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Punjabi: Russia and Ukraine War Like Situation

dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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Heavy Russian missile and drone strikes on Kyiv and the northeastern city of Kharkiv killed at least five people, dozens wounded and caused widespread damage on Tuesday, Ukrainian officials said. Four civilians were killed and 92 others were injured in the capital of Kyiv, Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said on his Telegram channel, as Kinzhal missiles that can fly at 10 times the speed of sound bore down on the city. Strikes in Kharkiv killed one person and wounded more than 40 others, as well as damaging multi-storey buildings, said the head of the city’s military administration, Oleh Syniehubov.
The attacks struck residential buildings and civilian infrastructure, hours after Russia’s President Vladimir Putin said an air strike on the Russian city of Belgorod, which killed 24 civilians and which he blamed on Ukraine, “will not go unpunished” and promised to intensify attacks. Russia has stepped up air strikes on Ukraine over the New Year period, and on Friday conducted its largest air attack of the almost two-year-old war on Ukraine, killing at least 39 people. Russia attacked with waves of different missiles during the morning rush hour on Tuesday. Military authorities issued air alerts that lasted for at least three hours.
Kyiv’s Mayor Vitali Klitschko said gas pipelines had been damaged in Kyiv’s Pecherskyi district, and electricity and water had been cut off in several districts of the capital. Rescuers were putting out fires in several places, he said. The loss of electricity and water brought back memories of last winter, when Russia pounded the energy grid with missiles, causing frequent power cuts and plunging millions into darkness. Syniehubov said the central part of the city of Kharkiv was attacked at about 07:30am (05:30 GMT). After the initial aerial barrage, Yuri Ihnat, spokesperson for the Ukrainian air force, said the situation remained tense and that air defences were bracing for more Russian missile launches.
Russia has escalated air strikes on Ukraine over the New Year period. [Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters]
Kyiv mayor Klitschko reported multiple explosions and debris from downed missiles hitting the capital as residents were advised to stay in underground shelters. [Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters]
1704246992776.png

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Views of sites of residential complexes damaged during Russian Missile and drone attacks
Kyiv authorities said missiles caused fires in a supermarket building, houses and a market. [Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters]
The attacks on the capital Kyiv and the northeastern city of Kharkiv came less than 24 hours after Russian President Vladimir Putin said Moscow would intensify strikes. [Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters]
National energy company Ukrenergo said 250,000 consumers were without electricity in Kyiv and surrounding areas after the strikes. Temperatures in the region were hovering around 3C (37.4F). [Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters]
Power outages have become a regular feature of life in war-hit areas of Ukraine, with Russia targeting critical energy infrastructure, according to Ukraine’s national energy company Ukrenergo. [Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters]

Ukraine and its partners in the West worry that Russia could try to replicate a strategy it followed last winter, squeezing Ukraine by targeting energy infrastructure as temperatures fall. [Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters]
Last winter, Russia repeatedly attacked civilian infrastructure far from the front lines, leaving millions of Ukrainians without power, heat or water for days at a time. [Valentyn Ogirenko/ Reuters]
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
563
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79
Russia and Ukraine exchanged hundreds of prisoners of war in the biggest single release of captives since Russia began its full-scale invasion in February 2022. Ukrainian officials said that 230 of its prisoners were released while Russia said 248 of its soldiers were returned following mediation by the United Arab Emirates.
Russia said Ukraine launched attacks on its Belgorod and Kursk regions, as well as the Crimean Peninsula that Moscow invaded and annexed from Ukraine in 2014. Belgorod regional Governor Vyacheslav Gladkov said the situation remained “tense” after 12 missiles were shot down over the region. Some 25 people were killed in an air attack on Belgorod on Saturday. There were no reports of casualties from Wednesday’s attacks.
Two people were killed and one injured after 134 Russian strikes hit the Zaporizhia region over the 24 hours to Wednesday, according to Yuriy Malashko, the head of Ukraine’s regional military administration. One person was killed in heavy Russian shelling of Ukraine’s southern Kherson region including its main city. One person was killed and one injured after Russia launched four missiles on the eastern town of Avdiivka, Donetsk regional head Vadym Filashkin said in a Telegram message. The town, not far from Donetsk, which is occupied by the Russians has been the scene of intense fighting for weeks.
The United Kingdom’s Ministry of Defence said Russia’s military might have changed its strike strategy in Ukraine to target the country’s defence industry rather than energy infrastructure as it did last winter. “Russian planners almost certainly recognise the growing importance of relative defence industrial capacity as they prepare for a long war,” the ministry said in its latest intelligence update.
Aleksandr Syrskyi, the commander of the Ukrainian army’s ground forces, said Russian forces were continuing their offensives in Bakhmut and Kupyan on the eastern front with fighting in Bakhmut particularly intense. Syrskyi said Russian forces had suffered losses in Lyman and were regrouping in preparation for a new offensive.
Russia said four people were injured after its aircraft accidentally bombed the village of Petropavlovka in southwest Russia on Tuesday. There was also damage to houses, a school and some administrative buildings as well as to vehicles.
The European Union imposed sanctions on Alrosa, the world’s biggest diamond miner, to further squeeze Russian sources of revenue. The company’s CEO, Pavel Alekseevich Marinychev, was also sanctioned. Alrosa accounts for more than 90 percent of all Russian diamond production, according to the EU. Ukraine’s Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal said the country will need more than $37bn in foreign funding this year, and that Kyiv was counting on “stable and timely assistance” from its international partners to help keep its economy going. Rafael Grossi, director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, said inspectors had been denied access to parts of Ukraine’s Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia nuclear power station for two weeks and had yet to receive 2024 maintenance plans for the facility.

Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski said Western countries should tighten sanctions against Russia and provide Kyiv with long-range missiles that will enable it to target “launch sites and command centres”.
Norway will send two F-16 fighter jets to Denmark so Ukrainian pilots can train to use the US-made aircraft. Ten Norwegian instructors have already been sent to Denmark to help train the pilots.
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
563
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An internal audit of Ukraine’s Defence Ministry has found more than $262m worth of violations in four months. Three people are reported injured in Belgorod as Russia’s air defences down 10 RM-70 Vampir rockets over the region, according to Russian officials and the Ministry of Defence. A woman died after two houses were shelled in the village of Gornal in Russia’s Kursk region, according to its governor, Roman Starovoyt. The Kremlin says the Russian military will do everything in its power to tackle an increase in Ukrainian shelling of Belgorod. A wave of Russian air raids kill four people across Ukraine, officials say.
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
563
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Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Moscow would do everything it could to halt Ukrainian attacks on Belgorod as Russia’s Defence Ministry said it had brought down 10 rockets fired at the Russian border city in an attack that injured three. Hundreds of people have been evacuated from Belgorod since an attack last month that killed more than 20 civilians.
One person was killed in Ukrainian shelling of Russia’s Kursk region near the border, while three people were injured after drones struck a fuel facility in the neighbouring region of Oryol, according to the governors of the two regions. One person was killed in Ukrainian shelling of Horlivka in Ukraine’s Russian-occupied Donetsk region, according to the town’s Russian-installed mayor.
At least 520 children have been killed and nearly 1,200 injured since Russia launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine last year, according to the office of Ukraine’s Prosecutor General. A body was found in the ruins of a Kyiv warehouse destroyed in Russia’s December 29 missile attack on the Ukrainian capital, bringing the number of deaths in the bombardment to 33.
Russian Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu assured security officials that his forces were in control along the roughly 1,500km (930-mile) front line, which has been largely static over the past year despite fierce fighting. “We retain the strategic initiative along the entire line of contact,” Shoigu said, accusing the United States of pressuring Ukraine to keep fighting against Russia. He claimed that Ukraine lost 215,000 soldiers in the fighting last year.

A secret meeting took place last month in Saudi Arabia between Ukraine, its Group of Seven (G7) allies and a small group of Global South countries to build support for Kyiv Peace Plan, according to Bloomberg News. The report, citing people familiar with the situation, said China chose not to attend and Russia was not invited.
Russia’s Interior Ministry put exiled Russian tycoon and opposition leader Mikhail Khodorkovsky on its wanted list, accusing him of spreading false information about the Russian army, according to Russian state news agency TASS. London-based Khodorkovsky has been a vocal critic of the war in Ukraine
The Italian city of Modena blocked the use of a public hall to host a private event on the reconstruction of the Ukrainian city of Mariupol, which is under Russian occupation, saying it appeared to openly support Russia’s invasion. The event was organised by the Russia Emilia-Romagna cultural association and panelists included the Russian consul general in Milan, Dmitry Shtodin, according to the organisers’ website.
A group of 48 countries, including Argentina, Australia and the US condemned “in the strongest possible terms the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s (DPRK) export and Russia’s procurement of DPRK ballistic missiles, as well as Russia’s use of these missiles against Ukraine on December 30, 2023, and January 2, 2024”. Such transfers breached United Nations Security Council resolutions on North Korea, they added in a joint statement. The Kremlin’s Peskov declined to comment on the US and Ukrainian allegations.
Ukraine’s Air Force spokesman Yurii Ihnat told national television that Russia’s recent escalation of missile and drone attacks was stretching Ukraine’s air defence resources, leaving the country vulnerable unless it could secure further weapons supplies. Russia fired more than 500 drones and missiles between December 29 and January 2, according to officials in Kyiv.
Ukrainian Defence Minister Rustem Umerov said an internal audit of the ministry had so far uncovered corruption schemes estimated at more than $262m, including over the purchase of ammunition.
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said there were “clear signs of a slowdown” in the activities of Russia’s defence industry and called for further action to eliminate loopholes in sanctions against Moscow. Zelenskyy did not provide evidence for his claim.
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
563
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Two Russian S-300 missiles struck a hotel in the centre of northeastern Kharkiv injuring 11 people, including journalists, according to Mayor Ihor Terekhov. Several other buildings, including two apartment blocks, were also damaged.
At least one person was killed in a Russian-guided bomb attack on the village of Olkhovatka in the Kupiansk district of the Kharkiv region, according to Oleg Sinegubov, the head of the regional military administration. At least 10 private homes, a shop and a school were damaged, he added.
Authorities in Belgorod evacuated some 392 children from the Russian border city after weeks of shelling from Ukrainian forces. Some 300 residents have already left the city, one of the biggest civilian evacuations on Russian soil since Moscow began its full-scale invasion of Ukraine in February 2022.
Russia and Ukraine reported intense battles along the front line in the south and east around Avdiivka, Mariinsky, Kupiansk and Kherson. Russia claimed Ukraine had lost at least 450 soldiers in the confrontations, while Ukraine claimed it had killed 800 Russian troops.
Ukraine announced a new online service which will allow Russians whose relatives are soldiers missing in Ukraine to find out whether they have been confirmed killed or are being held as POWs.
Speaking in Lithuania, at the start of an unannounced visit to the three Baltic states, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy warned that Western hesitation on aid was emboldening Russia and that Ukraine needed to strengthen its air defences and replenish its supplies of ammunition. “He [Russian President Vladimir Putin] won’t finish this [war] until we all finish him together,” Zelenskyy said after talks with his Lithuanian counterpart Gitanas Nauseda. “Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Moldova may be next.”
United Nations agencies will next week ask for $3.1bn to finance humanitarian assistance for Ukraine in 2024. Edem Wosornu, director of the Operations and Advocacy Division for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), told the UN Security Council that the war had driven “high levels of humanitarian need” and that financial support had to be sustained.
Pope Francis expressed concern that international attention was shifting away from Ukraine. In a letter to the head of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, Francis said he was sorry that “in an increasingly tragic international situation, the war in Ukraine risks becoming a forgotten one”.
NATO allies said they would continue to provide Ukraine with major military, economic and humanitarian aid and outlined plans to provide “billions of euros of further capabilities” in 2024 to Ukraine. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said the alliance strongly condemned Russia’s attacks and would boost Ukraine’s air defences.
USA appears to be backtracking from promises since its war on two fronts is becoming incontrollable and internal pressures on Biden are affecting open support to both Israel and Ukraine.
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
563
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79
Have the US and Europe Union sanctions on Russia failed?

