, then, ran and approached the Raja, led him to the place where the
Sayeed was lying down and said, `Here, your beloved is lying down. Go and hold her by her
feet.'(6)
Previously she (the maid) had already warned the Sayeed and told him to remain alert,
with a sword beside him, in case some one walked in.(7)
On the other side, the place where thieves were sitting with fire on, the trader’s wife came.
They (the thieves) plundered and killed her and buried her body in a ditch.(8)
Arril
Here, the Raja adhered to the truth of the maid's words and leapt forward to touch (Sayeed's) feet.
The Sayeed jumped up and with one stroke decapitated the Raja.(9)
The thieves had been made to kill the trader's wife, and, after killing the Raja, the Sayeed took the maid (Chitarkala) to his abode.(11)
The woman's heart may be captured but never let her steal your heart.
Providing her myriads of victuals, just keep her satisfied.(12)
The gods, such as Gandharabh, Jach, Bhujang, Dev, Devil, none could fathom the attributes of the women,
Then what the poor human creatures could achieve.(13)(1)
In this Tenth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(10)(184)


Chritar
Eleven


Dohira
Then the Minister inculcated and narrated this tenth attribute.(1)
A shopkeeper used to live in the city of Peshawar, whose wife was overrun by bad characters.
She had killed the shopkeeper and immolated herself with his dead body.
Now I am going to recite their tale:(2)
The shopkeeper went away on a business trip.
In his absence she could not control her passion and invited a person to live with her in the house.(3)
Whenever hungry, her baby cried for milk, but, day in or day out, she kept herself busy in
love-making.(4)
Once when the baby cried hard seeking feed, her lover asked her, `Go, silence the child and, then, eliminate my sensual agonies.'(5)
The lady went and tried to breast feed him but child would not get quiet.
(To quieten him), she suffocated the baby with her own hands and, then, took the man out of his erotic miseries.(6)
Noticing the baby's sudden stoppage of weeping, the man asked, `Why your child is not crying now.'
She disclosed, `For the sake of your pleasure I have killed my son.'(7)
Dohira
Learning the fact, he was much scared and rebuked her for doing thus to the baby.(8)
When he reproved her action severely, she took out a sword and immediately cut his head off.(9)
With the help of another person she dug out a hole in the corner and buried them both in it.(10)
(Incidentally,) a mendicant was there at the time, which had watched the entire episode.
He went and narrated the whole story to his friend, the shopkeeper.(11)
Chaupeyi
Learning the fact, the shopkeeper came home and asked his wife thus,
`Dig that corner and show me, otherwise I will not live in this house.'(12)
Arril
When the man said thus to the woman, she flew into a rage, took out the sword and killed
him too.
Decapitating him she started crying aloud, `The thieves raided the house and killed my husband.'(13)
Dohira
`They killed my husband; they killed my son and took all our wealth.
`Now, with the beat of the drum I declare that I will become a Sati by immolating myself with him.'(14)
Next morning she headed towards the funeral pyre and the people followed, too, with firewood in their hands, to observe the spectacle.(15)
Dohira
Listening to the beats of the drums and observing the movement of the people, thatmendicant, who had seen all the happenings, came along too.(16)
Chaupeyi
In eagerness, he thought over, and while walking along, he asked, `Oh, Lady, you listen to me'(17)
Dohira
(The Lady,) `You realise what a bad act I have committed. Had you told me so earlier I would have done the same to you.’
She killed her son, the lover and the husband, and, with the beat of the drums she immolated herself with her husband and became a Sati.(19)
Arril
Never let a woman know what is in your mind. Rather learn what are her internal thoughts.
Once she is in the know of the secret, that must become an open secret otherwise you will have to repent thereafter.(20)(1)
In this Thirteen Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(11)(204)

