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Would You Still Believe In Sikhi, If You Weren't Born Into A Sikh Family?

Jan 26, 2018
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I'd like to hear some truly honest answers. If you weren't born in a Sikh family, for example a Hindu, Muslim, or Christian, do you think you would have agreed in the teachings of Sikhism, and converted into Sikhism.
 

Harry Haller

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Jan 31, 2011
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most Sikhs are not born into Sikh families, they are born into ritualistic, traditional, superstitious, misogynistic families, they are worse off, as their perception of Sikhism is so jaded by their environment, that they grow older and propagate the same rubbish to their own children, and so on, and so on, a few question, a lot more these days, however, there are always a few of the old men with beards desperate to hang on to their authority that will never question, and wish that everything stays the same,

Sikh Philosophy is pretty universal in my opinion, its a question of truth, and that is pretty much it, the universal truth, not the truth at this time, given the society we live in, one does not have to convert to Sikhism to believe in Sikhism. Its just a way of life, living by the truth, one, in my opinion, could be a Muslim, yet still live by Sikh ideals.
 
Mar 9, 2018
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I probably wouldn't have heard of Sikhism if i wasn't born into a sikh family. But it wasn't until i was 22 that i started caring and everything good i learn't was from my own research. Before that i was shifting between agnostic or athiest.
 

Tejwant Singh

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Jun 30, 2004
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I probably wouldn't have heard of Sikhism if i wasn't born into a sikh family. But it wasn't until i was 22 that i started caring and everything good i learn't was from my own research. Before that i was shifting between agnostic or athiest.
This is the reason Sikhi is a journey of the individual where personal experiences are very personal which cannot be shared with anyone. However, on the other side of the coin, Sikhi urges us to use our bibek budhi - Constructive Intellect. Thus, it ceases to be one more blind faith as dogmatic religions are known.

But more importantly, one is not born a Sikh but rather becomes one. Many of us like myself were Sikhs via osmosis, nothing more.

Having said that, things are changing in the diaspora. More and more Sikhs are participating outside the four walls of the Gurdwara.

I am on the board of Interfaith Council of Southern Nevada. Seder in Judaism is during the Easter time. A reform Judaism Temple, Ner Tamid is having an Interfaith Seder this coming Wednesday on March 21st. I gave them the idea that as Guru Granth is all musical, we can sing there. This gave wings to all the singers of different religions.
I am taking our Raagis there for the purpose.

With this kind of metamorphosis, many of the natives would have a desire to visit Amrtisar.
 
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Jan 26, 2018
46
9
40
most Sikhs are not born into Sikh families, they are born into ritualistic, traditional, superstitious, misogynistic families, they are worse off, as their perception of Sikhism is so jaded by their environment, that they grow older and propagate the same rubbish to their own children, and so on, and so on, a few question, a lot more these days, however, there are always a few of the old men with beards desperate to hang on to their authority that will never question, and wish that everything stays the same,

Sikh Philosophy is pretty universal in my opinion, its a question of truth, and that is pretty much it, the universal truth, not the truth at this time, given the society we live in, one does not have to convert to Sikhism to believe in Sikhism. Its just a way of life, living by the truth, one, in my opinion, could be a Muslim, yet still live by Sikh ideals.
I agree with most of what you said, but see there's still this reality, and think you touched it (most "Sikh families" are traditional, somewhat ritualistic, but over all just try to keep what was handed down to them. And then pass it on to the next gen. without question or intelligent thoughts. Thus repeating the cycle). But still I would say majority of Sikh families are like this. And though, today's version of a Sikh's thinking might be evolved, more curious than ever, I honestly believe that most Sikh families would disagree with you, that you can be a "Muslim" and practice Sikhi. I know for sure that the hardcore Khalsa - Amritari Sikhs would say that without the 5ks and Amirt you are not a Sikh. This was explained on YouTube channel "Basics of Sikh". Keep forgetting the guys name, but in the video he had a group of youngsters in the crowd. And who knows how they will take his explanation, will they question it in life, or just follow it blindly. And so just spreading what was handed down to us from previous generations.

My wife's friend lives in Italy with her husband, both cut their hair. I asked her to ask them, do they consider themselves Sikhs, they said "yes". But I asked then why did you cut your hair. Didn't really have an answer at the time. Later my wife tells me they thought I was stupid/crazy or something like that, for bringing up this question. I really don't talk to her friend anyways so it didn't bother me.

I have cousins and relatives who are clean shaved or keep their hair short (girls), and they still identify themselves as Sikhs. Now granted, their IQ on religious matters is prolly not that high, but they will do the standard procedures: Go to Gurdwara, matha tek (bow - forgive the spelling), sit and listen to kirtan, langar, some Seva, gup shup, and go home. I really doubt most of them or even the Uncles and Aunties of old can even understand what they just listened to.

Guess this is what puzzles me, everyone will have their own version of what it means to be a Sikh. On this site, from what I've seen, some will say that Sikhi is not a religion (I disagree on that - but another topic) but rather its a journey. Some will say I cut my hair but have God and Sikhi in my heart. Others - must follow 5ks/Amrit. Then you have the in-betweeners (right now in my life I prolly fall into this category), the ones you keep kesh, turban, beard, do the "rituals" of Gurdwara, and just keep trolling on. Each person will argue that their version or belief is the correct one. Which makes me question (and this can apply to any other religion), if no one is right, then none of the religions can be valid, because not one can prove that they 100% right.

