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Spiritual Turban

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by Singhji80, Jul 26, 2016.

  1. Singhji80

    Singhji80 United Kingdom
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    My father passed away last year and I was given a turban cloth to pray on. My uncles said it would bring good luck to me.

    Does anyone know the meaning to this? How would it accomplish this? What if I lose it?
     
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  3. chazSingh

    chazSingh Ireland
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    First i've heard of this...i really don;t know if this will give you good luck or not...

    best to consult Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji...

    In short it says "As you sow, shall you reap" ... so plant seeds of goodness and see what happens :) no need for good luck...

    Then it says to Meditate and put your Dyaan on the one, the Ek...

    i think, if you still to this, you'll be well on your way...
     
  4. swarn bains

    swarn bains United States
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    when father passes away then at the final bhog (prayer) time the turban is tied on the head of the oldest son and all the relatives who are at the bhog donate some money dsepending upon their capabilities to him. The reason for this is that he becomes the head of the family and takes over all decision making and other responsibilities
     
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  5. Original

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    Dear Sir

    Please accept my sincere condolences on the loss of your father. Death is the only certain thing in life, which none of us will escape. That knowledge is perhaps the defining feature of the human condition. The afterlife factor brought in by Sikhism provides a level of comfort and forethought. It offers, if you like, existential solace, but no magical powers I'm afraid.

    The turban holds a special place in human history. It is both a symbol of status quo and has religious connotations, but like I said, no mythological secrets. Have a read of the Bible to get a head start on the meaning and understanding - Ezekiel 21:26 .

    Take care _ Gdnight n Godbless
     
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  6. chazSingh

    chazSingh Ireland
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    Ahh OK....I.ve never seen this being done.
    I guess it is more cultural or tradition than of the spirit.

    God bless ji
     
  7. Harry Haller

    Harry Haller United Kingdom
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    Good luck is all very well, and I am sorry to hear of your fathers passing, but if it were me, I would probably just keep it so that I could still smell and feel it, if I were to lose it, it would be the loss of that connection to my father that I would miss, rather than any talisman effect.
     
  8. Sikhilove

    Sikhilove United Kingdom
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    There is no such thing as luck, only Karam.

    Praying on a turban cloth is ritual- we don't perform rituals. Guru Gobind Singh Ji told us that the only way to meet Him is through Love.

    The whole of Sikhi teaches Pure Unconditional Love. That's Truth.
     
  9. Harry Haller

    Harry Haller United Kingdom
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    You see the problem with statements like this is that they do not actually make any sense. Yes, we do perform rituals of course we do, let us look at the meaning of ritual,

    a religious or solemn ceremony consisting of a series of actions performed according to a prescribed order according to google,

    so I can deduce that most of what happens on a Sunday in most Gurdwaras is ritual, it is possible you are talking about pointless ritual, but then the point is normally subjective anyway. Could you explain your meaning of Karam, it is possible we may have to open another thread depending on the answer.

    Could you also define unconditional love, is that to love people no matter what? if that is the case, I have to disagree with you as our Gurus knew when to draw the line, which makes it conditional, rather than unconditional, surely only a fool would love unconditionally..
     
  10. Original

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    People,

    Step at a time pls, and that too, tread with care and caution. Reread post #3, Swarn Singh provides the rationale behind it. Ritual has nothing to do with it. It is customary full stop. When the father dies the bestowing of the turban unto the eldest male, usually the son of the family has social and not religious connotations. This concept is traditionally held and customary executed.

    Chew on some of the traditional and customary practices to get an idea within which Sikhism came to be. And then, try n dichotomise between what is social and religious before firing on all six.

    Much obliged
     
  11. Singhji80

    Singhji80 United Kingdom
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    Thanks guys. I still take it to the Gurdwara with me to pray on. Making sure it's in a clean carrier bag and doesn't get dirty.
     
  12. Sikhilove

    Sikhilove United Kingdom
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    Praying on a turban or in the bathroom doesn't make a difference. God Is everywhere. You're bring in ritual into it. Love is beyond ritual. Ritual is different to discipline which denotes love.
     
  13. Sikhilove

    Sikhilove United Kingdom
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    Praying on a turban or in the bathroom doesn't make a difference. God Is everywhere. You're bring in ritual into it. Love is beyond ritual. Ritual is different to discipline which denotes love.
     
  14. swarn bains

    swarn bains United States
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    I guess you got to learn how English language operates or translated. who is worshipping and where is he worshipping
     
  15. Sikhilove

    Sikhilove United Kingdom
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    Hi Harry

    The Gurdwarra is where Gurbani is read and is supposed to be understood and applied to daily life.

