I Considered Cutting My Hair

Admin

SPNer
Jun 1, 2004
6,668
5,241
SPN
How do I edit previous posts? Or is that feature disabled?

Thank you

After a few days, it is not possible to edit the older posts as this ruins the flow of the ongoing discussion at the point or moment... if you want to make an amendment you can always quote the older post and present your new viewpoint on the topic. :welcomemunda:

Gurfateh!
 

kanwaljs

SPNer
Nov 12, 2009
15
19
Delhi
Dear OpenmindedSikhji,
Guru Nanak's Baani says, "Balihari Kudrat vassia, Tera Ant na jayi lakhia", "Aapi ney Kudrat saaj kay Aasan ditho chao". So Guru Nanak says the one form of God is Nirankar and the other form is His Kudrat. Kudrat has grown hairs on human body. If anybody cuts his hairs many times, hairs grows again and again at his body. It means God likes that human beings be with hairs on his body. Guru Nanak also says about 'Bhana' (the will of God), 'Hukam' and 'Nimarta'. All of these great values implies that Sikh must keep his hairs willingly and happily. Sikh was keeping his hairs from the time of Guru Nanak but Guru Gobind Singh ji firmly applied the rules from Gurbani. In Japji Sahib Guru Nanak also says, "Hukam rajai chalna, Nanak likhiya naal" i.e. one should follow the laws of nature, respect and safeguard the nature. Before Gurbani, in Moolmantar 'Karta Purakh' means only God is complete in every sense and all others are incomplete, and God has made nature and nature grows hairs. If anybody cuts his hairs and this way go against His nature and disrespect this great value of God i.e. Karta Purakh (Karta jo apni krit vich Paripuran hai).
That is why Sikhs keep their hairs willingly and happily.
Kanwaljit Singh (kanwaljs):singhsippingcoffee:
 
Last edited:

Harry Haller

Panga Master
SPNer
Jan 31, 2011
5,769
8,190
52
Dear OpenmindedSikhji,
We all have listened the sakhis of Panja Sahib i.e. Guru Nanak's hand impression in stone; at Ritha Sahib, the bitter Rithas became sweet and are still sweet. This shows that nature bends (changes laws of nature) at Guru Nanak; although laws of nature never changes. We never thought why nature bends at Guru Nanak? Because Guru Nanak also bends at Nature. Guru Nanak's Baani says, "Balihari Kudrat vassia, Tera Ant na jayi lakhia", "Aapi ney Kudrat saaj kay Aasan ditho chao". So Guru Nanak says the one form of God is Nirankar and the other form is His Kudrat. Kudrat has grown hairs on human body. If anybody cuts his hairs many times, hairs grows again and again at his body. It means God likes that human beings be with hairs on his body. Guru Nanak also says about 'Bhana' (the will of God), 'Hukam' and 'Nimarta'. All of these great values implies that Sikh must keep his hairs willingly and happily. Sikh was keeping his hairs from the time of Guru Nanak but Guru Gobind Singh ji firmly applied the rules from Gurbani. In Japji Sahib Guru Nanak also says, "Hukam rajai chalna, Nanak likhiya naal" i.e. one should follow the laws of nature, respect and safeguard the nature. Before Gurbani, in Moolmantar 'Karta Purakh' means only God is complete in every sense and all others are incomplete, and God has made nature and nature grows hairs. If anybody cuts his hairs and this way go against His nature and disrespect this great value of God i.e. Karta Purakh (Karta jo apni krit vich Paripuran hai).
That is why Sikhs keep their hairs willingly and happily.
Kanwaljit Singh (kanwaljs):singhsippingcoffee:

Kanwaljitji

I find that the beauty of Sikhism is that everything is visible, tangible and above board, thus we have little need for celestial angels, winged horses or the whole array of objects that defy the laws of nature.

So what is our calling card? In my view, none, just the truth plain and simple,.