Chritar
Twelve

Dohira
In the city of Brindaban, what did Radhika, the daughter of Brikh Bhan, do?
Now I am going to narrate the attribute of that lady.(1)
She was obsessed with the love of Krishna and, day and night, searched for him,
The one who could not be acquiesced by Vyas, Prasur, Sur, Asur and other Rishis, (the
Vedic saints).(2)
(She thought,) `For whose sake I have abandoned all my modesty and wealth,
`How can I get my loved-one to satiate my passion?’’(3)
With her heart full of affection, she entrusted a confidant to device some pretext to enable
her to meat Krishna.(4)
Arril
`Make me to meet the one whose enigma Braham, Vyas and Vedas, could not concede,
`Even Shiva, Sanik and Shesh-naag believed him beyond horizons,
`And whose benevolence were chanted world over.'
Thus she pleaded to meet the eminent man.(5)
Kabit
`I have been languishing in his remembrance, my body has turned into ashes (of passion),
`Tell him about my wearing a patched coat and a cap of a renouncer in his memory.
`I have adorned saffron clothes (of an ascetic), my eyes have turned red in pain and I am living on the food of his thought.
`I take my bath in my tears, and, while craving for his vision, my eyes are producing smoky flames.
`O, my friend! Go and do tell the son of Nand the story of the self-mortification of the eyes of the milk-maids.'(6)

She kept waiting in her full adornment when Krishna passed by endowing a glimpse.
`O my mother! Where could I go to poison myself to death?
`I feel like the scorpions have bitten me.
`He has stolen my heart and taken it away wrapped up in his turban (mind).(7)
Dohira
`O my beloved! I am intoxicated in your separation, I cannot bear any more.
`In desperation I have written you this letter.(8)
Kabit
`Your eyes are epitome of beauty and melody and are the treasure of the charm of the she-deer and the fish,
`And thrive the hearts, and are the paragons of benevolence.
`O, my friend! Your vision is as sweet as honey, and sharp, as well, like the arrows of Sri Ram Chander.'(9)
Dohira
Then, Radha called a friend of hers known as Prabha.
She revealed to her all her aspirations, and sent her to Sri Krishna.(10)
Through a letter she conveyed, `Your Radha has been pierced in your separation. Please come and meet her.(11)
`Alienated by you, your maid is dying and you may narrate this during any of your lessons.'(12)
After the maid, Prabha, had discerned the whole situation,
She went to the place where Sri Krishna was sitting majestically.(13)
Chaupeyi
On reading the letter Sri Krishna perceived the true love she was in.
All the letters of epistle, studded with diamonds and pearls, instilled a deep compassion in his heart.(14)
Savaiya
`Full of charm you are an enchanting, and the partridge, stork, lotus-flower, fish remain at your service.
`You are the blessed one, and are conquering our hearts.
`O my passionless Sri Krishna, you are brimming with love.
`Your vision, which is full of (celestial) pride, is the treasure of all the contentment.(16)
Kabit
`I perceive the sandalwood as the affliction, the oil-lamp as the kindling pyre, and the enchanting paintings look like the charisma of the magicians.
`I feel the bed as a funeral pyre, your fascination strikes like the lightening and I cannot adore the pearls around my neck.
`The splendour seems like the gallows, the enchantment is slapping me and the sweet viands seems like stones.
`O my captivating Krishna, without you the moon night is irritating me, the fly-whisk seems like a whip, and the moon presents witchery atmosphere.’(17)
Dohira
Reading her letter, Sri Krishna was appeased and arranged his own maid to accompany Radha's friend.(18)
To see Radha, a meeting at the river Jamuna was planned,
And a maid was at once assigned to go and make the arrangements.(19)
Hearing the order of Sri Krishna, the maid flew like a flying horse to that direction.(20)
The maid, which was thought to be as fast as lightening in the sky, had been assigned by
Sri Krishna to go and see Radha.(21)
Savaiya
Having had her meals, suffusing herself with the perfumes of flowers, she was sitting there casually.
The maid came in and told her, `You the one cherished by (Sri Krishna) with broad vision, come quick he is aspiring for you.
`Go and meet him like the lightening immerses in the clouds.
`The night is passing away and you are not listening to me.(22)
`You had told me that he often passed through the streets in the guise of a cowherd.
`Sometime he visited the houses of the milkmaids, to enjoy the milk, wearing the feathers
of a pea{censored}.
`Now, my friend! He is playing the flute on the banks of Jamuna and has sent me for you.
`Come, listen to me and come, Sri Krishna is calling you.(23)
`He always praises you, and to get your attention he plays the flute, and, for your sake, he
is embellishing himself and blending his body with the sandalwood cream.'
Sri Krishna’s soul was filched by Radha, the daughter of Brikhbhan, but nobody else could experience the perception.(24)
Sri Krishna, the one emanating the sublime rays like the feathers of the pea{censored}, was ensconced at the banks of Jamuna.
Hearing about Sri Krishna the cowherd-boys became impatient and proceeded to the place.
And, learning all about Sri Krishna, Radha primed herself, and, getting rid of all the fears, she, as well, quickly walked along.
Discerning Sri Krishna, she had abandoned her home, and, in the wake of passion, forgotten her pride.(25)
The pearly ornaments and the nose-stud enhanced her bodily grace.
The pearly necklaces and bracelets were adding charm, and, holding the lotus flowers, she waited for Sri Krishna.
She looked like the rice-pudding emanating from the body of the moon which (the moon)
had been churned out of the sea.(26)
Chaupeyi
The bliss was radiating every heart around the place over where Sri Krishna was bathing.
On one side was Gopal, Sri Krishna, and on the other side there were the dames who
were singing, giggling and clapping their hands.(27)
Savaiya
In exhilaration Sri Krishna was bathing in the deep waters.
On one side were the ladies and Sri Krishna was seated on the other.
(Soon) both (Sri Krishna and Radha) were together. They dived and loved each other,
Thinking that all the rest were away and none cared to look at them.(28)
In deep love with Sri Krishna, Radha did not care to realise others reflections.
In the wake of youth, she was brimming with passion, and her lover's image was getting carved in her heart.
Not to feel ashamed, in the presence of her friends, she kept loving Sri Krishna while remaining inside water.
And in the intensity of love she persisted there fully absorbed.(29)
Sorath
The human being who divulges even a bit of his secret to his spouse,
The contriver annihilates him in an iota of the time period.(30)(1)
In this Twelfth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(12)(234)



