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Gurus Guru Gobind Singh Completing Guru Nanak’s Revolution

Admin

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Jun 1, 2004
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As millions of Sikhs around the world celebrate Nanak 10, Guru Gobind Singh ji’s Parkaash Gurpurb on 5 January, 2010, we remind ourselves of the significance of his Guruship.

The “Guruship” concept in Sikh thought is a continuity through the One Light, one path (“Jote oha jugat sai”) principle. “Jugat” refers to approach or methodology, stressing that all Guru persons used the same teaching method during the period of the Ten Guru personalities. They “lived” and preached Sikh ideology founded on the philosophy of the “Mool Mantar and Japuji Sahib” revealed to Guru Nanak, while bringing the ideological revolution of Guru Nanak in all spheres of life to a successful conclusion during the period of Guru Gobind Singh.

The Guru “Jote” now resides in Guru Granth Sahib, the One and Only Guru, the Enlightener, Who reveals the Ultimate Reality to the Sikh. Guru Gobind Singh ji’s last command to the Sikhs was to be guided by that One Guide Eternal, Guru Granth Sahib, and none other.

Towards the end of the 15th century, Guru Nanak Sahib (1469 – 1539) started an ideological revolution in all spheres of life: religious, socio-educational, administrative, economic and political. He laid the foundation of a new path of truthful conduct, which combines temporal and spiritual (miri-piri) aspects of life. This miri-piri ideology is also summed up in three socio-political objectives of “degh, tegh, fateh” – “Victory of an egalitarian regime in which all share and are prepared to defend such a regime, as a last resort, with the sword of justice.

Guru Nanak condemned discrimination in any sphere of life under whatever pretext e.g. caste, creed, gender, social or economic class divisions. He condemned in the strongest words, exploitation of an ignorant (gian-vehooni) public by Hindu and Muslim priestly classes and openly condemned oppression by the rulers and administrators of his time often aided by those in religious garbs.

By the time of Guru Gobind Singh, all the egalitarian institutions of the Sikhs were well developed. The time had come for open declaration of a “Third Path” (“Tisra Panth”). This was the parting of the ways from outdated suffocative and often oppressive ideologies centred around Manuwadic Hindu traditions and Islamic fanaticism.

The Sikh martyrdom (shaheedi) tradition, which produced invincible “mar-jeevras” (spiritually reborn), was further strengthened by the “sarbansdani” Guru Gobind Singh who sacrificed his all in the Will (Bhana) of his Mittar Pyara “Waheguru” and his beloved Khalsa Sikhs.

Let us meditate on these facts of Sikh tradition and seek guidance for meeting the current and future challenges to Sikh ideology and institutions, as we celebrate the Parkash Gurpurb (birthday) of Guru Gobind Singh ji on 5 January, 1010.

(Note: Amongst these challenges are the Bipran-ki-reets (ritual and superstition based anti-Gurmat Brahmanic practices) which continue to be promoted by the highest Sikh institutions due to external political pressure. This column discusses the issue of the Nanakshahi Calendar in this context, in the next article.)
 

Bmandur

SPNer
May 16, 2008
198
235
Canada
:happykaur:As millions of Sikhs around the world celebrate Nanak 10, Guru Gobind Singh ji’s Parkaash Gurpurb on 5 January, 2010, we remind ourselves of the significance of his Guruship.

The “Guruship” concept in Sikh thought is a continuity through the One Light, one path (“Jote oha jugat sai”) principle. “Jugat” refers to approach or methodology, stressing that all Guru persons used the same teaching method during the period of the Ten Guru personalities. They “lived” and preached Sikh ideology founded on the philosophy of the “Mool Mantar and Japuji Sahib” revealed to Guru Nanak, while bringing the ideological revolution of Guru Nanak in all spheres of life to a successful conclusion during the period of Guru Gobind Singh.

The Guru “Jote” now resides in Guru Granth Sahib, the One and Only Guru, the Enlightener, Who reveals the Ultimate Reality to the Sikh. Guru Gobind Singh ji’s last command to the Sikhs was to be guided by that One Guide Eternal, Guru Granth Sahib, and none other.

Towards the end of the 15th century, Guru Nanak Sahib (1469 – 1539) started an ideological revolution in all spheres of life: religious, socio-educational, administrative, economic and political. He laid the foundation of a new path of truthful conduct, which combines temporal and spiritual (miri-piri) aspects of life. This miri-piri ideology is also summed up in three socio-political objectives of “degh, tegh, fateh” – “Victory of an egalitarian regime in which all share and are prepared to defend such a regime, as a last resort, with the sword of justice.

Guru Nanak condemned discrimination in any sphere of life under whatever pretext e.g. caste, creed, gender, social or economic class divisions. He condemned in the strongest words, exploitation of an ignorant (gian-vehooni) public by Hindu and Muslim priestly classes and openly condemned oppression by the rulers and administrators of his time often aided by those in religious garbs.

By the time of Guru Gobind Singh, all the egalitarian institutions of the Sikhs were well developed. The time had come for open declaration of a “Third Path” (“Tisra Panth”). This was the parting of the ways from outdated suffocative and often oppressive ideologies centred around Manuwadic Hindu traditions and Islamic fanaticism.

The Sikh martyrdom (shaheedi) tradition, which produced invincible “mar-jeevras” (spiritually reborn), was further strengthened by the “sarbansdani” Guru Gobind Singh who sacrificed his all in the Will (Bhana) of his Mittar Pyara “Waheguru” and his beloved Khalsa Sikhs.

Let us meditate on these facts of Sikh tradition and seek guidance for meeting the current and future challenges to Sikh ideology and institutions, as we celebrate the Parkash Gurpurb (birthday) of Guru Gobind Singh ji on 5 January, 1010.

(Note: Amongst these challenges are the Bipran-ki-reets (ritual and superstition based anti-Gurmat Brahmanic practices) which continue to be promoted by the highest Sikh institutions due to external political pressure. This column discusses the issue of the Nanakshahi Calendar in this context, in the next article.)[/quote]
Gurfateh to All Khalsa's
 

spnadmin

1947-2014 (Archived)
SPNer
Jun 17, 2004
14,500
19,212
Bmandur ji

Many thanks for writing about the legacy of Guru Gobind Singh in the large -- and helping us to understand that there is still more work to be done to make his journey our journey and to fight the oppression. In our day religious oppression still stalks the world. And in our own lives we have let the oppression of ritual and magic cloud our minds. Good reminder.
 

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