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Paganism Blessed Be

Ishna

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Definition: The phrase “blessed be” is found in many modern magical traditions. Although it appears in some Pagan paths, it’s typically more likely to be used in a NeoWiccan context. It’s a traditional greeting, and to say “Blessed be” to someone indicates that you wish good and positive things upon them.


The phrase’s origins are a bit more murky. It is part of a longer ritual which is included in some Gardnerian Wiccan initiation ceremonies. During that rite, the High Priest or High Priest delivers what it known as the Five Fold Kiss, and recites,


Blessed be thy feet, which have brought thee in these ways,
Blessed be thy knees, that shall kneel at the sacred altar,
Blessed be thy womb, without which we would not be,
Blessed be thy breasts, formed in beauty,
Blessed be thy lips, that shall utter the Sacred Names of the gods.

It’s important to keep in mind that Wicca is a newer religion, and many of its terms and rituals are rooted in Thelema, ceremonial magic, and hermetic mysticism. As such, it’s not surprising that many phrases – including “Blessed be” -- appear in other places long before Gerald Gardner incorporated them into his original Book of Shadows.
In fact, the King James Bible includes the verse, “Blessed be the name of the Lord.”


Like many other phrases in the Pagan lexicon, there is no universal rule that you must use “Blessed Be” as a greeting or in a ritual context. If your tradition requires it, then feel free to incorporate it – otherwise, it’s entirely up to you.


Source: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/glossary/g/Blessed_Be.htm



Merry meet, merry part and merry meet again...
 

namjiwankaur

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Nov 14, 2010
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WJKK WJKF

Ishna ji, thanks for taking the time to find out more about the expression "blessed be".

Would there be a similar way in Sikhi to wish blessings for others?

Actually, I had a few questions about things like this. For instance, is there anything said before or after a meal (the Christians call it "saying grace")?

:)
 

Ishna

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Nam Jiwan ji

Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh (the Khalsa belong to Waheguru, victory belongs to Waheguru) is the official Sikh greeting and farewell (you already know that but others might not). I've read somewhere about women shouldn't say the last half to men but of course I ignored that pit of patriarchal nonsense hehe but someone else here might want to expand on why that was said in the first place.

Then there is Sat Sri Akaal (you can add Ji to the end when you want to be more formal), which means something like True is the Lord but I'm convinced there is more depth here, which is a very common salutation and also the concluding half of the jaikara (warcry?) 'Boley so nihal, Sat Sri Akal!' and for this reason some Sikhs don't like to use it in isolation.

I've seen people write 'Guru rakha' on forums which I think means 'guru's protection' but I'm not sure. My Punjabi language book cites 'Rab rakha' instead (god instead of guru).

There's something else I'll post for you when I get to a pc.
 

Luckysingh

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There are quite a few terms that many punjabis use all the while.
Although, none of these are regarded as official as such, but I suppose they come from influence of elders and locations of uprbringing.

The ones coming to mind are
- Raajhi rehe,- stay or always be raajhi, raajhi is to be at peace, always in control by having upperhand..etc..

then there is -
Jhoundha reheo- stay or always be living gracefully, also it's a way of wishing a long healthy life to someone. -May you be blessed with a long life, ..etc..

I perosnally do find myself saying 'jeonday rahou punjabio' very often to myself!!
It's normally if i'm out and about and I see fellow punjabis, especially cute little kids with a gutha or khes. My natural instinct is to say to myself ''jheonday reheo punjabio'' whch means 'let these punjabis be living forever on' or ''long live the punjabis''

I suppose it's just a feel good factor that I encounter especially when I see other sikhs amongst the populations.

Bless the punjabis, wherever in the world they be.
 

Ishna

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Prayer before meals - no particular prayer, people do their own thing, like ardaas, or a shabad they've chosen for the purpose, or a simple 'Waheguru'. Attached is a document I got from the Sikh Youth Australia website a couple of years ago. Can't find the document on their website anymore to link to, I hope they don't mind me sharing it here. Page 32 has a shabad for food.

Oh!

And 'Gurfateh' is another salutation which is used mostly at SPN - can't say I've seen it in use in other places. It's a shortened form of 'Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh'... at least that's what I thought!
 

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Ishna

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Luckyji

Thanks for that insight into Punjabi language.

What would the Sikh version of 'jeonday rahou punjabio' be?

As much as me and Nam Jiwan enjoy being honorary Punjabis! hehe
 

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