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Introducing Myself

dalvindersingh grewal

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My name is Dalvinder Singh. I am from Ludhiana Punjab. I was brought up in a Sikhi environment. I developed my knowledge about Sikhism gradually and studied various scripture including supreme Sikh scripture Sri Guru Granth Sahib To understand better I translated Japuji Sahib in English and cleared my concepts. Now I meditate regularly especially early in the morning daily. I have studied Guru Nanak the most. I traveled to almost all the places in the world where Guru Nanak had gone and published books. Now I am writing an encyclopedia on Guru Nanak. It has given me great peace. I treat all equal and do service to the society as much as I can. I have not harmed anyone; if it had happened unknowingly I cannot say. I have 2 sons and 2 grandsons and 2 granddaughters. All are living happily. early I used to pray to God if I needed something; which was generally fulfilled. Now I and my wife have stopped requesting God for any worldly things except His Name, I have been working for the poor especially the Sikligars, Wanjara, and Satnamis (about 10 crores) for last 40 years. I had been able to make people aware of their pitiable condition globally through my writing. I have working to ensure that they get five things in each area of their concentration. These include a school for children, training for men and women since their present profession is not able to earn them the bread, a dispensary and a place of worship as per their requirement. God and God's men have now come up in large numbers and working individually and collectively. I have been lucky to bless in doing a bit for them. I have complete faith in one God and my Gurus and the writings of Sri Guru Granth Sahib. God has been very kind to keep me off from all worries and I live a very satisfied life. I pray for happiness of all.
 

dalvindersingh grewal

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ਸੰਤ ਦੀ ਨੂਰ ਅਵਸਥਾ
ਡਾ: ਦਲਵਿੰਦਰ ਸਿੰਘ ਗ੍ਰੇਵਾਲ
ਨਾ ਮੈਂ ਹੁਣ ਮਜ਼ਲੂਮ ਰਿਹਾ ਹਾਂ, ਨਾਂ ਮੈਂ ਹੁਣ ਮਜਬੂਰ ਹਾਂ।
ਜਦ ਤੇਰੇ ਨਾਲ ਪੈ ਗਿਆ ਬੰਧਨ, ਹਰ ਬੰਧਨ ਤੋਂ ਦੂਰ ਹਾਂ।
ਭੁਲ ਗਿਆ ਹੈ ਅਪਣਾ ਆਪਾ, ਯਾਦ ਤੇਰੀ ਹੀ ਰਹਿੰਦੀ ਹੈ,
ਤੇਰੀ ਇਸ ਕ੍ਰਿਪਾ ਦਾ ਸਦਕਾ, ਮੈਂ ਤੇਰਾ ਮਸ਼ਕੂਰ ਹਾਂ।
ਲਗਦਾ ਹਰ ਕੋਈ ਰੂਪ ਹੈ ਤੇਰਾ, ਬੁਰਾ ਨਾ ਲਗਦਾ ਕੋਈ ਏ,
ਵਿਸਰ ਗਈ ਦੁਨੀਆਂ ਦੀ ਮਾਇਆ, ਭੁਲਾ ਜਗ ਦਸਤੂਰ ਹਾਂ;
ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਨਾਲ ਧੋਤਾ ਅੰਦਰ, ਅੰਦਰ ਹੀ ਹੁਣ ਮੰਦਰ ਹੈ,
ਹਰ ਥਾਂ ਤੇ ਬਸ ਤੂੰ ਹੀ ਦਿਸਦਾ, ਖੁਦ ਵੀ ਮੈਂ ਭਰਪੂਰ ਹਾਂ।
ਖੋਕੇ ਤੇਰੇ ਵਿਚ ਮਿਲਦਾ ਹੈ ਜੋ ਆਨੰਦ ਨਾ ਕਹਿ ਸਕਦਾਂ,
ਲਗਦੈ ਨੂਰ ‘ਚ ਮਿਲਕੇ ਹੋਇਆ ਮੈਂ ਵੀ ਨੂਰੋ ਨੂਰ ਹਾਂ।
 
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This is intoduction of myself as a new member. My name is Arran Smith. I am a spiritual seeker, and I'd like to think, a searcher for truth as well. I am from St. Louis, Missouri, raised in a God-fearing home. My belief is to love God. I was attracted to this site when I did a Google search for the word Samadhi. I had for a while been enchanted with the concept of Samyama as defined by Patanjali. When I saw the definition of Samadhi as given by a Sikh mad of God it reached heart and intellect so that I believe receiving true knowledge from this source is part of my path and of my true will. Thank you.
 

