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Most Influential Sikhs In History And Why? Suggest Your Pick

Most Influential Sikhs in History? plz add to list.

  • Dr. Manmohan Singh

    Votes: 7 17.1%
  • Baba Deep Singh

    Votes: 12 29.3%
  • Banda Singh Bahadur

    Votes: 14 34.1%
  • Maharaja Ranjit Singh

    Votes: 16 39.0%
  • Prof Sahib Singh

    Votes: 11 26.8%
  • Bhagat Puran Singh

    Votes: 10 24.4%
  • Baba Budhha

    Votes: 14 34.1%
  • Sant Jarnail Singh

    Votes: 7 17.1%
  • Master Tara Singh

    Votes: 4 9.8%
  • Bhai Gurdas

    Votes: 13 31.7%
  • Bhai Mani Singh

    Votes: 11 26.8%
  • Sardar Baghel Singh

    Votes: 6 14.6%
  • Bhai Kahan Singh Nabha

    Votes: 6 14.6%
  • Bhai Veer Singh

    Votes: 9 22.0%
  • Bhai Kanihiya Ji

    Votes: 6 14.6%
  • Sardar Hari Singh Nalwa

    Votes: 7 17.1%
  • Shaheed Bhagat Singh

    Votes: 3 7.3%
  • Shaheed Udham Singh

    Votes: 2 4.9%

  • Total voters
    41

Admin Singh

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Jun 1, 2004
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Who according to you, after the Sikh Gurus, is/are the most influential persons in Sikh History and Why? Added here are some of the people who influenced Sikh history from one time other. This list will grow as when you add to the list. Note: If you feel like you can make multiple selections.

Thank you
 

pk70

Writer
SPNer
Feb 25, 2008
1,582
627
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Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

Who according to you is/are the most influential persons in Sikh History and Why? Added here are some of the people who influenced Sikh history from one time other. This list will grow as when you add to the list.

Thank you
A few in my list
Baba Budha
Bhai Gurdas Ji
Bhai Mani Singh ji
Punja Pyare
Banda Bahadur
S. Baghel Singh
Baba Deep Singh
Maharaja Ranjit Singh
Bhai Kahan Singh Nabha
Bhai Veer Singh
Bhagat Puran Singh
Principal Teja Singh
Dr Sahib Singh
 

NavjeetSingh

SPNer
Jan 1, 2009
28
14
Chandigarh
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

Waheguru ji ka khalsa
Waheguru ji ki fateh

The Sikh history is unmatched. We can't compare anybody,like Baba Buddha Ji and Baba Deep Singh Ji. They have played their own part in shaping the Sikh history. All Sikh mentioned above were working when Sikhism was going through different phases. Their acts were according to the time they were present in. They did what the time asked then to do.
So I think putting one on the list and saying him/her to be the most influential is not justified. No body can form a criteria to decide the most influential Sikh.

But we can surely talk about those who are in the present time ,taking into consideration their profession. For example if I talk of singing - ther's no body more influential than Rabbi Shergill . He's the only Punjabi Singer who has kept his Sikh identity. You can read more about him here and also get the lyrics of his songs.

I think I'm able to drive the point home. Is it?
 

Admin Singh

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Jun 1, 2004
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Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

Data do not add upto 100%... creates bad impression about the site and us.
This is a multiple selection poll... so you can select more than one option. Hence the sum may never add up to 100%. :)

Regards
 

spnadmin

1947-2014 (Archived)
SPNer
Jun 17, 2004
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Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

Aman ji

This is really hard. Right now if I could pick only one it would be Bhai Gurdas ji. If I can pick more than one (which we can do) then I need to add some other names. Still thinking about this.
 

spnadmin

1947-2014 (Archived)
SPNer
Jun 17, 2004
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Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

I don't understand why Guru Nanak Dev is not on the list.
 

Admin Singh

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Jun 1, 2004
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Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

Antonia ji, i just rephrased the main post to be more specific. Regards

Being a Forum Leader, you can edit the poll and add to the list. :)
 
Jan 31, 2008
7
5
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

Baba Jujar Singh Ji
Baba Fateh Singh Ji
Baba Ajit Singh Ji
Baba Jorawar Singh Ji
Their contribution to Silh Panth is beyond any description.
 