Found this quite interesting: Comedian Ricky Gervais was on Stephen Colbert show, and said the following, "If you take any kind of fiction (I'm assuming he mean Non- and reg Fiction) and other books such as the bible, and destroyed them, and then in 1000 years (as mankind possibly evolves in their thinking - hopefully) that those religious texts won't be the same - like they wouldnt be read the same, or even apply. But Science books - or anything Science related, if destroyed today, in 1000 years would still be the same (yes, yes, some scientific theories will prove prior theories incorrect) but for the most what Science can prove now, can still be true 1000 years from now. Here's the video, take it as you please.

 
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Harry Haller

SPNer
Jan 31, 2011
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I agree with most of what you said, but see there's still this reality, and think you touched it (most "Sikh families" are traditional, somewhat ritualistic, but over all just try to keep what was handed down to them. And then pass it on to the next gen. without question or intelligent thoughts. Thus repeating the cycle). But still I would say majority of Sikh families are like this.
sure they are, they are more Punjabi families than Sikh families, but what do I know...

And though, today's version of a Sikh's thinking might be evolved, more curious than ever, I honestly believe that most Sikh families would disagree with you, that you can be a "Muslim" and practice Sikhi.
well they would, blinkered thinking in my view, lots of it about.

I know for sure that the hardcore Khalsa - Amritari Sikhs would say that without the 5ks and Amirt you are not a Sikh
I think the 5k's and Amrit are a wonderful idea, provided you have the insides to match it

This was explained on YouTube channel "Basics of Sikh". Keep forgetting the guys name, but in the video he had a group of youngsters in the crowd. And who knows how they will take his explanation, will they question it in life, or just follow it blindly. And so just spreading what was handed down to us from previous generations.
People do not seem to like thinking for themselves, I think, they are afraid they will end up at the place where maybe you and I are at, lots of questions that cannot be answered, it shows disrespect, We are all for taking Amrit, but it is quite a commitment, not just the physical one, although it is the physical one that most do their utmost to uphold, but the mental commitment, to God, to the Guru, to give your head, your brain, that seems to be secondary.

My wife's friend lives in Italy with her husband, both cut their hair. I asked her to ask them, do they consider themselves Sikhs, they said "yes". But I asked then why did you cut your hair. Didn't really have an answer at the time. Later my wife tells me they thought I was stupid/crazy or something like that, for bringing up this question. I really don't talk to her friend anyways so it didn't bother me.
If the question is can one be a Sikh with cut hair, the answer should be yes, after all what is the difference between a moral person with cut hair, and a person sporting all 5 K's with questionable morals, even in thought, regardless of action?

I have cousins and relatives who are clean shaved or keep their hair short (girls), and they still identify themselves as Sikhs. Now granted, their IQ on religious matters is prolly not that high, but they will do the standard procedures: Go to Gurdwara, matha tek (bow - forgive the spelling), sit and listen to kirtan, langar, some Seva, gup shup, and go home. I really doubt most of them or even the Uncles and Aunties of old can even understand what they just listened to.
A lot of them just seek the piece of mind that listening to kirtan brings, the community spirit that langar brings, the satisfaction of seva, and the social aspect, sure its not perfect, but its probably better than going to brothels whilst stoned off your {censored}, its being in the right company, even if it is not understood, there are worse things to do on a sunday. Its all relative...

Guess this is what puzzles me, everyone will have their own version of what it means to be a Sikh.
why does that puzzle you, even yours and my opinion is our own version of what it means to be a Sikh, one must respect others versions, as much as one wishes respect for ones own.
On this site, from what I've seen, some will say that Sikhi is not a religion (I disagree on that - but another topic) but rather its a journey. Some will say I cut my hair but have God and Sikhi in my heart. Others - must follow 5ks/Amrit. Then you have the in-betweeners (right now in my life I prolly fall into this category), the ones you keep kesh, turban, beard, do the "rituals" of Gurdwara, and just keep trolling on. Each person will argue that their version or belief is the correct one. Which makes me question (and this can apply to any other religion), if no one is right, then none of the religions can be valid, because not one can prove that they 100% right.
Until we are dead, no we can't so everyone gives it their best shot, and I have no problem with that at all, however, there are those that force their opinions on others without debate, without answering questions, and just accuse others of lack of faith, such people cannot be argued with and are best left alone, time is too precious to waste.

Im my view Sikhism encourages questions, thinking, using your brain, but each persons conclusions will differ slightly, each person has a personal relationship with God, what is your relationship with God?
 

sukhsingh

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Aug 14, 2012
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I'd like to hear some truly honest answers. If you weren't born in a Sikh family, for example a Hindu, Muslim, or Christian, do you think you would have agreed in the teachings of Sikhism, and converted into Sikhism.
Great question..!

I would profess that even if I wasn't aware of the teachings or expressions of gurus I would still be a sikh .. Because sikhi tells you to seek out the truth. A truth is universal and within and comprehensible to us all through introspection.

For me Sikhism is a religion, sikhi is not. I don't believe that religion is congruent to sikhi. I believe bani is about transcending identity .
 

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