In the early weeks of the Ukraine war, the US imposed devastating sanctions aimed at crippling the Kremlin's war efforts and cutting off access to the technology it needed to make sophisticated weapons. But 17 months later, Russia is exploiting loopholes in the West's sanctions regime to import US technology through neighboring states, online retailers, and a network of fake companies. Officials, experts, and media reports have laid out the routes Russia is using to import the banned or restricted technology. It has allowed the Kremlin to maintain a steady supply of missiles to devastate Ukraine's cities and infrastructure. Ukrainian officials last Tuesday said that Russian K-100 cruise missiles used in recent attacks were built in 2023, using more than 30 foreign components, meaning that Western sanctions weren't working.
"Restrictions have already been imposed, but sanctions need to be strengthened so that Russia cannot obtain critical components and manufacture missiles," said Head of the Presidents's Office Andry Yermak on Telegram
The US sanctions include a ban on .the sale of technology that could be used by Russia to build weapons.
Russia's armaments industry has long depended on US microchip technology for weapons components such as the navigation systems for long-range missiles, as well as drones and planes. Many countries assist Russia to acquire these.

For example The Kazakhstan back door for tech supplies is visible. Cars can be seen queueing on the Russian side of the border with Kazakhstan near the Kazakh Syrym crossing point on September 27, 2022. Gary Sommerville, an open-source intelligence investigator with the UK's Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), authored a recent report that found 450 foreign-made components were being used in Russia's most sophisticated weapons. He said Russia had adapted to the sanctions and built a successful covert procurement system centered in its neighbors and other nearby states, including Kazakhstan.
"Despite the initial sanctions and export control measures that were put in place just after the invasion of Ukraine, they have adapted and they're relying on these on these third countries," he told Insider. "It's a problem we've never faced before, at least not on this scale," he said.
Kazakhstan's Minister of National Economy Alibek Kuantyrov in a statement to Insider said that though the country has not joined in Western sanctions against Russia, it was committed to slowing the flow of sanctioned goods.
Russia's chip imports declined sharply after the outbreak of the war, but climbed again as it diversified its supplies. According to figures from the opposition group the free Russia Foundation , semiconductor imports to Russia increased from $1.8 billion in 2021 to $2.5 billion in 2022.
To obtain the parts, the Russian defense ministry set up a network of fake companies often registered in countries such as Kazakhstan and Armenia, said Sommerville, the RUSI expert. The companies then obtain US tech in bulk through third-party retailers, and transport it back to Russia. Colonel Mykola Danilyuk, a Ukrainian officer, told the economist in July that Russia was using online stores to import US chip systems used to control missiles. Many of the parts are classified as "dual use" — where an item has civilian as well as military applications — and so aren't covered by the sanctions. "You can simply order them on Aliexpress and export them in a couple of suitcases from Kazakhstan," Danilyuk told the publication. A spokesman for Aliexpress declined to comment on the record. A search by Insider found the technology available on other online sale platforms such as Amazon and eBay. An eBay spokesman told Insider that the company abides by the laws of the countries it operates in, and observes relevant international sanctions.
"All transactions involving Russian addresses have been suspended since March of 2022. We continuously monitor new transaction trends and update our controls as appropriate," said the spokesman. According to the Economist report, logic boards from California-made Altera Flex have been used in building the KH-100 cruise missiles Russia has used in attacks on Ukrainian cities and infrastructure.
The report didn't suggest Altera Flex was breaking any rules. The company didn't reply to a request for comment. Sommerville said that complex global trade systems meant it is difficult for compliance officers at corporations to know where a product may end up. He said it was unlikely more sanctions alone would cut off Russia's supply of American technology. Instead, he suggested increased coordination between governments and private companies to raise awareness of Russian supply routes. "Anything that can be done to even slow down Russia's ability to rebuild stockpiles would have a net benefit for the Ukrainian forces on the ground," he said. Yes. They have as per various observers. The most widely discussed reasons for the failure of Russia sanctions focus on issues in their enforcement: Their bypassing by southern states in complex supply chains, the loopholes of dual-use goods exports, and companies' reluctance to completely halt business with the Russian market.

Last December, the European Union banned imports of Russian crude oil in a bid to starve the Russian war machine into submission over its invasion of Ukraine. However Russian oil was bought at a cheaper rate by non aligned countries like India, keeping Russian oil funding the war.

Russia also doubled down on fast, cheap, unguided bombs to attack Ukraine. Russia produces more ballistic missiles, glide bombs and drones as Ukraine targets Russian military installations from afar.
Russia appears to be doubling down on glide bombs and ballistic missiles – unsophisticated, inexpensive bombs difficult to intercept – as well as drones, as its strategy for inflicting a new wave of destruction on Ukraine’s cities and infrastructure.

Since December 29, Russia has launched almost daily barrages of drones and missiles of various types at Ukraine to probe for weaknesses in its aerial defences.
Russia has been launching barrages of hypersonic and cruise missiles against Ukrainian targets on Monday, striking near the front lines of fighting in the east as well as in central and western parts of the country, officials said. At least four civilians were reported killed and 30 injured. Unlike last winter, when the Kremlin’s forces targeted Ukraine’s power grid, Russia is now reportedly aiming at Kyiv's defence industry . But the almost daily barrages have repeatedly hit civilian areas. Monday’s attacks struck a string of neighbour-hoods, including housing and a shopping mall, across Ukraine. Russia fired 51 missiles of various types, as well as eight Shahed drones, at Ukraine, Ukrainian commander-in-chief Valerii Zaluzhnyi said. The Ukrainian Air Force intercepted 18 of the cruise missiles and all the drones, he said.
Russia’s Ministry of Defence said its forces used precision sea-launched and air-launched long-range missiles, including Kinzhal hypersonic missiles, to strike what it called “facilities of Ukraine’s military-industrial complete”.
Ukraine has been downing almost all of the drones and an impressive ratio of missiles. That changed on Monday, when Ukraine intercepted only 18 of a {censored}tail of 51 missiles Russia fired at the regions of Kharkiv, Dnipropetrovsk, Zaporizhia and Khmelnytskyi. Those that got through killed at least four civilians.
Part of Russia’s success appeared to be the use of six Iskander and eight Kinzhal ballistic missiles. These travel at terminal speeds of 9,000-12,000km/h (5,600 to 7,500mph) and are very difficult to intercept.
Unlike cruise missiles, they can also be rendered immune to electronic warfare that interferes with GPS guidance because they carry inertial guidance systems that navigate by dead reckoning.
Another reason for Russia’s success appeared to be that it had mapped weaknesses in Ukraine’s air defence over days of attacks. Ukrainian Air Force spokesman Yuri Ignat told reporters these two reasons explained the low kill rate on Monday.