NavjeetSingh

SPNer
Jan 1, 2009
28
14
Chandigarh
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

Baba Jujar Singh Ji
Baba Fateh Singh Ji
Baba Ajit Singh Ji
Baba Jorawar Singh Ji
Their contribution to Silh Panth is beyond any description.
Oh I can't believe how can other members forgot these superheroes, the unmatched history creators. They should lead the list. I think it's time to re-arrange the list.

NO religion in the world has got such big heroes. At such times I FEEL PROUD TO BE A SIKH.
 

NavjeetSingh

SPNer
Jan 1, 2009
28
14
Chandigarh
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

How were they influential though?

I'm not getting rude, but just asking you - Do you know who were these?

Just to facilitate you-

Baba Fateh Singh and Baba Jorawar Singh were 9 and 7 years old respectively when, they were brought into the court of mughal king ( of the state of Sirhind), they were lured in every way to convert them to Islam. They were even tortured by keeping them in confinement and hungry and thirsty. They were put in a cold cell, surrounded by Ice all around in the nights on December 24,25 when everything freezes out here in Punjab. They had nothing to protect themselves. They were even tricked to convert them into Islam by asking them to get through a small window , on the other side of which Quran was kept. But they knew it and instead of putting their heads out of the window - they put out their feet.

All was done to make them a part of Islam but they denied. They were misinformed that their father - Sahibe Kamal Shri Guru Gobind Singh Ji has been killed in a battle. So they mughals asked them what they will do even if they are left. They replied, " We will gather a strong force and attack your realm."

The heartless ruler ordered to brick the two small children alive. This episode of Sikh History is called - Saka Sirhind.

It was after this that Guru Gobind Singh Ji ordered Baba Banda Singh Bahadur to destroy Sirhind and he did it. Now at the same place, district Fatehgarh Sahib has come up named after the Gurudwara - Gurudwara Fatehgarh Sahib built in the memory of Sahibzadas and their grandmother (Mata Gurjari Ji, mother of Guru Gobind Singh Ji).

This is just the summary. I will definitely put more info in the coming day at my blog.
 
Apr 25, 2006
2,921
1,643
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

I'm not getting rude, but just asking you - Do you know who were these?
That's OK.
Yes, I do.

Just to facilitate you-
Thank you

Baba Fateh Singh and Baba Jorawar Singh were 9 and 7 years old respectively when, they were brought into the court of mughal king ( of the state of Sirhind), they were lured in every way to convert them to Islam. They were even tortured by keeping them in confinement and hungry and thirsty. They were put in a cold cell, surrounded by Ice all around in the nights on December 24,25 when everything freezes out here in Punjab. They had nothing to protect themselves.
You have it right but I doubt there was any ice all around as they would have simply died in such weather.

They were even tricked to convert them into Islam by asking them to get through a small window , on the other side of which Quran was kept. But they knew it and instead of putting their heads out of the window - they put out their feet.
I have never heard this version of the story.
The version I have heard is when they are asked to go through the small opening in the gate. Instead of bowing, they put their feet first and sort of went backwards to enter.

All was done to make them a part of Islam but they denied. They were misinformed that their father - Sahibe Kamal Shri Guru Gobind Singh Ji has been killed in a battle. So they mughals asked them what they will do even if they are left. They replied, " We will gather a strong force and attack your realm."
Yes, that was very brave of them!

The heartless ruler ordered to brick the two small children alive. This episode of Sikh History is called - Saka Sirhind.
Ah, yes.


It was after this that Guru Gobind Singh Ji ordered Baba Banda Singh Bahadur to destroy Sirhind and he did it.
Yes, Guru Sahib did that but his decision wasn't completely based on the Shaheedi of the Sahibzadas. There were many other shaheeds, as well as many other reasons why the Sirhind was made a target.

Now at the same place, district Fatehgarh Sahib has come up named after the Gurudwara - Gurudwara Fatehgarh Sahib built in the memory of Sahibzadas and their grandmother (Mata Gurjari Ji, mother of Guru Gobind Singh Ji).
OK

This is just the summary. I will definitely put more info in the coming day at my blog.
What I was asking is how were the Sahibzadas influential?
"the capacity or power of persons or things to be a compelling force on or produce effects on the actions, behavior, opinions, etc., of others" - www.dictionary.com

I agree that they made great sacrifices and I don't mean to make their sacrifice sound ungreat but I don't think they had much influence on others. They may influence people greatly nowadays but we are talking about history here.
 

