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Take Amrit

Ishna

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May 9, 2006
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Dear Killgore Ji

Participating in an amrit sanchar is a blessing. It is a lifelong commitment to joining Guru Sahib's army. Personally I think it should be a goal of all Sikhs, but it should not be rushed into and it should be done with awareness and love.

It is not essential for a Sikh, but it is a good goal to have. If it is something that interests you I recommend saying a heartfelt ardaas to share your intention with yourself in a meaningful way, and even make a public statement of your intentions. And then live like an initiated Khalsa Sikh until you are blessed with the opportunity of an amrit sanchar.

The khande di pahul in itself is not a magical, mysterious event. By itself, it does not change your life.

You can be a Sikh without it. It does not create a barrier between you and development of your connection to and awareness of the Oneness of the Universe.
 

ActsOfGod

Writer
SPNer
Aug 14, 2012
387
526
Hello everybody :)

I have a simply question to ask

it is necessary to take amrit for a sikh

and what is the rapport of non baptism sikh and god

thanks for your answer
In a Sikh's life, there are only four ceremonies: birth ceremony, marriage ceremony (anand karaj), initiation ceremony (receiving amrit), and death ceremony. Quite simple. Two of these, you have no choice over (birth and death). The other two, you might have some choice or at least influence over.

According to SRM, a Sikh is defined as:

Any human being who faithfully believes in:
+ One Immortal Being
+ Ten Gurus, from Guru Nanak Dev to Guru Gobind Singh
+ The Guru Granth Sahib
+ The utterances and teachings of the ten Gurus
+ The baptism bequeathed by the tenth Guru, and who does not owe allegiance to any other religion, is a Sikh.

If you believe in amrit (even if you have not taken amrit and become amritdhari yet), you are a Sikh as per the definition from SRM.

Also, maybe this article might help:

https://fromthese5tothose5.wordpress.com/2011/12/06/why-amrit-is-it-really-necessary/

AoG
 

Inderjeet Kaur

Writer
SPNer
Oct 13, 2011
871
1,766
Seattle, Washington, USA
Of those two ceremonies, anand karaj and Amrit, in one way, at least, the Amrit is the most binding. Marriage ends at the death of either spouse. Amrit doesn't end.

To me, and this is just my opinion, I cannot imagine the point of being a Sikh if you have not taken Amrit and are not working toward it. If you wait to feel ready or worthy, you'll never accept this blessing, because no one is ever ready and certainly, no one is worthy, IMO.

Here is what I suggest. Do a trial run. For a month or 6 months, or whatever period of time you choose, live as if you had taken Amrit. Do your Nitnem faithfully, keep all 5 kakkars on you always, observe the four taboos, in short, live as if you were a Khalsa. I suggest you enlist the assistance of an Amritdhari Sikh who can show you the ins and outs. After you've done this for a while, you'll have a pretty good idea if you can live according to this way of life. Don't expect it to be easy and, if you, fall down, pick yourself up and keep on going.

Remember this, Amrit is the first step in the journey. These "rules" are the external things that will help you grow toward the Sikh you can become; they are not arbitrary. There is no magic in the initiation itself. The "magic" comes from your commitment and your willingness to learn and move forward.

Guru fateh!
 

ActsOfGod

Writer
SPNer
Aug 14, 2012
387
526
Here's another context to put this in:

Consider the original Panj Pyare. When they stood up, they were not expecting that they would receive Naam, or wear the 5 kakkars, or do their daily Nitnem, etc. etc. They didn't imagine that this was what Amrit would give them. They didn't take Amrit for any of these reasons. So why did they stand up?

They stood up to end their existence.

As far as they knew, this was the end. Give your head to the Guru. End your existence. Your Guru demands it. Who will volunteer? Bhai Daya Singh, Bhai Dharam Singh, Bhai Mohkam Singh, Bhai Himmat Singh, and Bhai Sahib Singh, one by one, all chose to make the ultimate sacrifice and give their lives, their actual lives, to the Guru.

When you get that feeling inside that you want to give your life to the Guru, that is when you consider taking Amrit. If you are considering taking Amrit so that you can receive Naam, or get salvation, or follow the rules, or get to wear the bana, etc. etc. etc. then reconsider your motivations in light of how the original Panj Pyare stood up.

AoG
 

Inderjeet Kaur

Writer
SPNer
Oct 13, 2011
871
1,766
Seattle, Washington, USA
Here's another context to put this in:

When you get that feeling inside that you want to give your life to the Guru, that is when you consider taking Amrit. If you are considering taking Amrit so that you can receive Naam, or get salvation, or follow the rules, or get to wear the bana, etc. etc. etc. then reconsider your motivations in light of how the original Panj Pyare stood up.

AoG
That hits the nail on the head andI should have said that and then added the rest.

One measure of having reached that point is the willingness and ability to live the Khalsa lifestyle and I do suggest that to anyone considering taking Amrit.
 

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