Russia has been regularly using US equipment acquired through clandestine means.In 2022, Russia imported $2.5 billion worth of semiconductor technologies, up from $1.8 billion in 2021. Semiconductors and microchips play a crucial role in modern-day warfare, powering a range of equipment including drones, radios, missiles and armored vehicles.

Is US industry not happy that its production has become a large earning source both from Russia and Ukraine? Have these sanctions proved to be a boon for them?
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
563
36
79
Have the US and Europe Union sanctions on Russia failed?

In the early weeks of the Ukraine war, the US imposed devastating sanctions aimed at crippling the Kremlin's war efforts and cutting off access to the technology it needed to make sophisticated weapons. But 17 months later, Russia is exploiting loopholes in the West's sanctions regime to import US technology through neighboring states, online retailers, and a network of fake companies. Officials, experts, and media reports have laid out the routes Russia is using to import the banned or restricted technology. It has allowed the Kremlin to maintain a steady supply of missiles to devastate Ukraine's cities and infrastructure. Ukrainian officials last Tuesday said that Russian K-100 cruise missiles used in recent attacks were built in 2023, using more than 30 foreign components, meaning that Western sanctions weren't working.
"Restrictions have already been imposed, but sanctions need to be strengthened so that Russia cannot obtain critical components and manufacture missiles," said Head of the Presidents's Office Andry Yermak on Telegram
The US sanctions include a ban on .the sale of technology that could be used by Russia to build weapons.
Russia's armaments industry has long depended on US microchip technology for weapons components such as the navigation systems for long-range missiles, as well as drones and planes. Many countries assist Russia to acquire these.

For example The Kazakhstan back door for tech supplies is visible. Cars can be seen queueing on the Russian side of the border with Kazakhstan near the Kazakh Syrym crossing point on September 27, 2022. Gary Sommerville, an open-source intelligence investigator with the UK's Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), authored a recent report that found 450 foreign-made components were being used in Russia's most sophisticated weapons. He said Russia had adapted to the sanctions and built a successful covert procurement system centered in its neighbors and other nearby states, including Kazakhstan.
"Despite the initial sanctions and export control measures that were put in place just after the invasion of Ukraine, they have adapted and they're relying on these on these third countries," he told Insider. "It's a problem we've never faced before, at least not on this scale," he said.
Kazakhstan's Minister of National Economy Alibek Kuantyrov in a statement to Insider said that though the country has not joined in Western sanctions against Russia, it was committed to slowing the flow of sanctioned goods.
Russia's chip imports declined sharply after the outbreak of the war, but climbed again as it diversified its supplies. According to figures from the opposition group the free Russia Foundation , semiconductor imports to Russia increased from $1.8 billion in 2021 to $2.5 billion in 2022.
To obtain the parts, the Russian defense ministry set up a network of fake companies often registered in countries such as Kazakhstan and Armenia, said Sommerville, the RUSI expert. The companies then obtain US tech in bulk through third-party retailers, and transport it back to Russia. Colonel Mykola Danilyuk, a Ukrainian officer, told the economist in July that Russia was using online stores to import US chip systems used to control missiles. Many of the parts are classified as "dual use" — where an item has civilian as well as military applications — and so aren't covered by the sanctions. "You can simply order them on Aliexpress and export them in a couple of suitcases from Kazakhstan," Danilyuk told the publication. A spokesman for Aliexpress declined to comment on the record. A search by Insider found the technology available on other online sale platforms such as Amazon and eBay. An eBay spokesman told Insider that the company abides by the laws of the countries it operates in, and observes relevant international sanctions.
"All transactions involving Russian addresses have been suspended since March of 2022. We continuously monitor new transaction trends and update our controls as appropriate," said the spokesman. According to the Economist report, logic boards from California-made Altera Flex have been used in building the KH-100 cruise missiles Russia has used in attacks on Ukrainian cities and infrastructure.
The report didn't suggest Altera Flex was breaking any rules. The company didn't reply to a request for comment. Sommerville said that complex global trade systems meant it is difficult for compliance officers at corporations to know where a product may end up. He said it was unlikely more sanctions alone would cut off Russia's supply of American technology. Instead, he suggested increased coordination between governments and private companies to raise awareness of Russian supply routes. "Anything that can be done to even slow down Russia's ability to rebuild stockpiles would have a net benefit for the Ukrainian forces on the ground," he said. Yes. They have as per various observers. The most widely discussed reasons for the failure of Russia sanctions focus on issues in their enforcement: Their bypassing by southern states in complex supply chains, the loopholes of dual-use goods exports, and companies' reluctance to completely halt business with the Russian market.

Last December, the European Union banned imports of Russian crude oil in a bid to starve the Russian war machine into submission over its invasion of Ukraine. However Russian oil was bought at a cheaper rate by non aligned countries like India, keeping Russian oil funding the war.

Russia also doubled down on fast, cheap, unguided bombs to attack Ukraine. Russia produces more ballistic missiles, glide bombs and drones as Ukraine targets Russian military installations from afar.
Russia appears to be doubling down on glide bombs and ballistic missiles – unsophisticated, inexpensive bombs difficult to intercept – as well as drones, as its strategy for inflicting a new wave of destruction on Ukraine’s cities and infrastructure.