Admin Singh

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Welcome Arran! We hope to learn from your life's experiences and wish you enjoy your stay over here.

Thank you
 
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Waheguru ji Ka khalsa.. waheguru ji ki fateh.. my name is harshpreet Singh.. n I m from Ludhiana... Punjab.. Nd this is my introduction as a new member.. Nd I would to be as part of this family... Nd I am here to learn more new things abt sikhi... As we all know that sikhi means sikhna... So bhave Jo v koi kinna vadda kyu n ho jave.. sikhi nu oo poori chngi trah ni Jaan skda.. ess lyi.. sannu hmesha sikhde rhna chahida. Nd oos guru sahib ji de bhane nu Mann na chahida...
Waheguru ji ka khalsa... Waheguru ji fateh
 

Simran Sidhu

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Sat Sri Akāl Members, my name is Simran Sidhu. I am a Sikh filmmaker (writer-director) born and based in London, U.K.

I have spent my life asking questions about Sikhi that many people seem unable or unwilling to answer.

The problem started when my parents explained Sikhi to the six-year-old Simran like this:

"When Guru Nānak was born, people believed in superstitions, in lots of different gods, and people from different religions were fighting with each other. So Guru Nānak taught people to stop being superstitious, to believe in just one God, and to love everyone...because we are all children of the same God."

The problem was that the janam sakhian (life stories) of the Gurus, which my parents would give me to read as innocuous bedtime stories as a child, contained things that even my half-formed brain recognised as a form of "superstition".

The sakhi of Guru Nānak spinning Mecca on its axis, for example, formed the basis of one of many questions that would drive my parents and other senior family members crazy with my insistence on them providing an explanation that was in line with the "no superstition" version of Sikhi that parents had initially told me about.

"When you meditate on God, you get these kinds of powers," people would say.

I left open the possibility that this may well be the case, that maybe I just wasn't privvy to all the metaphysical workings of the universe that were accessible to "spiritually accomplished" men and women.

But it still didn't explain why Guru Nānak felt the need to unnecessarily display these abilities, especially when he refused to display "miracles" in front of the master yogis in the Sidh Goshat, and speaks at length in Gurbāni about the irrelevance of ridhian sidhian.

I started to question the validity of these sakhis (as a child, I didn't even know that this is what these supposedly "historical" events were called), wondering if – like Chinese Whispers – these events had changed in the process of their telling and re-telling over hundreds of years.

But I stuck a bookmark in these issues and went about my life...

...until I got into an animated discussion with a Hindu Panjabi gentleman on Facebook who claimed to be a student of the Udassi movement and said that Guru Nānak never rejected Pandit Hardyal's janeu and that all the Gurus lived within Hindu rassam ravāj and were, for all intents and purposes, Hindu.

He cited the "B40 janamsakhi" among others (remember, I'd never heard the term janamsakhi until this point) which then opened the door to my learning about Max Authur MacCauliffe's rejection of the janamsakhis as "deviations" of "spurious authorship".

Suddenly, everything I had been taught about the Gurus since childhood was thrown into question.

My doubts were beginning to be proved right.

And then...

...I came across Dr. Karminder Singh Dhillon.

Here was a man who expressed all the concerns I had for the inconsistencies of the Gurus' life stories. In addition to that, he also translated and explained passages of Gurbāni that I had also felt sounded suspect for many years.

And he had citations.

His historical dilineation of how the Sikh Panth was reinterpreted through the lens of Yogic, Puranic and Vedic paradigms to distort the original message of Gurbāni begins at least to explain the inconsistencies that had troubled me since childhood.