I do not think Guru Nanakji did any bending of natures laws, I believe that his message was enough to sway people , I do not believe he needed to draw rabbits out of hats. Your post does not need to rely on such for its message, the points you have raised are good enough even without the sakhis.
 

kanwaljs

SPNer
Nov 12, 2009
15
19
Delhi
Kanwaljitji

I find that the beauty of Sikhism is that everything is visible, tangible and above board, thus we have little need for celestial angels, winged horses or the whole array of objects that defy the laws of nature.

So what is our calling card? In my view, none, just the truth plain and simple,.

I do not think Guru Nanakji did any bending of natures laws, I believe that his message was enough to sway people , I do not believe he needed to draw rabbits out of hats. Your post does not need to rely on such for its message, the points you have raised are good enough even without the sakhis.
I agree with you and now I have edited my post and eliminated sakhi from that.
 

NavKaur

SPNer
Jun 18, 2014
10
20
Hello brother,

I think it depends on why you are cutting it, I know how hard it can be for brother to keep hair when society is telling you it is something to disgusted about, but whatever the reason you decide to cut your hair, don't do it for someone else, because society's standards always change. But God is always there and will always be there. If you feel closer to the One who is timeless by keeping your hair, than what could be wrong with that. Hope the decision will be easy for you.
 

Inderjeet Kaur

Writer
SPNer
Oct 13, 2011
869
1,764
Seattle, Washington, USA
Without reading through the prior 19 pages, I have a thought coming from a slightly different direction. What I have to say has nothing to do with religion really. Perhaps it goes back to the hippie era.

When I have any experience, I like to go as deeply into that experience as possible.

Being a Sikh is an experience in this life. A large part of that experience will be missing if one doesn't keep kesh.
 

namritanevaeh

Writer
SPNer
Oct 14, 2012
220
303
Surrey, Canada
This is an old post. I hope you have found peace by now no matter what, but I think you need to do what makes you and your body comfortable. I agree you can be an awesome person without long hair. I've known many. :)
 

Inderjeet Kaur

Writer
SPNer
Oct 13, 2011
869
1,764
Seattle, Washington, USA
We are NOT all equal. In fact, I very much doubt if any two of us are equal. We all have equal value as human beings and ought to have equal rights, but equality is a myth. Equality is an abstract concept that cannot be measured. Equal rights are clearly defined.

We all have talents and possibilities we can develop. Some of us are better Sikhs than others, just as some of us are better athletes or better scholars. By practicing, I can become a better athlete or a better scholar or a better Sikh, but no matter what I do, I will not equal Beckham or Einstein or Baba Deep Singh.

There is very little in Sikhi or anything else that all of us can do perfectly, but there is one thing: we can all keep kesh. It is so simple. Hairs grow on their own; we need do nothing. Of course, we keep them neat and clean, but the actually growing is completely natural.

Think on that a bit. The one thing we can do perfectly, we refuse to do. :kaurfacepalm:
 

KaranKhurana

SPNer
Aug 23, 2014
4
1
Discussion about cutting hair is going here then i think why create another thread for the same. I am also thinking to trim my beard as it is not growing equally from all sides and not thick as i want. Any way i can grow it as i want.
 

ActsOfGod

Writer
SPNer
Aug 14, 2012
387
527
Discussion about cutting hair is going here then i think why create another thread for the same. I am also thinking to trim my beard as it is not growing equally from all sides and not thick as i want. Any way i can grow it as i want.

I am thinking about getting a cup of coffee to drink. It's in the afternoon and I'm starting to feel tired and need something to keep me awake. Any way, I can drink coffee if I want, it's a personal choice.

Dear Mr. Khurana ji, what's the point of coming to this forum and making such an announcement? Are you hoping to get involved in a debate or argument with people attempting to convince you not to trim your beard, then win the debate by convincing them and somehow validate to yourself that now it's ok to do so? Are you thinking that will ease your conscious?

There are innumerable reasons and rationale that people offer for wanting to trim, cut, shave, etc. If you've already made up your mind, nobody is stopping you. You don't need "permission" from anyone here. After all, it is your body and your choice.