Since December 29, Russia has launched almost daily barrages of drones and missiles of various types at Ukraine to probe for weaknesses in its aerial defences.
Russia has been launching barrages of hypersonic and cruise missiles against Ukrainian targets on Monday, striking near the front lines of fighting in the east as well as in central and western parts of the country, officials said. At least four civilians were reported killed and 30 injured. Unlike last winter, when the Kremlin’s forces targeted Ukraine’s power grid, Russia is now reportedly aiming at Kyiv's defence industry . But the almost daily barrages have repeatedly hit civilian areas. Monday’s attacks struck a string of neighbour-hoods, including housing and a shopping mall, across Ukraine. Russia fired 51 missiles of various types, as well as eight Shahed drones, at Ukraine, Ukrainian commander-in-chief Valerii Zaluzhnyi said. The Ukrainian Air Force intercepted 18 of the cruise missiles and all the drones, he said.
Russia’s Ministry of Defence said its forces used precision sea-launched and air-launched long-range missiles, including Kinzhal hypersonic missiles, to strike what it called “facilities of Ukraine’s military-industrial complete”.
Ukraine has been downing almost all of the drones and an impressive ratio of missiles. That changed on Monday, when Ukraine intercepted only 18 of a {censored}tail of 51 missiles Russia fired at the regions of Kharkiv, Dnipropetrovsk, Zaporizhia and Khmelnytskyi. Those that got through killed at least four civilians.
Part of Russia’s success appeared to be the use of six Iskander and eight Kinzhal ballistic missiles. These travel at terminal speeds of 9,000-12,000km/h (5,600 to 7,500mph) and are very difficult to intercept.
Unlike cruise missiles, they can also be rendered immune to electronic warfare that interferes with GPS guidance because they carry inertial guidance systems that navigate by dead reckoning.
Another reason for Russia’s success appeared to be that it had mapped weaknesses in Ukraine’s air defence over days of attacks. Ukrainian Air Force spokesman Yuri Ignat told reporters these two reasons explained the low kill rate on Monday.

Russia has been regularly using US equipment acquired through clandestine means.In 2022, Russia imported $2.5 billion worth of semiconductor technologies, up from $1.8 billion in 2021. Semiconductors and microchips play a crucial role in modern-day warfare, powering a range of equipment including drones, radios, missiles and armored vehicles.

Is US industry not happy that its production has become a large earning source both from Russia and Ukraine? Have these sanctions proved to be a boon for them?
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
563
36
79
At least 25 killed in shelling at a market in Donetsk; fire at Russian liquefied natural gas producer – as it happened

A fire broke out at a natural gas terminal in the Russian Baltic Sea port of Ust-Luga, the regional governor said early on Sunday. A high alert regime has been introduced in the Kingiseppsky district, which includes the port, and no casualties have been reported, according to the AFP news agency.

Russia’s parliament will consider a law allowing for the confiscation of money, valuables, and other property from those deemed to spread “deliberately false information” about Moscow’s military actions, a senior lawmaker said on Saturday.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said on Saturday that he expected a number of new Western defence packages for Ukraine to be signed this and next month. “We are preparing new agreements with partners – strong bilateral agreements,” Zelenskyy said in his nightly video address.

The Ministry of Defence in the United Kingdom stated on Saturday that Ukraine sustains a military presence along the left bank of the Dnipro River and persists in fending off Russian assaults despite logistical challenges.

Russia has lost 375,270 soldiers in Ukraine since the beginning of the war, including 750 over the past day, the General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine claimed on Saturday. The number has not been independently verified.

Zelenskyy said in an interview aired on Friday that he was worried at the prospect of Donald Trump returning to the White House, branding the former US president’s claim that he could stop Ukraine’s war with Russia in 24 hours as “very dangerous”.

Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico told public broadcaster RTVS on Saturday that neighbouring Ukraine was not a sovereign nation but was under the absolute control of the United States.

North Korea said on Sunday it has agreed to further strategic and tactical cooperation with Russia to establish a “new multi-polarised international order” as the two countries work to build a united front in the face of their separate, intensifying tensions with the US.

Putin may visit Pyongyang soon, North Korea’s state media KCNA reported on Sunday.

The scale of NATO’s Steadfast Defender 2024 exercises mark an “irrevocable return” of the alliance to Cold War schemes, Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Grushko told the state news agency RIA in remarks published on Sunday.
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
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At least 18 people were killed and more than 130 injured after Russia targeted Ukraine’s major cities in a wave of missile strikes, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said. Russia launched nearly 40 missiles of different types in “another combined strike to try to circumvent our air defence system”, he said in a sombre evening address warning the death toll could rise. Eight people were killed in Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-biggest city, which was hit by three waves of attacks. Dozens of Kyiv residents were also injured after Russian missiles hit apartment blocks in the capital.Celeste Wallander, an assistant secretary of defence at the United States Pentagon, said the Russian missile and drone attacks were part of an attempt by Moscow to find weaknesses in Ukraine’s military while additional US funding for security assistance is tied up in Congress.

Russia’s Defence Ministry claimed its air assault on Ukraine targeted companies producing weapons, missiles and ammunition and had been successful. Asked by reporters about the raids and civilian casualties, Kremlin Spokesman Dmitry Peskov said the Russian military “does not hit social facilities and residential neighbourhoods and does not hit civilians”.

Russia rejected allegations that it had forcibly deported Ukrainian children to Russia. Ukraine has said that 20,000 children have been forced to move to Russia since the war erupted in February 2022. The International Criminal Court last year issued arrest warrants for Russian President Vladimir Putin and his children’s commissioner over the transfers.

The US Central Intelligence Agency released a Russian-language video to try and persuade Russian intelligence employees to switch sides and work as double agents for Washington, amid perceived disaffection over the war in Ukraine.

The documentary 20 Days in Mariupol was nominated for an Oscar. The film recounts the Russian siege and brutal capture of the Ukrainian port city in 2022.

NATO signed a 1.1 billion euro ($1.2bn) deal to buy 220,000 rounds of 155mm artillery shells for Ukraine. The shells are not expected to arrive in the country for two to three years.

Coordinated raids in five European countries led to the arrest of three people in the Netherlands suspected of breaking sanctions to export technological and lab equipment to Russia that could have military uses, EU judicial agency Eurojust said.