Since Gurbāni uses the language of its time(s) and place(s) – as all texts must – it appears Sikhs may have lost the forest for the trees, focussing on references to Vedic words, to Yogic concepts, and to Puranic deities, and jumping to the conclusion that these traditions are foundational to Guru Nānak's paradigm.

This doesn't mean I have completely ruled out the possibility of supernatural occurenes. It just means that, with Dr. Dhillon's work, I am able to at least form a line of enquiry about it.

Nor is this to denegrate other peoples' religious worldviews. The Gurus and Shaheeds sacrificed their lives and the lives of their families for other peoples' Freedom of Religion, after all.

But that also means that we Sikhs should have the freedom to ask questions about our own religion, and to decide what is "authentic Sikhi", as Dr. Karminder Dhillon phrases it, and what is a distortion.

These are my cards on the table. My heart on my sleeve. My soul bared.

So be gentle.

Sat Sri Akāl.
 
Last edited:

Ishna

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Well met @Simran Sidhu ! I'm pleased to read your journey so far, thank you for sharing it. Welcome to SPN :)

How lucky it was that your parents planted a seed of truth in you at an early age, and that you had the where-with-all to treasure it and use it as a measure of truth. Congratulations on persisting and following the trail on to the good stuff.

I look forward to engaging with you more on the forum. Dr. Dhillon's work is very helpful. Have you also encountered the late Baldev Singh's work Nanakian Philosophy? You might have learned past it already, but it's one of my favourite resources and it might be of interest to you, too.
 

sukhsingh

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Sat Sri Akāl Members, my name is Simran Sidhu. I am a Sikh filmmaker (writer-director) born and based in London, U.K.

I have spent my life asking questions about Sikhi that many people seem unable or unwilling to answer.

The problem started when my parents explained Sikhi to the six-year-old Simran like this:

"When Guru Nānak was born, people believed in superstitions, in lots of different gods, and people from different religions were fighting with each other. So Guru Nānak taught people to stop being superstitious, to believe in just one God, and to love everyone...because we are all children of the same God."

The problem was that the janam sakhian (life stories) of the Gurus, which my parents would give me to read as innocuous bedtime stories as a child, contained things that even my half-formed brain recognised as a form of "superstition".

The sakhi of Guru Nānak spinning Mecca on its axis, for example, formed the basis of one of many questions that would drive my parents and other senior family members crazy with my insistence on them providing an explanation that was in line with the "no superstition" version of Sikhi that parents had initially told me about.

"When you meditate on God, you get these kinds of powers," people would say.

I left open the possibility that this may well be the case, that maybe I just wasn't privvy to all the metaphysical workings of the universe that were accessible to "spiritually accomplished" men and women.

But it still didn't explain why Guru Nānak felt the need to unnecessarily display these abilities, especially when he refused to display "miracles" in front of the master yogis in the Sidh Goshat, and speaks at length in Gurbāni about the irrelevance of ridhian sidhian.

I started to question the validity of these sakhis (as a child, I didn't even know that this is what these supposedly "historical" events were called), wondering if – like Chinese Whispers – these events had changed in the process of their telling and re-telling over hundreds of years.

But I stuck a bookmark in these issues and went about my life...

...until I got into an animated discussion with a Hindu Panjabi gentleman on Facebook who claimed to be a student of the Udassi movement and said that Guru Nānak never rejected Pandit Hardyal's janeu and that all the Gurus lived within Hindu rassam ravāj and were, for all intents and purposes, Hindu.

He cited the "B40 janamsakhi" among others (remember, I'd never heard the term janamsakhi until this point) which then opened the door to my learning about Max Authur MacCauliffe's rejection of the janamsakhis as "deviations" of "spurious authorship".

Suddenly, everything I had been taught about the Gurus since childhood was thrown into question.

My doubts were beginning to be proved right.

And then...

...I came across Dr. Karminder Singh Dhillon.

Here was a man who expressed all the concerns I had for the inconsistencies of the Gurus' life stories. In addition to that, he also translated and explained passages of Gurbāni that I had also felt sounded suspect for many years.

And he had citations.