NavjeetSingh

SPNer
Jan 1, 2009
28
14
Chandigarh
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

"the capacity or power of persons or things to be a compelling force on or produce effects on the actions, behavior, opinions, etc., of others" - www.dictionary.com
Well Bhagat Singh Ji as far as my understanding is based - the influence you are talking of depend on the mental state of the observer. I don't remember the proper names but the story is - A king who was hiding himself from his enemies in a cave was influenced by the determination of a spider who was trying hard to reach the ceiling of the cave. The king got influenced by a little insect and I have met people who have not even got the point driven home even after reading the translations of Guru's Bani. It all depends on the way you take things, you observe them and the place you put in your head.
Well It may not be 100% true but it is my way of thinking.
One doesn't need a written note to get influenced. New generation (specially the teenagers) here in India can learn from them -to leave their hair uncut. But if they want to. It all depends on them. Their understanding and interpretation of the lives of the Sahibezadas , the children who have written unmatched part of Sikh Histroy.

I would definitely like to hear your views in reply. I'm not talking of a debate , just exchange of views.

Waheguru ji ka khalsa
Waheguru ji ki fateh
 

Randip Singh

Writer
Historian
SPNer
May 25, 2005
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Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

We Must include HS Phoolka.

H. S. Phoolka - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Harvinder Singh Phoolka (commonly known as H. S. Phoolka) is a senior advocate of Delhi High Court, Human Rights activist, and author. He is known for spearheading one of the longest and most tortuous legal[1] "crusades"[2] to gain justice for the victims of 1984 Anti-Sikh massacre and fighting individual cases on the involvement of Congress-I leaders H. K. L. Bhagat, Sajjan Kumar and Jagdish Tytler despite the government cover-up[3][4]. He received threatening letters[5] for unearthing involvements of ruling political party leaders in what the Asian Age called "the Mother of all Cover-ups" in a front page story[3][4] . The special anniversary edition of the Outlook (magazine) included Phoolka in its list of 50 people that make a difference in India, along side Amartya Sen and Abhinav Ghosh[6].

Early life and education

Phoolka's formative years were spent in a small village called Bhadaur in the Sangrur district of Punjab, India[7]. His education began in a small school in his village. He graduated from Ludhiana, and went to Law School in Chandigarh.

[edit] Family

Phoolka married Maninder Kaur in 1983. She is a food technologist and was a 1990 "outstanding graduate" of American Institute of Baking, Kansas[7]. She is said to have declined job offers in the United States and returned to India to support her husband's struggle for justice[7]

[edit] Career

After completing his law degree in Chandigarh, Phoolka landed in Delhi to practice law. He served as member-secretary of the Justice Narula Committee formed in 1993 to probe the carnage[8]. He was later appointed the counsel for Central Government in January 2001[9]. He is known as a lawyer who won't take up a case if he finds that the client is in the wrong[10].

[edit] 1984 Anti-Sikh massacre

Phoolka is well known for spearheading the crusade to seek justice in the 1984 Sikh massacre in New Delhi that followed the assassination of Indira Gandhi and resulted in killing of 2,733 Sikhs within 2 days.[11] He was then just 28 years old and new to practicing law and the city of Delhi.[12] He has put the cause of justice for 1984 Sikh massacre victims before his career[13][9] and family life[13].

[edit] First encounter and escaping the massacre

Phoolka was caught in the massacre while driving pregnant wife Maninder Kaur home on his motorbike. When informed by a friend of the attacks on Sikhs, he avoided the main roads to reach his home in South Delhi via the slums of Kotla Mubarakpur.[14] Phoolka's landlord drove the mob away by telling them that the Phoolka family had left Delhi and hid them in his store room. There the Phoolkas spent 2 days, and came out under escort. They then flew to Chandigarh in the {censored}pit of an overcrowded plane.[15]

[edit] Resolution to fight

Phoolka planned to move his residence to Chandigarh after the riots, but he learned that lawyers were needed to draft affidavits on behalf of the victims, and went to the Farsh Vihar relief camp[16] to help. The sight of orphans, bereaved mothers and wives in the relief camp prompted the Phoolkas to change their plans. Instead of relocating to Chandigarh, they chose to stay and help the victims of the massacre[6]. Since then, Phoolka has fought cases relentlessly[6] for the victims despite government cover-up.[6]

