Can Sikhi Be Relevant In The Modern World As A Driver For Social Change?

sukhsingh

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How can sikh social, political and cultural traditions contribute to the modern world? Guru Nanak laid the foundations of a vision of society that transcends 'identity politics'. Is a renaissance of his radical philosophy to drive social change possible? If so what responsibilities as should we take on and how can such a 'project' be approached?
 
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How can sikh social, political and cultural traditions contribute to the modern world?
You mean how can the modern world better itself through adaptation of Sikh value n belief in finding the theory of everything ! Don't forget, Sikh is universal and not regional, hence, globalisation - unity in diversity being the objective. Unity found in values, human values overriding all else.

Guru Nanak laid the foundations of a vision of society that transcends 'identity politics'.
..says who, pls provide reliable sources ? Guru Nanak otherwise, sought to seek some sort of synthesis between the two opposing faiths in harmonising relations of the then Indian Society and bring about His own monotheistic belief, namely, Ekonkar [God is 1].
Is a renaissance of his radical philosophy to drive social change possible?
..his philosophy wasn't radical per se but rather perennial and yes, his mission was renaissance because society had then shifted from original belief, value and practice of "nam" to airy-fairy make-belief institutionalised religions. His main objective was to instil performance n moral virtues in the individual so that character over charisma ruled.
If so what responsibilities as should we take on and how can such a 'project' be approached?
..love n live
 

RD1

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How can sikh social, political and cultural traditions contribute to the modern world? Guru Nanak laid the foundations of a vision of society that transcends 'identity politics'. Is a renaissance of his radical philosophy to drive social change possible? If so what responsibilities as should we take on and how can such a 'project' be approached?

I believe Khalsa Aid is an excellent example of an organization contributing to the modern world which upholds the values of selfless service, and serves the most vulnerable, regardless of their faith, race, gender, etc.

Any society which truly promotes tolerance, equality, inclusivity, compassion, and uplifting the vulnerable, is inherently representing values that are embedded within Sikhism. But in reality, I don't think such an ideal society truly exists. There is corruption everywhere. And a true renaissance would involve society again re-awakening. Becoming more aware of the injustices in this world, how we as individuals contribute to the injustices, and then coming together to overcome it. We must re-learn the Truth. And simply remember to do 'good' whenever we can. Refrain from seeing someone else as an 'other.'
 

sukhsingh

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You mean how can the modern world better itself through adaptation of Sikh value n belief in finding the theory of everything ! Don't forget, Sikh is universal and not regional, hence, globalisation - unity in diversity being the objective. Unity found in values, human values overriding all else.


..says who, pls provide reliable sources ? Guru Nanak otherwise, sought to seek some sort of synthesis between the two opposing faiths in harmonising relations of the then Indian Society and bring about His own monotheistic belief, namely, Ekonkar [God is 1].

..his philosophy wasn't radical per se but rather perennial and yes, his mission was renaissance because society had then shifted from original belief, value and practice of "nam" to airy-fairy make-belief institutionalised religions. His main objective was to instil performance n moral virtues in the individual so that character over charisma ruled.

..love n live
Well thats it then... job done! how could i have missed it.

I believe he laid down a philosophy that transcends identity politics this is my assertion. I o't believe in the synthesis proposition..

I believe it was a radical departure in the social dynamic it created. the philosophy as expressed through cultural, social practices. Driven by individual actions guided by a morals, ethics and existential truths articulated within the guru granth sahib ji.
 

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Well thats it then... job done!
..bang on bro...
how could i have missed it.
..simple ! take off the gora glasses and see it with grandpas.
I believe he laid down a philosophy that transcends identity politics this is my assertion.
..he did nothing of the sort, he found his true self - spiritual being in a human body and capsuled it in the 3 pillars. Sikhi is spiritual, physical is its reflection.
I believe it was a radical departure in the social dynamic it created.
...as I said above, the terms radical n departure are inconsistent with spiritual Sikhism. Kindly support your claim with verifiable sources.
 

sukhsingh

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..bang on bro...

..simple ! take off the gora glasses and see it with grandpas.

..he did nothing of the sort, he found his true self - spiritual being in a human body and capsuled it in the 3 pillars. Sikhi is spiritual, physical is its reflection.

...as I said above, the terms radical n departure are inconsistent with spiritual Sikhism. Kindly support your claim with verifiable sources.
so basically you think it has nothing to contribute?
 
..simple ! take off the gora glasses and see it with grandpas.
is that what you did?
 

sukhsingh

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..bang on bro...

..simple ! take off the gora glasses and see it with grandpas.

..he did nothing of the sort, he found his true self - spiritual being in a human body and capsuled it in the 3 pillars. Sikhi is spiritual, physical is its reflection.

...as I said above, the terms radical n departure are inconsistent with spiritual Sikhism. Kindly support your claim with verifiable sources.
Brother i find your absolutism disconcerting. .

The establishment of Langar was a radical social innovation, suggesting that realising truth didn't require one to be a brahmin, suggesting that their was no difference between ram and rahim was a radical idea , subversive and dangerous infact.. challenging the structures of not just the Muslims but also brahminism.. the insofar as instead of speaking about these things existentially and philosophy in ratified circles the gurus established communities that lived by their principles. . Guru teg buhadur was tested on his belief and gave his head for the right to people to practice there religion even though the practices of those he was defending were anathema to him. That was radical. Can you please provide some comment as to how this was now radical. . These ideas are radical today never mind 5 centuries ago
 
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If Sikhism is universal, what difference does it make which colour his glasses are?
...culture dear Watson, culture ! The three constituents of the developed human being are genetic, environmental and cultural. It is impossible for someone brought up in UK to appreciate and appropriate Indian culture. The whole conglomeration is at a variance; can a European really know about the emotions of an Indian ?
 