His historical dilineation of how the Sikh Panth was reinterpreted through the lens of Yogic, Puranic and Vedic paradigms to distort the original message of Gurbāni begins at least to explain the inconsistencies that had troubled me since childhood.

Since Gurbāni uses the language of its time(s) and place(s) – as all texts must – it appears Sikhs may have lost the forest for the trees, focussing on references to Vedic words, to Yogic concepts, and to Puranic deities, and jumping to the conclusion that these traditions are foundational to Guru Nānak's paradigm.

This doesn't mean I have completely ruled out the possibility of supernatural occurenes. It just means that, with Dr. Dhillon's work, I am able to at least form a line of enquiry about it.

Nor is this to denegrate other peoples' religious worldviews. The Gurus and Shaheeds sacrificed their lives and the lives of their families for other peoples' Freedom of Religion, after all.

But that also means that we Sikhs should have the freedom to ask questions about our own religion, and to decide what is "authentic Sikhi", as Dr. Karminder Dhillon phrases it, and what is a distortion.

These are my cards on the table. My heart on my sleeve. My soul bared.

So be gentle.

Sat Sri Akāl.
Very pleased to meet you
 

Simran Sidhu

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Well met @Simran Sidhu ! I'm pleased to read your journey so far, thank you for sharing it. Welcome to SPN :)
Thank you for the warm welcome, Ishna. It's great to be here :)

How lucky it was that your parents planted a seed of truth in you at an early age, and that you had the where-with-all to treasure it and use it as a measure of truth. Congratulations on persisting and following the trail on to the good stuff.
Thanks again. I do feel lucky to have been given such a strong and simple basic grasp of Sikhi by my parents.

I've done plenty of reading and thinking in my own time, and Gurbāni really started to click in university. Other philosophical content I was reading and watching helped me to understand where Sikhi had positioned itself, and I soon realised the genius of Guru Nānak's thinking and how it was by far superior to anything produced during the European Enlightenment.

I look forward to engaging with you more on the forum. Dr. Dhillon's work is very helpful. Have you also encountered the late Baldev Singh's work Nanakian Philosophy? You might have learned past it already, but it's one of my favourite resources and it might be of interest to you, too.
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll make my way through it.

I remember using the term "Nānakian Philosophy" when I was semi-active on Sikh forums under a different username about a decade ago. I was chased away then for using such a "pseudo-intellectual terminology", for voicing "unorthodox views", and I was outright banned from some forums for promoting "anti-Sikh views".

Glad to see things have changed :)
 

simRan4175@@

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Sat Sri Akāl Members, my name is Simran Sidhu. I am a Sikh filmmaker (writer-director) born and based in London, U.K.

I have spent my life asking questions about Sikhi that many people seem unable or unwilling to answer.

The problem started when my parents explained Sikhi to the six-year-old Simran like this:

"When Guru Nānak was born, people believed in superstitions, in lots of different gods, and people from different religions were fighting with each other. So Guru Nānak taught people to stop being superstitious, to believe in just one God, and to love everyone...because we are all children of the same God."

The problem was that the janam sakhian (life stories) of the Gurus, which my parents would give me to read as innocuous bedtime stories as a child, contained things that even my half-formed brain recognised as a form of "superstition".

The sakhi of Guru Nānak spinning Mecca on its axis, for example, formed the basis of one of many questions that would drive my parents and other senior family members crazy with my insistence on them providing an explanation that was in line with the "no superstition" version of Sikhi that parents had initially told me about.

"When you meditate on God, you get these kinds of powers," people would say.

I left open the possibility that this may well be the case, that maybe I just wasn't privvy to all the metaphysical workings of the universe that were accessible to "spiritually accomplished" men and women.

But it still didn't explain why Guru Nānak felt the need to unnecessarily display these abilities, especially when he refused to display "miracles" in front of the master yogis in the Sidh Goshat, and speaks at length in Gurbāni about the irrelevance of ridhian sidhian.

I started to question the validity of these sakhis (as a child, I didn't even know that this is what these supposedly "historical" events were called), wondering if – like Chinese Whispers – these events had changed in the process of their telling and re-telling over hundreds of years.

But I stuck a bookmark in these issues and went about my life...