Chritar
Thirteen


Dohira
Then the Minister narrated another anecdote,
Hearing which the Raja waved his head in unison but kept quiet;(1)
There lived an aide on the hills, and his spouse lived in our village.
Her husband was known as Ramdas.(2)
When Ramdas slept else where, she would sleep with an aide, who used to get up at mid- day to go for his ablution.(3)
Once there appeared a few strangers at the household of that aide but his mistress had no knowledge of them when she had arrived there.(4)
She immediately inquired whether Ramdas had not come there,
`He is my God-like husband. Where has he gone? Please tell me.'
Dohira
Declaring so she went out towards the main street.
All the strangers immediately got up and left the place.
Subsequently she abandoned all her fears and soon came back to induce her lover.(6)
And after making love with that aide, she retreated to her beautiful abode.(7)
How-so-ever one might be wise, one would not be able to fathom the female-attributes.(8)
The one who divulged ones secrets to a female, the old age would overpower his youth,
and the angel of death surround to wrench his soul.
Sorath
The gist of the Simritis, Vedas and Koka Shastras is that the secret might not be imparted to the females.
Rather, instead, one should try to understand her enigmas.(10)(1)
In this Thirteen Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(13)(244)


Chritar
Fourteen

Dohira

Then the Minister narrated such a parable that the mind became serene, and the virtuosity was much enhanced;(1)
A woman went into to a garden and started loving some body else.
Her lover instantly walked in there too.(2)
Chaupeyi
When she observed her second lover intruding in,
She asked the first one, `Disguise yourself as a gardener, keeping a few flowers in front
of you.(3)
Dohira
`When we sit down in the garden in affectionate posture, you immediately put flowers and fruits in front of us.'(4)
The lover acted the way she told him and collected the flowers and fruit and held them in his hand.(5)
As soon as they sat down he straightaway placed the flowers and fruit in front of them.(6)
Then she said, `This gardener has come to you. You must give him lot of money to go away without getting angry.'(7)
Hearing this the man gave him lot of money.
Thus the woman, disguising the other man as gardener, let him escape by deception,(8)
Through the attributive fragrance of the flowers,
O my Raja! she made her lover to go away and escape scot-free.(9)(1)
In this Fourteen Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(14)(253)