sukhsingh

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...culture dear Watson, culture ! The three constituents of the developed human being are genetic, environmental and cultural. It is impossible for someone brought up in UK to appreciate and appropriate Indian culture. The whole conglomeration is at a variance; can a European really know about the emotions of an Indian ?
Wow can you please describe define what "Indian culture" is?
 

sukhsingh

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...culture dear Watson, culture ! The three constituents of the developed human being are genetic, environmental and cultural. It is impossible for someone brought up in UK to appreciate and appropriate Indian culture. The whole conglomeration is at a variance; can a European really know about the emotions of an Indian ?
Culture is not static.. also can you please tell me what the three constituents of a 'undeveloped' human are. .and whilst you're at it I'm quite interested what a developed human is and by definition what a undeveloped human is. .
I think we should also look at the premise of your assertion that Indian culture is homogeneous. . Can you also help me understand what the characteristics are of a culture. .
 

sukhsingh

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...culture dear Watson, culture !
So to ask the question harry posed again.. If sikhi is universal and the gurus told us we are all one the truth of which is clouded by maya by creating social constructs, articulated via religious, ethnic, economical, ideological, gender, nationalistic, cultural etc differences how does it matter which colour the glasses are?

To quote William Blake

"If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro' narrow chinks of his cavern."

Take the glasses off bro
 

Harry

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some would say it is Punjabi culture that has caused the most problems,

definition of culture is "the ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society"

Would you not agree that if anything, the Gurus tried to move away from the culture of the time to move towards a culture of truth?

Do you feel the current situation in the land of the five reflects truth? What does the current culture say? What facets can you outline that compliment Sikhism more than any other culture?

If this culture is so important, what are you doing in the West? Why did you come to the West?

If Sikhism is truly universal, culture should be irrelevant, however, I would be interested to know what facets of Punjabi culture you seem to eager to cherish? Its just that through my gora coconut spectacles, it looks like a bit of a mess to me, I guess for you its safer to use your granpas specs, it means no one has to do anything, just acquiesce and turn a blind eye.
 

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Pyari Saad Sangat Ji - a very good morning !

Respected H,

Working with your definition of culture would mean in a sense, a social heritage. Virtually a set of solutions to problems that, in the course of time, others before us have met and solved. That is to say, the learned behaviour, or social inheritance, of any society in a given timeframe is called culture.

It is the possession of a common culture and the ability to communicate and pass it on to others that distinguishes the human species from other animals. The mediums of transportation are namely, language, which of course, is a product of culture. Language has to be learned in the same way as other elements of culture. Once that is done, individuals move on to acquire the rest of their choreographic cultural make. The process through which culture is acquired is called "socialisation".

In your case, two things stops you short of "realising" the cultural choreography and the aesthetic beauty of the land of five-alive:
1. Language
2. Punjabi Society [for socialisation sake].

I often quote that how can a European know the emotions of a Chinese when both the environment and culture stand poles apart. It is clear from their vantage perspectives that there will be differences which will impact their outlook [glasses].

I wish to add more but have a tight agenda, pls accept my apologies!

Love you -
TC
 

sukhsingh

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Pyari Saad Sangat Ji - a very good morning !

Respected H,

Working with your definition of culture would mean in a sense, a social heritage. Virtually a set of solutions to problems that, in the course of time, others before us have met and solved. That is to say, the learned behaviour, or social inheritance, of any society in a given timeframe is called culture.

It is the possession of a common culture and the ability to communicate and pass it on to others that distinguishes the human species from other animals. The mediums of transportation are namely, language, which of course, is a product of culture. Language has to be learned in the same way as other elements of culture. Once that is done, individuals move on to acquire the rest of their choreographic cultural make. The process through which culture is acquired is called "socialisation".

In your case, two things stops you short of "realising" the cultural choreography and the aesthetic beauty of the land of five-alive:
1. Language
2. Punjabi Society [for socialisation sake].

I often quote that how can a European know the emotions of a Chinese when both the environment and culture stand poles apart. It is clear from their vantage perspectives that there will be differences which will impact their outlook [glasses].

I wish to add more but have a tight agenda, pls accept my apologies!

Love you -
TC
Culture is never static nor is it homogenous. . There are many cultures that Coexist around any geographical location. T g e panjab is quite possibly one of the most culturally diverse areas in the world. With differing languages dialects, folk tradition, intellectual traditions drawing on vedic. Greek. Buddhist central Asian histories not mention through successive invasions genetically panjabi people are hugely diverse. Today we have to panjabs which have common cultural traditions.

I think your explanation offers some insight but is limited. The experiences of poor dalit and the experiences they have and how culture intercedes within there life is very different than that of land owning jat.


However we digress from the question posed in this post.
 

RD1

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If sikhi is universal and the gurus told us we are all one the truth of which is clouded by maya by creating social constructs, articulated via religious, ethnic, economical, ideological, gender, nationalistic, cultural etc differences how does it matter which colour the glasses are?

Getting back to the original question posed in this thread, perhaps the way to drive social change is to now deconstruct the social constructs that you have listed. Religion, gender, race, socioeconomic status, etc., create "otherness," enhance ego, and perpetuate seeing people as different, and separate from ourselves. The whole idea of oneness is completely lost. We begin to fixate on these superficial differences, at the expense of the innate connection we all share. We stop seeing humans as simply humans, as spiritual beings.

Perhaps we need to re-frame our mindsets to first and foremost see others as spiritual beings, as manifestations of the One. And maybe we have a hard time doing this, because we cannot see our selves as spiritual beings first and foremost. We get too lost in the labels we give ourselves, and society gives us. We attach to these labels, and therefore see others through arbitrary labels, and see others through assumption and stereotypes these labels hold.
 
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