...until I got into an animated discussion with a Hindu Panjabi gentleman on Facebook who claimed to be a student of the Udassi movement and said that Guru Nānak never rejected Pandit Hardyal's janeu and that all the Gurus lived within Hindu rassam ravāj and were, for all intents and purposes, Hindu.

He cited the "B40 janamsakhi" among others (remember, I'd never heard the term janamsakhi until this point) which then opened the door to my learning about Max Authur MacCauliffe's rejection of the janamsakhis as "deviations" of "spurious authorship".

Suddenly, everything I had been taught about the Gurus since childhood was thrown into question.

My doubts were beginning to be proved right.

And then...

...I came across Dr. Karminder Singh Dhillon.

Here was a man who expressed all the concerns I had for the inconsistencies of the Gurus' life stories. In addition to that, he also translated and explained passages of Gurbāni that I had also felt sounded suspect for many years.

And he had citations.

His historical dilineation of how the Sikh Panth was reinterpreted through the lens of Yogic, Puranic and Vedic paradigms to distort the original message of Gurbāni begins at least to explain the inconsistencies that had troubled me since childhood.

Since Gurbāni uses the language of its time(s) and place(s) – as all texts must – it appears Sikhs may have lost the forest for the trees, focussing on references to Vedic words, to Yogic concepts, and to Puranic deities, and jumping to the conclusion that these traditions are foundational to Guru Nānak's paradigm.

This doesn't mean I have completely ruled out the possibility of supernatural occurenes. It just means that, with Dr. Dhillon's work, I am able to at least form a line of enquiry about it.

Nor is this to denegrate other peoples' religious worldviews. The Gurus and Shaheeds sacrificed their lives and the lives of their families for other peoples' Freedom of Religion, after all.

But that also means that we Sikhs should have the freedom to ask questions about our own religion, and to decide what is "authentic Sikhi", as Dr. Karminder Dhillon phrases it, and what is a distortion.

These are my cards on the table. My heart on my sleeve. My soul bared.

So be gentle.

Sat Sri Akāl.
Simran ji, thanks for laying out your thoughts and questions so beautifully. It seems to me that an open and questioning mind is a prerequisite for any spiritual advancement. Guru Nanak questioned. I read somewhere that questioning is the can opener of consciousness. Keep questioning. Questioning is questing. I do think that we take Sakhis literally and that is where our troubles begin. But I would not dismiss them. It is our collective imagination trying to convey a truth. We dont live by logic alone. Chardi Kala
 
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I have been working for the poor especially the Sikligars, Wanjara, and Satnamis (about 10 crores) for last 40 years. I had been able to make people aware of their pitiable condition globally through my writing. I have working to ensure that they get five things in each area of their concentration. These include a school for children, training for men and women since their present profession is not able to earn them the bread, a dispensary and a place of worship as per their requirement. God and God's men have now come up in large numbers and working individually and collectively. I have been lucky to bless in doing a bit for them. I have complete faith in one God and my Gurus and the writings of Sri Guru Granth Sahib. God has been very kind to keep me off from all worries and I live a very satisfied life. I pray for happiness of all.
Sir, it's nice to know you are working for Sikligars. How you came into their contact? Which areas/state do you visit?
 

MJALLI

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Hello Simran, I read about your confusions about Gůrū Nȧnạk D̪év jē's (ਗੁਰੂ ਨਾਨਕ ਦੇਵ ਜੀ) visit to Middle East countries and rotation of Mecca. Please email me directly and I will send you a book which is a hand written documented evidence by a Muslim author who accompanied Gůrū Nȧnạk D̪év jē during his full stay in those countries. Another Muslim turned Sikh copied these notes from the museum in Saudi Arabia and a gentleman from Canada has published this book. I would also like to be in touch with you to discuss my efforts of Transliteration and translation of Gůrbȧnē with correct pronunciation and text. I found English versions of Gůrbȧnē way deficient e.g. writing ਗੁਨ as Gun, ਜੁਗ as Jug, ਤਿਨ as Tin, ਮਨ as Men,ਬਡ as Bed etc. I am making a humble effort to transliterate these words as Gůn, Jůg, T̪ĭn, Mǝn, Bǝd, etc. You might have noticed the way I have spelled Gurbani and Nanak etc. Manjit mjalli51@gmail.com
 