    It symbolises the upper doors of the body temple, sitting in a gurdwarra is supposed to assist us in being able to sit grounded in our own homes (bodies), which is then supposed to be kept up whilst working and playing in the outside world.

    Gurbani is not ritual, it is gyan. Listening to Gurbani without making any effort to apply or even understand it is pointless ritual and a disrespect of the gyan being imparted.

    Unconditional Love is to be single visioned, to see Truth in All and hence love Him in all. The Gurus knew that everyone was at their own stage of learning. They saw Truth in every moghul and every action which is why they accepted karam no matter how awful with peace in th hearts. Guru ji himself said God came in the form of a moghul emporer . But they taught self Defence and taught to have good sangat. Sangat that is not lost in the Maya illusion and hurting others.
     
  16. Harry Haller

    Harry Haller United Kingdom
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    I would call it blinkered, there is more in this world that just love, or do you feel all is love?

    You have not stated your definition of karam, if you could supply this we can continue
    could you point out the source for this?
     
  17. Sikhilove

    Sikhilove United Kingdom
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    Yep all Him/True Love. Everything else comes after this initial realisation of Nirboah and Nirvair.


    We reap what we sow- it's really that simple. Why live to complication?

    Rag Asa, pg. 360)
    Having attacked Khuraasaan, Babar terrified Hindustan. The Creator Himself does not take the blame, but has sent the Mugal as the messenger of death.
     
  18. Harry Haller

    Harry Haller United Kingdom
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    please go on, so hate is a corrupt manifestation? love gone wrong? again, no sarcasm, genuinely interested.

    reap what we sow I like, sin in this life come back as an ant I am unsure of, which is closest to your definition of karam?

    sending someone and adopting forms are two very different things my friend
     
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  19. Original

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    Good morning Everyone,

    Hope my uninvited intrusion has some conducive value, pls allow me a squeeze - thank you !

    I think I've used the term "teleological" in some of my write-ups a lot, roots of which can be found in antiquity philosophy. What it basically means is that there is a purpose and a meaning to all known phenomena. Flowing from it as it were, theories and ideologies that have sprung up in trying to rationalise and make it digestible for human consumption. In so doing, theoretical thinkers have coined specific terms, one of which is "karm". In its literal meaning, karm is "action", be that in deed or thought. The rationale behind such a conceptual tool has philosophical properties ascribed to it, that is, that all actions produce an effect [cause n effect]. And, that humans are distinct as a species for having the nuance to label actions and things as "good" or "bad" or right n wrong [moral law]. This as a result necessitates and obligates humans to have a framework within which human action can both be explained and understood. In other words, the action that leads us "up" the path is labelled "good" [value statement, in that it serves our need] and the action that leads us "down" is labelled as "bad" [again a value judgement, in that it goes against human need]. Human needs are biological and psychological, essential for human survival. Taken together to explain theoretical thinking behind Sikhism requires knowledge of both, its ideology and theory. Nanak provided a theory like any other theory with certain specific terms to carry forward meaning and purpose [teleology]. Nanak's premises were that there is the immortal soul, that God exists and that humans have a degree of freewill within which human action [karm] can be evaluated. In other words a moral necessity. And, since the question of God cannot have objective grounding and only subjective, it boils down to the fact, do you believe Nanak or you don't. It's that simple I'm afraid. Sikhism is therefore and rightly so, categorised as a system of "belief", confirming as it were the existence of Nanak's God, Ekonkar.

    I'm sorry I've rushed, have an early morning meeting!

    Take care - Ciao !
     
    #18 Original, Aug 3, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2016
  20. Sikhilove

    Sikhilove United Kingdom
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    Lol God serves the karam. How we're served it is up to him.

    Millions are the regions above; millions the regions below;

    Millions are the species taking birth.

    By diverse means does He spread Himself.

    Again and again did He expand Himself thus,

    But He ever remains the One Ekankar.

    Countless creatures of various kinds

    Come out of Him and are absorbed back.

    None can know the limit of His Being;

    He, the Lord, O Nanak! is all in all Himself.
    — (SGGS. 275-76)

    He is all yet remains detached from all.

    Hes the knower of all hearts and discovers through us- he is Truth- pure consciousness and love.

    U can try and rationalise it but its beyond rationalisation. Truth is beyond worldly logic.
     
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  21. Harry Haller

    Harry Haller United Kingdom
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    you have not answered any of my questions, do you wish me to list them for you?
     

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