US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin opened a monthly meeting of about 50 nations that coordinate support for Ukraine against Russia, but did not announce any new US aid for Kyiv. Funding has been blocked by Republicans who want more action on US border issues. Austin joined the meeting from home where he is recover
 

dalvinder45

SPNer
Jul 22, 2023
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A Russian military transport plane with 74 people on board, including 65 Ukrainian Prisoners of War, crashed in Belgorod region of Russia on Wednesday, the country's defence ministry said as reported by news agency TASS.

The crash took place at about 8 am GMT and the Russian news agency cited the governor of the region, stating on his Telegram channel that the incident occurred in the Korocha district, situated near the country's border with Ukraine and all aboard the military plane Ilyushin-76 were killed.

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32 killed as Russian cargo plane crashes in Syria

"On January 24 this year an Ilyushin-76 transport plane crashed in the Belgorod Region during a scheduled flight at about 11 a.m. Moscow time (8 a.m. GMT). There were 65 Ukrainian prisoners of war who were being moved to the Belgorod Region for an exchange, and three escorts on board," Russia's defence ministry said as cited by TASS.

Officials said that Moscow has dispatched a panel of inquiry to probe into the incident.
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Meanwhile, CNN reported that Ukraine is investigating Russia's claims that the crashed plane was carrying Ukrainian servicemen ahead of a prisoner exchange.

However, the official Ukrainian information service, citing sources in Kiev military claimed that the Soviet-era military plane was carrying missiles for the Russian S-300 air defence system, CNN said that it has not verified either side's claim.

Washington Post quoted senior Russian officials who without, providing evidence said it was shot down by Ukrainian forces using either German or US-made missiles."

According to media outlet RT, Russian MP Andrey Kartapolov said that there were two planes carrying Ukrainian PoWs, and that Moscow had to urgently divert the second IL-76, carrying 80 captured troops, out of the danger zone.

The legislator said that despite Kiev being aware about the flight route, the plane was shot down by three anti-aircraft missiles fired from either US-made Patriot or German-made IRIS-T systems.
 

dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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A Russian military transport plane with 74 people on board, including 65 Ukrainian Prisoners of War, crashed in Belgorod region of Russia on Wednesday, the country's defence ministry said as reported by news agency TASS.

The crash took place at about 8 am GMT and the Russian news agency cited the governor of the region, stating on his Telegram channel that the incident occurred in the Korocha district, situated near the country's border with Ukraine and all aboard the military plane Ilyushin-76 were killed.

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Russian plane with 224 on board crashes in Egypt, ISIS claims responsibility

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32 killed as Russian cargo plane crashes in Syria

"On January 24 this year an Ilyushin-76 transport plane crashed in the Belgorod Region during a scheduled flight at about 11 a.m. Moscow time (8 a.m. GMT). There were 65 Ukrainian prisoners of war who were being moved to the Belgorod Region for an exchange, and three escorts on board," Russia's defence ministry said as cited by TASS.

Officials said that Moscow has dispatched a panel of inquiry to probe into the incident.


Meanwhile, CNN reported that Ukraine is investigating Russia's claims that the crashed plane was carrying Ukrainian servicemen ahead of a prisoner exchange.

However, the official Ukrainian information service, citing sources in Kiev military claimed that the Soviet-era military plane was carrying missiles for the Russian S-300 air defence system, CNN said that it has not verified either side's claim.

Washington Post quoted senior Russian officials who without, providing evidence said it was shot down by Ukrainian forces using either German or US-made missiles."

According to media outlet RT, Russian MP Andrey Kartapolov said that there were two planes carrying Ukrainian PoWs, and that Moscow had to urgently divert the second IL-76, carrying 80 captured troops, out of the danger zone.

The legislator said that despite Kiev being aware about the flight route, the plane was shot down by three anti-aircraft missiles fired from either US-made Patriot or German-made IRIS-T systems.
 

dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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Russian-Ukraine war is now concentrated in Kharkiv. Missiles and Drones are raining death on the city. Russian missile sliced off an entire section of a five-storey apartment building, killing 10 people and wounding 60. After putting out the fire in last week’s predawn attack, rescue workers found the victims buried in the rubble that used to be the walls, ceilings and furniture of their apartments. Ukrainians mourn, rebuild, and rebrand a street named after Pushkin as Russian forces intensify their bombing campaign. Ukraine Drones also attack deep in Russia as Medvedev threatens Ukraine’s ‘existence’

“The strike hit Building 7 on Proskury Street in northern Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest city that sits only 40km (25 miles) from the Russian border. Ukrainian officials said Kharkiv was targeted by 15 Russian missiles of three types in one of the largest attacks on the city since the war began 23 months ago. There were remodelled S-300 missiles, parts of air defence systems that intercept and destroy other missiles midair, and X-22 hypersonic missiles designed to destroy warships. The largest and most lethal weapons were Iskanders, 7-metre-long monsters that cost $3m, weigh almost 4 tonnes and carry up to 480kg (1,058 pounds) of explosives – or a nuclear warhead.
 

dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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EU leaders on Thursday agreed a 50 billion euro ($54 billion) aid package for Ukraine, European Council President Charles Michel overcoming weeks of opposition from Hungary.
Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban said that the deal included a “control mechanism,” which guaranteed that funds from Budapest would not end up in Ukraine.
Ukraine’s army chief Valeriy Zaluzhnyi is expected to be dismissed from his post “within days as pe CNN reports. Amid a rift between the leaders President and Army Chief , the later was asked to step down. He reportedly refused, and a source told CNN that a presidential decree could be issued by the end of the week to dismiss the military commander.
KYIV, UKRAINE - AUGUST 24: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky shakes the hand of Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Ukraine Valerii Zaluzhny during the official celebration of Ukrainian Independence Day on August 24, 2023 in Kyiv, Ukraine. The visits from European leaders were meant as a show of solidarity with Ukraine 18 months after Russia's large-scale invasion of the country. Ukraine's Independence Day commemorates its break with the Soviet Union in 1991. (Photo by Alexey Furman/Getty Images)

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky shakes the hand of Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Ukraine Valerii Zaluzhny during the official celebration of Ukrainian Independence Day in August, 2023 in Kyiv, Ukraine.