MJALLI

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The site is prompting me to give an introduction of my self. Well, what introduction can a person with NO VIRTUES can give? Still, very humbly, I will put down a few words - I am engineer by education. Worked in the USA for 27 years and quit my job as a Project Director to do English Transliteration and Translation of Sree Gůrū Grạnth Sȧhĭb. When I read the published English translations, I was a bit perturbed to see that the published translations have paid no attention to the Gůrbȧnē grammar. Words like ਸਤਿਗੁਰਿ - sətĕgůrĕ ਸਤਗੁਰਿ - sət̪gůrĕ ਸਤਿਗੁਰ - sətĕgůr ਸਤਿਗੁਰੁ - sət̪ĕgůrŭ ਸਤਗੁਰੁ - sət̪gůrŭ are all written as Satgur. It was disturbing. I am using phonology and phonetics to make an attempt to eliminate such irregularities. I am presently in India to finish my work.
 
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o/~ I walk a lonely road
The only one that I have ever known
Don't know where it goes
But it's home to me, and I walk alone
I walk this empty street
On the Boulevard of Broken Dreams
Where the city sleeps
And I'm the only one, and I walk alone
I walk alone, I walk alone
I walk alone, I walk alone
Guru Granth's the only one that walks beside me
My shallow heart's the only thing that's beating
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
Till then I walk alone o/~

Hello, I'm known as Commander Jones Tako on the intertubes and my Arab name is Sidi Mehemet Ibrahim. if you recognize my name then you should know me.
Needless to say I'm not ethnic Sikh. I was born into a (native) American culture. I'm the only one of my family that still identifies as Native American. As far as I know I'm the last of my tribe. I use to consider myself tribeless. While searching for cases of the Red Cross being brought up on charges of treason I found the story of Bhai Kanhaiya and started reading the SGGS, I had first heard of Sikhism on the PSAs for the security after 9/11 joked that I should be a Sikh because I always refused to get my hair cut on religious grounds, little did I know how right I was. But looking into the Sikh community I found that Sikhs, like Dr Karminder Singh realized, don't know what Nanak taught.
Maybe there are true Sikh in this world still but it seamed unlikely that I would ever meet any, but then heard about Bobby Henderson and what he did with one satirical letter of protest. I'd learned in high school that I group of one is a vary different thing that a person on his own, the weight of leadership didn't seem worth it at the time, but now I know that one can be the start of a large community. I have given up on the name 'Sikh' to me Sikhism is just a bunch of customs and norms that have been completely divorced from Guru Nanak's Sikhi. So I founded the Wholly Marines, taking Dr. Karminder's advice that we should look at stuff through the lens of the SGGS and if they agree with it's message they can be kept and if they disagree with it they should be discarded to heart, I'm taking that approach not just to Sikhism but to everything. Maybe the Wholly Marines will die with me, all I can do is keep them alive in me and make it easier for future people to become one if they so choose, at least now with books it doesn't have to be past down to immediately succeeding generations.
It's tiring being the trailblazer but if I keep it up long enough some fool will start to follow the easy path I've made for them, then they will be too committed and have to take the lead while I seat back as the navigator.
o/~ Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
Till then I walk alone o/~
 

Amahajan

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My name is Apurav Mahajan. I live in Kapurthala, Punjab. I was brought up in a Hindu environment! But as my friends and my father's friends are Sikhs, so i was naturally attracted towards Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji. I admire Sri Guru Nanak Dev Ji but i would not say I am his disciple because following all his instructions is difficult. Even some of the modern day Sikhs are unable to follow Sikhi completely and they become Black spot on the religion. Some of the famous examples would be the singers who though use Babe di kripa nal.... etc but are just opposite to what he said.

Next, I have read SGGS not completely though. I know nothing much about Sikhi but aim to know through this website and correct my doubts.

I am devotee of Sri Krishna, the Para Brahma!
Hare Krishna!
Vaheguru ji!
 

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