[edit] Formation of Citizens Justice Committee

Phoolka conceived and pursued the formation of the Citizen's Justice Committee (CJC). The CJC served as an umbrella organization for several human rights activists and legal luminaries. Floated in May 1985,[17] the CJC has been pivotal in representing the 1984 anti-Sikh massacre victims before the various judicial commissions that have been formed for inquiry into the massacres. Membership included Justice Ranjit Singh Narula, Soli Sorabjee, General Jagjit Singh Aurora, Justice V. M. Tarkunde and Khushwant Singh[17]. As a counselor for the CJC, Phoolka represented the victims before the first formal sitting of the Mishra Commission on 29th July 1985. The proceedings of the sitting were not made public and were closed to the press.[18] In March 1986, the CJC withdrew its cooperation from the Mishra Commission because it disagreed with the commissions decision to hold secret proceedings, and started filing individual court cases.[19]

[edit] Mooting of Carnage84 website

To make the many documents and findings of Citizens Justice Committee on 1984 Sikh massacre available to the general public, Phoolka mooted the idea of the "Carnage84.com" website, which was launched 10 July 2001 and claimed 1,50,000 visits from people of 30 different countries within 10 days of it going online[20]

[edit] Notable quotes

The fight for justice by the riot victims sent a message that the powerful and the mighty could be challenged and demolished. They were like a rock and riot victims were like ants trying to push the rock. Over the years, with our efforts, we have been able to force the rock to roll and now it rolls like a football the moment we come near it. If we stop in our efforts, it would again become stationary and grow into a mountain[12] ” “ Before the 1984 riots, there were no criminals in politics. Criminals just followed the politicians. But 1984 made them realise people leading mobs and killing others could get elected and become leaders......So a way was opened for criminals to make politics a profession[4]
[edit] Book

Phoolka, along with human rights activist and journalist Manoj Mitta, has written the first account of the 1984 Anti-Sikh massacre in the form of a book titled When a Tree Shook Delhi[21]
 

Randip Singh

Writer
Historian
SPNer
May 25, 2005
2,936
2,948
50
United Kingdom
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

We Must include HS Phoolka.

H. S. Phoolka - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Harvinder Singh Phoolka (commonly known as H. S. Phoolka) is a senior advocate of Delhi High Court, Human Rights activist, and author. He is known for spearheading one of the longest and most tortuous legal[1] "crusades"[2] to gain justice for the victims of 1984 Anti-Sikh massacre and fighting individual cases on the involvement of Congress-I leaders H. K. L. Bhagat, Sajjan Kumar and Jagdish Tytler despite the government cover-up[3][4]. He received threatening letters[5] for unearthing involvements of ruling political party leaders in what the Asian Age called "the Mother of all Cover-ups" in a front page story[3][4] . The special anniversary edition of the Outlook (magazine) included Phoolka in its list of 50 people that make a difference in India, along side Amartya Sen and Abhinav Ghosh[6].

Early life and education

Phoolka's formative years were spent in a small village called Bhadaur in the Sangrur district of Punjab, India[7]. His education began in a small school in his village. He graduated from Ludhiana, and went to Law School in Chandigarh.

[edit] Family

Phoolka married Maninder Kaur in 1983. She is a food technologist and was a 1990 "outstanding graduate" of American Institute of Baking, Kansas[7]. She is said to have declined job offers in the United States and returned to India to support her husband's struggle for justice[7]

[edit] Career

After completing his law degree in Chandigarh, Phoolka landed in Delhi to practice law. He served as member-secretary of the Justice Narula Committee formed in 1993 to probe the carnage[8]. He was later appointed the counsel for Central Government in January 2001[9]. He is known as a lawyer who won't take up a case if he finds that the client is in the wrong[10].

[edit] 1984 Anti-Sikh massacre

Phoolka is well known for spearheading the crusade to seek justice in the 1984 Sikh massacre in New Delhi that followed the assassination of Indira Gandhi and resulted in killing of 2,733 Sikhs within 2 days.[11] He was then just 28 years old and new to practicing law and the city of Delhi.[12] He has put the cause of justice for 1984 Sikh massacre victims before his career[13][9] and family life[13].