The move came after months of tension between the officials, particularly after Zaluzhnyi, commander-in-chief of Ukraine’s Armed Forces since July 2021, gave an interview last November in which he described the war with Russia as being at a “stalemate,” a characterization Zelenskyy denied.
In other news, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Wednesday that Ukraine used a U.S.-supplied Patriot air defense system to down a military transport plane in the Belgorod region last week. The plane was carrying 65 Ukrainian prisoners of war and nine Russians. Putin called for an international investigation into the incident.
Ukraine has neither confirmed nor denied that it downed the plane, and has demanded proof of who was on board. Kyiv has also called for an international investigation into the crash.
 

dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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Russian ship sunk by Ukraine

The Russian ship suffered damage incompatible with further movement - the "Ivanovets" rolled to the stern and sank.​

Ukraine claims to have destroyed a Russian warship from the Black Sea Fleet in a special operation off Russian-occupied Crimea. Ukrainian intelligence said that the small warship sank after it received direct hits to the hull.
 

dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has appointed Oleksandr Syrsky, who has led Ukraine’s ground forces since 2019, as the new head of Ukraine’s armed forces, after he dismissed General Valerii Zaluzhny.
In a post on X, Zelenskyy on Thursday thanked Zaluzhny for his two years of service, and said that the time had come for changes in the military leadership.

Russia fired cruise and ballistic missiles and Shahed-type drones at targets across Ukraine, killing at least three civilians and injuring more than 10 people, Ukrainian authorities said.
Russia targeted at least three big cities, according to the Ukrainian military, which said it intercepted 44 drones and missiles of the 64 that were launched.

Vadym Filashkin, the governor of Ukraine’s eastern Donetsk region, said Russia was firing between 1,500 and 2,500 shells and rockets at the area every day and targeting critical infrastructure. Filashkin told the Reuters news agency that Russia had dropped 200 guided aerial bombs on the front-line town of Avdiivka over the past month and was “totally destroying it”.
Separately, Vitalii Barabash, the head of Avdiivka’s military administration, said the situation there was “very difficult and in some places, critical”. About 32,000 people lived in the town, the site of Europe’s largest coking plant, before the war. Fewer than 1,000 remain, according to officials.
A two-month-old baby boy was killed and his mother injured after two Russian S-300 missiles hit Zolochiv in northeastern Ukraine, according to Kharkiv regional Governor Oleh Syniehubov. The village is 20km (12.4 miles) from Ukraine’s border with Russia. Two other people were injured in the attack, which also damaged dozens of buildings.
Ukraine said a special forces unit blew up a drilling platform in the Black Sea that Russia was using to enhance the range of its drones. Equipment on the platform was used for drones involved in attacks on Ukraine’s critical infrastructure and to control the northwestern part of the sea.
Russia’s Defence Ministry said it thwarted an alleged attack by seven Ukrainian drones on the Belgorod region. There were no reports of casualties. Vyacheslav Gladkov, the region’s governor, said four homes were damaged.

The United States and Russia traded accusations at a United Nations Security Council (UNSC) meeting on Ukraine called by Moscow. The US accused Russia of firing at least nine North Korean-supplied missiles at Ukraine and urged UNSC members to hold the two countries accountable for breaching UN sanctions on Pyongyang. Moscow, meanwhile, accused Washington of being a “direct accomplice” in last month's crash of a Russian military transport plane in the Belgorod region. Moscow has claimed Kyiv shot down the plane. Ukraine has neither confirmed nor denied its involvement and has called for an international investigation.
US President Joe Biden said Congress would play into the Kremlin’s hands if it failed to pass a $11 bn bill tying Ukraine aid to immigration curbs demanded by right-wing Republicans. Biden said the “clock is ticking” for Ukraine and criticised former President and likely 2024 rival Donald Trump for discouraging lawmakers from passing the legislation.
European Union foreign policy chief Josep Borrell visited Kyiv on a trip to underline the EU’s “unwavering support” for Ukraine.
Rafael Grossi, the chief of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) met Ukrainian Energy Minister Herman Halushchenko and other officials in Kyiv ahead of his visit to the Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant on Wednesday. Grossi noted that the number of staff at the plant had dropped from 12,000 to as few as 2,000.
A Moscow court ordered the arrest of bestselling Russian language writer Boris Akunin for allegedly spreading “disinformation” about the Russian army. The 67-year-old was charged in December last year after he expressed support for Kyiv in a phone call with Russian pranksters posing as Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy. Akunin has lived overseas since 2014.
Ukraine said it had arrested five former and current intelligence officers it said were secretly working for Russia. The SBU said the suspects were caught passing information to Russia’s FSB security service about Ukrainian military sites, its defensive fortifications, personal data and strategic energy facilities.
Norway rejected an asylum application from Andrei Medvedev who claimed to have deserted the Russian mercenary Group wagner after fighting in Ukraine for four months. The 27-year-old sought asylum after fleeing to Norway in January 2023.
A senior official with Ukraine’s intelligence agency was fired after revelations that investigative journalists including at outlet Bihus.info, had been wiretapped, a source at the agency told the AFP news agency.

Zelenskyy ordered the creation of a separate branch of Ukraine’s Armed Forces devoted to drone warfare. In December, he said Ukraine would produce a million drones in 2024.
Turkish defence company Baykar has started building a factory near Kyiv to make either its TB2 or TB3 drone models, chief executive Haluk Bayraktar told the Reuters news agency.
 
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dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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Alexei Navalny, Russian President Vladimir Putin's most formidable domestic opponent, fell unconscious and died on Friday after a walk at the "Polar Wolf" Arctic penal colony where he was serving a three-decade sentence, authorities said.
The death of Navalny , a 47-year-old former lawyer, robs the disparate Russian opposition of its most prominent leader as Putin prepares for an election which will keep the former KGB spy in power until at least 2030.
Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has died in prison, Al Jazeera reported on Friday, citing state media.
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IMAGE: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny had appeared in a hearing via a video link from the prison, in Moscow, on January 11, 2024. Photograph: Maxim Shemetov/Reuters

The death of the jailed Russian-opposition leader, 47, has been reported by state media which further cited the prison service of the Yamalo-Nenets region where he had been serving his sentence.
Al Jazeera cited a statement put out by state media quoting the prison service of the Yamalo-Nenets region which said that Navalny 'felt bad' after a walk and lost consciousness 'almost immediately'.