What you do is not between you and SPN. It's between you and your Guru. If you say you are a Humanist and don't follow Sikhi and the Guru Sahib's, then that's fine. My only request would be that you be a genuine humanist, and don't pretend to be a Sikh. If you desire to be a Sikh, be a genuine Sikh.

There is no doubt, the path is difficult. But then again, this whole existence is treacherous. I would much rather be holding onto Guru Sahib's hand guiding me along the way than trying to figure things out on my own, groping desperately in the dark. Been there, done that -- it's fruitless, and it's a life of anguish.

Wishing you all the best Mr. Khurana ji. I offer you only this: when the time comes that you find your own strength has failed you, then join your hands together and pray to the Eternal Lord.

AoG
 

FenceSitter

SPNer
Jan 4, 2022
1
0
25
I'm curious to know what became of Openmindedsingh, his decision, and his life in the years after. As someone who finds myself in a relatively similar age/position to his original predicament, much of what he said resonated with me more so than any other posts or articles I've come across, primarily his description of living the worst of all worlds through the act of fence sitting (hence my alias).

I suspect he might be long gone from this forum now, but will keep an eye out for an unlikely reply and how it may inform my own experience of the paralysis that results from perpetual uncertainty in my identity.
 
Oct 7, 2010
20
23
I'm curious to know what became of Openmindedsingh, his decision, and his life in the years after. As someone who finds myself in a relatively similar age/position to his original predicament, much of what he said resonated with me more so than any other posts or articles I've come across, primarily his description of living the worst of all worlds through the act of fence sitting (hence my alias).

I suspect he might be long gone from this forum now, but will keep an eye out for an unlikely reply and how it may inform my own experience of the paralysis that results from perpetual uncertainty in my identity.
Did you become Khalsa by choice or by custom?
Did you offer your head to the Guru sincerely or because you had to?
If given the choice would you do it again?
What kind of marriage do you want and how will your children be raised?
If as you become older and you decide that you want a different life would you leave your family behind?

I am not Khalsa. I do consider myself a sikh and I have raised three children into adulthood. I was a rebellious and disrespectful child and young adult and I brought pain and heartache to my mother. I tell you this about myself as I have no illusions about my own past judgement. I certainly do not qualify as a roll model. I do not ask these questions to yank your chain. I hope they help you to find the right path that works for you and gives you peace. May God and Guru help you on your journey. Meditate on it and really give yourself the chance to see further than today or even next year to make your decision. Whatever you choose to do, you are loved. <3
 

Dalvinder Singh Grewal

Writer
Historian
SPNer
Jan 3, 2010
864
407
76
It is your decision to be a Sikh or not. Hair are inseparable for a Sikh. For the sake of maintaining hair Bhai Taru Singh accepted to get his Scalp of head removed rather than getting the hair cut. Muslim offered great privileges' to Sikhs to become Muslims but they accepted to face tortious deaths. Sikhism is certainly a great religion which has history of sacrifices. They never gave up their religion for major worldly benefits. Your desire to bow for a minor comfort shows that you are not a true Sikh at heart.
 
Oct 7, 2010
20
23
It is your decision to be a Sikh or not. Hair are inseparable for a Sikh. For the sake of maintaining hair Bhai Taru Singh accepted to get his Scalp of head removed rather than getting the hair cut. Muslim offered great privileges' to Sikhs to become Muslims but they accepted to face tortious deaths. Sikhism is certainly a great religion which has history of sacrifices. They never gave up their religion for major worldly benefits. Your desire to bow for a minor comfort shows that you are not a true Sikh at heart.
Respectfully I don't agree with you sir. There comes a point in a persons spiritual journey where they must assess their beliefs independently of their family. When raised in a belief system we accept it as our own as we follow our family's example. As we become independent adults it is normal to to ask ourselves, "Is this my path?" Your statement that their "desire to bow for a minor comfort show that you are not a true Sikh at heart.", seems to me to be rather harsh. This young man has come here and is asking for insight and advice. If he didn't care he'd just cut his hair and be done with it.
 
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