Chritar
Fifteen


Dohira
Thus the Minister narrated the fourteenth parable to the Raja.
The Raja was extremely pleased and made the Minister very rich by giving him money.(1)
A widow used to live in the city of Ramdaspur.
She would offer love to various people with no discrimination of caste.(2)
Her spouse had died soon after she became pregnant and, shy of people's abashment, she was worried.(3)
Chaupeyi
Her name was Bhanmati and she was known as a charlatan.
She was very much apprehensive of her pregnancy.(4)
Arril
She conducted a sacrificial feast and called numerous people.
Before their arrival, she had put herself to sleep on a bed.
She stood up abruptly with deceiving intention,
And started to cry aloud repeating the name of her husband.(5)
Dohira
`The day my husband expired he told me, "If you immolate with my (dead) body you will go to hell.(6)
Arril
`"Bhanu (my son) is still a child, you will have to look after him and bring him up.
`"When he starts to earn his livelihood, I will come, then, and meet you in the dream."(7)
Dohira
`Bhanu is now big enough now and my husband has come into my dream.
`Consequently I am going to Kiratpur of (Guru) Har Rai and immolate myself.(8)
Arril
People tried to dissuade her but she did not listen to any one.
Stubbornly she laundered all her wealth and commenced her mission.
Leaving Ramdaspur, she came to Keeratpur and with the beat of the drum, and standing
on one leg she immolated herself.(9)
Dohira
When many people saw her immolating herself.
They were satisfied with her sincerity but they did not realize the truth.(10)
One who trust (such) a woman, within seven days he destroys himself.(11)
One who discloses his secret to (such) a lady, he always degrades himself.(12)
In this Fifteenth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(15)(265)


Chritar
Sixteen

Dohira
There lived a Raja at the banks of river Satluj.
Enticed by the lure of his wealth, a prostitute came over.(1)
Arril
She was called Chhajia and, to her rich patrons, she was known by the name of Ladhia.
Any body who saw her felt a seductive sensation through her beauty.(2)
Dohira
She fell in love with that Raja but the Raja did not get into her trap.
She commenced on her designs how to meet him.(3)
`He is not falling in love with me, what should I do.
`Neither he comes to my house, nor calls me over.(4)
`I must contrive quickly,' thinking thus she indulged in the magical charms to allure him.(5)
She was exhausted performing the charms but the Raja never turned up.
Then, to tempt the Raja she devised a scheme.(6)
She put on the saffron coloured attire, disguising herself as a Jogan, the ascetic, entered
the Royal Court and paid the obeisance.(7)
Arril
The Raja was contented to see an ascetic and thought he could learn a few charms from her.
The Raja sent one of his attendants to learn some magical faculties.(8)
Chaupeyi
The attendant walked over to her house and conveyed her the Raja's intention.
`Please do me a favour and enable me learn some charms.'(9)
Dohira
The Jogan opened her eyes after a period of three hours and said, `If you want to learn the charms then bring the Raja here.(10)
`Past mid-night he should come to us and, with the blessings of Gorakh Nath, he will not go back disappointed.'(11)
Chaupeyi
The attendant conveyed to the Raja by waking him up at past-midnight and brought him to the Jogan.
At the sight of the Raja she sighed with relief.(12)
Dohira
She told the Raja to send all the courtesans away and fetch the festival-lights, flowers and vintage wines.(14)
The Raja ordered all of his people to leave, and stayed alone to seek magical charms.(15)
Chaupeyi
The Raja remained alone with her and she said, `To begin with I will show you a miracle and, thereafter, the magical charms will be taught to you.(16)
Dohira
`I will convert a man into a woman and a woman into a man.
`Becoming a man I will teach you charms and, then turning into a woman I will indulge in sexual play with you.'(17)
Said the Raja
`The man who confers the charms is the father and a woman the mother.
`One should provide them service instead of involving in sexual plays.(18)
Arril
`By rendering service and bowing head in obeisance to the Guru for a long time, with great efforts, the charms are learnt.
`You bow your head before him and to learn you perform playful actions.'(19)
Chaupeyi
Thereafter ascetic added, `To meet you I have disguised myself like this.
`Now you bedeck my bed and enjoy sex with me.(20)
Dohira
`My mind has been craving to meat you and every limb of my body is getting
impassioned.
`O my love! Come to my ravishing bed and enthral me with your company.(21)
`But if you attempt to run away, I will get you caught by shouting "thief" and abuse you
as well.
`Therefore, my love! Forget all the apprehensions and indulge with me in fornication.(22)
`If a woman comes to her husband tormented with the sexual desire,
`And, if she faces disappointment, then, her husband is fit to be thrown into the hell.(23)
`If a person does not grant the benevolence of carnal fulfilment to a sex desirous woman,
then, (that person), deserves to be cast off into hell.(24)
Arril
`God gave me birth into the house of a prostitute and I disguised myself into an ascetic to
meet you.
`Now you be quick and adorn my bed. I am your maid, please don't torment me.(25)
Dohira
`What if you are astute? You must not be proud of your youth.
`I am afflicted with the arrow of separation, don't let it dissipate.(26)
Arril
`Don't lose this opportunity; I am in the grip (of Cupid) and drowning in the sea of
passion up to brim.
`Don't let me drown into the dense and dark cloudy night without sexual fulfilment.(27)
`People come from all the directions and get their mind pleasing aspirations fulfilled, then
what wrong have I done?
`You cannot narrate any as (I have done nothing wrong).
`I am your slave, please come to my bed'.(28)
(The Raja said), `I had come to you to learn the charms but you are playing such a drama.
`Why should I indulge in sex with you?
`By doing this, I am afraid, I will go astray of my righteous path.'
Chaupeyi
The concubine implied numerous ploys, performed various blandishments, and executed
several magical charms,
But she could not win the favour of the Raja.(30)
Arril
Then she jumped out to the courtyard and shouted, `thief, thief,'
To frighten the Raja. As he refused to have sex with her, she wanted to entrap him.(31)
People, hearing the call of `thief', came running.
But she told them that she was shouting in her dream.
When they had gone away, holding Raja's arm she said,
`Either you have sex with me or I will get you trammelled.'(32)
Dohira
Then the Raja contemplated, `It will be wise for me to play some trick to get out of this
place.(33)
`If I run out, my honour is ruined, and if I indulge in sex my Dharma, the righteousness,
is lost.
`Both the paths are arduous, O God, please help me.'(35)
Chaupeyi
`O my love! Listen to me. One's birth is worthless if, after coming across a pretty woman
like you, one abandons her.
`Dishonourable would be the descent of such a person.'(37)
`You, immediately, make the marijuana, cannabis, opium available, and joyfully serve
them with your own hands.(38)
`Yourself, you drink wine, and let me quaff cannabis to enable me to enjoy sex with you
during all the four watches.'(39)
Chaupeyi
Hearing this, that mindless was overwhelmed, and did not comprehend the real motive.
Being too happy, she arranged all the intoxicants which were asked for.(40)