Russian Oppn leader Navalny goes 'missing' from jail



'Medical staff arrived immediately and an ambulance team was called. Resuscitation measures were carried out which did not yield positive results. Paramedics confirmed the death of the convict. The causes of death are being established,' the prison statement read.
Further details are awaited.
On the occasion of New Year this January, he had sent out a message on social media stating that he does not feel lonely and is in a 'great' mood, but he still misses spending time with his family and friends in person.
In a New Year's Eve message posted on social media by his team, Navalny was quoted as saying that this will be the third time 'I have taken the traditional family New Year's Eve photo with Photoshop'.
"I am trying to keep up with the times, and this time I asked an artificial intelligence to draw me. I hope it turned out something fantastic -- I will not see the picture myself until the letter with it arrives on Yamal," Navalny had said, according to CNN.
At that time, he was serving his term at the Russian Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Region's IK-3 prison colony.
Navalny has been behind bars since January 2021, when he returned to Moscow after recuperating in Germany from nerve agent poisoning that he blamed on the Kremlin.
Prior to his arrest, he campaigned against corruption and organised major anti-Kremlin protests.
He has since received three prison terms and spent months in isolation in Penal Colony Number 6 for alleged minor infractions.
A court extended Navalny's sentence to 19 years on 'extremism' charges and ruled that he be moved to a more secure, harsher prison.
Notably, Navalny had, time and again rejected all charges against him as politically motivated.
 
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dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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On February 16, 2024, the death of the jailed Russian Opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, 47, was reported by State media which further cited the prison service of the Yamalo-Nenets region where he had been serving his sentence. According to the prison service, Alexei Navalny 'felt bad' after a walk and lost consciousness 'almost immediately'. Navalny has been behind bars since January 2021, when he returned to Moscow after recuperating in Germany from nerve agent poisoning that he blamed on the Kremlin.
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IMAGE: Navalny with his wife Yulia, surrounded by supporters and the media, makes his way to the city's election commission office in central Moscow, July 10, 2013, to submit documents to get registered as a mayoral election candidate. Photograph: Grigory Dukor/
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IMAGE: Navalny and his daughter Daria meet with journalists outside a polling station in Moscow, September 8, 2019, during the Moscow city parliament election. Photograph: Tatyana Makeyeva/Reuters

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IMAGE: Navalny is seen on a screen via a video link from the IK-2 corrective penal colony in Pokrov during a court hearing to consider an appeal against his prison sentence, May 24, 2022. Photograph: Evgenia Novozhenina/Reuters
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IMAGE: Navalny, his lawyers Olga Mikhailova and Vadim Kobzev and other participants are seen on a screen via a video link during an external hearing of the Moscow city court in a new criminal case against Navalny on numerous charges, including the creation of an extremist organisation, at the IK-6 penal colony in the Vladimir region, June 19, 2023. Photograph: Evgenia Novozhenina/Reuters
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IMAGE: Navalny appears on a screen via a video link from the IK-3 penal colony in Kharp in the Yamal-Nenets region during a hearing against the ministry of justice in Russia's supreme court, January 11, 2024. Photograph: Maxim Shemetov/Reuters

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IMAGE: A person lights a candle next to a portrait of Navalny at the monument to the victims of political repression in St Petersburg, February 16, 2024, following the announcement of Navalny's death. Photograph: Reuters
 

dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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As Ukraine enters the third year of conflict against a backdrop of dwindling international support and a grim human toll, the situation has grown increasingly dire. The UN's International Organization for Migration reports over 14 million displaced, including nearly 6.5 million refugees and 3.7 million internally displaced. Although over 4.5 million people have returned to their homes, they still confront significant obstacles, including safety concerns, unemployment, damaged residences, and crumbling infrastructure, as well as overstretched services.

This extensive displacement and the array of challenges faced by those returning to Ukraine highlight the need for increased humanitarian assistance in the face of growing needs and limited resources.
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dalvinder45

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Jul 22, 2023
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UNited Sikhs Humanitarian Aid in Action

From the very beginning, has launched launched and sustained initiatives that directly impact the lives of those caught in the crossfire. Their hot meal initiative, a lifeline for hundreds of thousands of people, has been ongoing since the war's outbreak. In the Shehyni and Kharkiv regions, their volunteers have tirelessly worked, setting up camps to distribute essential aid—including hygiene and sanitation kits, groceries, medicines, and warm clothing—to thousands in need.
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Lifesaving Skills: Project Braveheart

With the launch of Project Braveheart: Trauma & Medicine in early 2022, they took a significant step forward with their ‘train-the-trainer’ program. This initiative, calling upon a wide array of volunteers—including doctors, paramedics, ex-servicemen, and civilians—demonstrates the incredible power of community in the face of adversity.
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The initiative offers military-grade first aid and emergency medical training (EMT) to Ukrainian civilians. Designed to enable ordinary individuals to provide basic treatment and save lives in critical moments. The program empowers civilians with the skills to potentially save thousands of lives across Ukraine.
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In 2023 alone, over 50,000 civilians have been empowered through this training, learning crucial skills ranging from treating fractures and wounds to conducting blood transfusions and evacuating the injured. This effort underscores United Sikhs commitment not just to immediate relief but to long-term resilience and empowerment of communities.

Recognition and Support
Their efforts have not gone unnoticed. In February 2023, the Governor of New Jersey, Phil Murphy, and First Lady Tammy Murphy, joined them at the Ukraine-Poland border, witnessing firsthand the impact of their tactical medical program and offering their support for this life-saving initiative.
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Balwant Singh (UNITED SIKHS Director), Governor of New Jersey - Phil Murphy, First Lady - Tammy Murphy along with UNITED SIKHS Volunteer Coordinators - Prabhleen Kaur, Jasleen Kaur and Daler Kaur at the UNITED SIKHS Relief Camp at the Ukraine-Poland Border
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Everyone can be a partner in this humantarian effort by donating funds or manual support.
 

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