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Why call a Gurudwara, a Gurughar?

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by BALWANT SINGH, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. BALWANT SINGH

    BALWANT SINGH
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    I am not asking for an argument, but it concerns me when our Sikh tv channel presenters use the word 'Guru-ghar' instead of Gurdwara. How inappropriate the word Ghar is, apparently the word Gurughar doesn't exist in punjabi dictionary. I can't understand why and where did this word come from?

    Refering to dictionary 'Ghar' is a house and dwar/duara is a temple. Therefore I humbly request all TV presenters to correct themselves and use the correct word as "GURDWARA".

    Waheguru ji ka Khalsa,
    Waheguru ji ki Fateh.

    Aap da das
    Balwant Singh
     
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  3. Ambarsaria

    Ambarsaria Canada
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    Balwant Singh ji thanks for raising the topic.

    As much as close to primary sources of information I gather the following,


    Gurdwara: The Sikh temple is called a Gurdwara. The word 'Gurdwara' means 'Gateway to the Guru'. (SGPC Amritsar website)
    Where Gur/Guru in this case implies (Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji)​
    As for as I know Gurdwara is what I have learnt myself and many times one will say, "Aaj Gurdwareh jan nu jee kardah" i.e. My mind wishes to go to the Gurdwara.

    Gurughar: It literally translates to two syllables of "Guru" and "Ghar". Which is "House that Guru is in". (my interpretation)
    Where Guru in this case implies (Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji)

    So the distinction becomes as what is more appropriate or if both are appropriate:

    Gateway: Gateway has many connotation including an entrance/exit, etc.

    Ghar: I have heard the Dixie Gurdwara (Canada) also referred to by the Gyani ji there as (Dixie) Guru Ghar while in congregation.

    So to me it seems that the following may be appropriate,


    • While outside and referring to a location: Use Gurdwara
    • While in the Gurdwara and you want to refer to where you are: Use Gurughar
      • All Gurughars are the same
      • There can be different Gurdwara Sahibs to identify more location or identifiers to guide
    As when you enter any Gurdwara you get where the Guru (Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji) is present or Gurughar.
    Note: Great caution to not call it where God lives. God is everywhere within and without Gurus and Gurdwara Sahibs as so lucidly described in mool mantar.

    Just some thoughts and my opinion only so forgive any indiscretions.

    Regards,

    Sat Sri Akal.
     
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  4. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Ambarsaria ji

    I agree with nearly all you have said. Just want to add -- the Gurdwara -- in the sense of gateway to the guru -- can also imply "threshold." Standing in the spot between being inside and outside. Which has the connotation of being on the edge of finding yourself with the Satguru, on the edge of obtaining, having that meeting, being joined. In the spiritual and metaphoric sense of gateway, or threshold. Just on the verge of being where you want to be.

    I don't think that Guru -ghar conveys the same sense of the spiritual. If it does, then I missed it.
     
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  5. Ambarsaria

    Ambarsaria Canada
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    spnadmin ji that is even a finer refinement.

    In a sense at the Gateway (Gurdwara) you look up to with excitement, curiousity and visions of what to find inside.

    Once inside the Gurughar you are humbled, serene and peaceful having found and beginning to understand.

    I found this dichotomy when we used to quite regularly visit Darbar Sahib in Amritsar (we rarely called it Harmandir Sahib as kids). Once you came from Hall Bazar side you will be in awe and excitement as you washed your feet and entered. Once inside the Golden Temple and sitting upstairs from where you could hear the kirtan below, it was peaceful, serene as anything even for me as a kid. Very very different experiences. No matter how often I visited I could feel the same way.

    Sat Sri Akal.

    PS: I hope Confused ji does not comment and boil it down to some basic stuff and put me to shame. Maybe my mind got trained into this experience thingy in repeat visits. peacesign
     
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  6. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Well, Ambarsaria ji, my mind is not working at full gear tonight. I am blaming the bitter cold. Brain freeze. :) Just very content that you could make sense of what I wrote.
     
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  7. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    spnadmin Ji..BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR. my sympathies...here its now daily 30degrees Celcius..the car feels like an OVEN after a half hour parking...:redturban:
     
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