Dohira
The woman brought the marijuana, cannabis and opium, and
Presented to him the thoroughly grounded cannabis along with seven times decanted
wine.(41)
Arril
The Raja had determined the substance of her charm, (and planned,) `After enchanting
her and making her to lie down in the bed.
`Then leaving sixty gold coins, I will run away, and, thus, save my Dharma.(42)
Dohira
`She does not understand the essence of love as money is the only her passion.
`How can a reptile and a prostitute think in good terms of their friends?'(43)
Satisfied and pondering this way, the Raja served her wine in abundance.
To run away he put her, when intoxicated with wine, in the bed.(44)
The Raja had served her the cups full of wine with his own hands and cunningly made
her to sleep.(45)
Arril
He had made her to drink cups after cups of the wine and showed extraordinary affection.
When she went into deep slumber, he put sixty gold coins and took to his way.(46)
If a (strange lady) wants to make love with you, do not show her affection.
One who wants to relish your (sensual) companionship, don't relate with her.
One whose mind is not intelligible enough, don't divulge your inner thought.(47)
Dohira
Intoxicating the woman and leaving sixty gold coins, the Raja ran away.
Without being noticed by anybody he returned and settled down in his own house.(48)
Arriving home, he thanked his luck for saving his Dharma this time and determined,
`Now I will roam around different countries to spread God's exaltations, and swore never to heed to a strange (woman).(49)
Dohira
`The same determination is abiding in my mind and I will never attend to another's woman.(50)(1)
In this Sixteenth Parable of Auspicious Chritars
Conversation of the Raja and the Minister,
Completed with Benediction.(16)(315​
 

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Featured Shabad

The salok is by Sheik Farid ji. Translation by Dr. Sant Singh Khalsa. It appears on Ang 794 of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji.

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ਸੂਹੀ ਲਲਿਤ ॥
Sūhī laliṯ.
Soohee...

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