[edit] First encounter and escaping the massacre

Phoolka was caught in the massacre while driving pregnant wife Maninder Kaur home on his motorbike. When informed by a friend of the attacks on Sikhs, he avoided the main roads to reach his home in South Delhi via the slums of Kotla Mubarakpur.[14] Phoolka's landlord drove the mob away by telling them that the Phoolka family had left Delhi and hid them in his store room. There the Phoolkas spent 2 days, and came out under escort. They then flew to Chandigarh in the {censored}pit of an overcrowded plane.[15]

[edit] Resolution to fight

Phoolka planned to move his residence to Chandigarh after the riots, but he learned that lawyers were needed to draft affidavits on behalf of the victims, and went to the Farsh Vihar relief camp[16] to help. The sight of orphans, bereaved mothers and wives in the relief camp prompted the Phoolkas to change their plans. Instead of relocating to Chandigarh, they chose to stay and help the victims of the massacre[6]. Since then, Phoolka has fought cases relentlessly[6] for the victims despite government cover-up.[6]

[edit] Formation of Citizens Justice Committee

Phoolka conceived and pursued the formation of the Citizen's Justice Committee (CJC). The CJC served as an umbrella organization for several human rights activists and legal luminaries. Floated in May 1985,[17] the CJC has been pivotal in representing the 1984 anti-Sikh massacre victims before the various judicial commissions that have been formed for inquiry into the massacres. Membership included Justice Ranjit Singh Narula, Soli Sorabjee, General Jagjit Singh Aurora, Justice V. M. Tarkunde and Khushwant Singh[17]. As a counselor for the CJC, Phoolka represented the victims before the first formal sitting of the Mishra Commission on 29th July 1985. The proceedings of the sitting were not made public and were closed to the press.[18] In March 1986, the CJC withdrew its cooperation from the Mishra Commission because it disagreed with the commissions decision to hold secret proceedings, and started filing individual court cases.[19]

[edit] Mooting of Carnage84 website

To make the many documents and findings of Citizens Justice Committee on 1984 Sikh massacre available to the general public, Phoolka mooted the idea of the "Carnage84.com" website, which was launched 10 July 2001 and claimed 1,50,000 visits from people of 30 different countries within 10 days of it going online[20]

[edit] Notable quotes

The fight for justice by the riot victims sent a message that the powerful and the mighty could be challenged and demolished. They were like a rock and riot victims were like ants trying to push the rock. Over the years, with our efforts, we have been able to force the rock to roll and now it rolls like a football the moment we come near it. If we stop in our efforts, it would again become stationary and grow into a mountain[12] ” “ Before the 1984 riots, there were no criminals in politics. Criminals just followed the politicians. But 1984 made them realise people leading mobs and killing others could get elected and become leaders......So a way was opened for criminals to make politics a profession[4]
[edit] Book

Phoolka, along with human rights activist and journalist Manoj Mitta, has written the first account of the 1984 Anti-Sikh massacre in the form of a book titled When a Tree Shook Delhi[21]
 
Feb 5, 2009
38
34
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

Does it mean which Sikh was the most influential Sikh within the panth or outside of the panth
 

Admin Singh

Admin
SPNer
Jun 1, 2004
6,564
5,182
SPN
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

basically, the idea is to create a database of influential sikhs who molded sikh history... we will be opening a special section dedicated to such sikhs soon... within or outside the panth does not matter... just add to the list...

Regards
 
Nov 17, 2006
63
94
Perth, western Australia
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

i would like to add the name of bhai kahnia ji who saw God in every human being. He was the starter of Red cross. Sewa Panthi sect of bhai Knhia is doing a tremendous service.manas ki jat sabhe eke pahichanbo was the message of Guru Gobind singh ji who lived this message.
 

NavjeetSingh

SPNer
Jan 1, 2009
28
14
Chandigarh
Re: Most Influential Sikhs in History and Why? Plz Add to List

i would like to add the name of bhai kahnia ji who saw God in every human being. He was the starter of Red cross. Sewa Panthi sect of bhai Knhia is doing a tremendous service.manas ki jat sabhe eke pahichanbo was the message of Guru Gobind singh ji who lived this message.

I wonder how could be forgot him?
 

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