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General What are the Effective Water Saving Irrigation Techniques ?

Discussion in 'Hard Talk' started by Astroboy, Aug 12, 2008.

  1. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
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    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
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    What kinds of Water Saving Irrigation Techniques (for Agricultural purposes) can be used effectively in arid and semi-arid regions ?
     
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  3. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
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    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
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  4. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
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    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
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    [​IMG] Tomatoes are desert friendly vegetables.
    The desert is a dry and arid place. You can grow great vegetables in your garden, despite this unrelenting climate. Desert gardening simply requires a little time and a little know how.

    TOMATO
    Contrary to popular belief, tomato is not acid forming; it contains a great deal of citric acid but is alkaline when it enters the blood stream. It increases the alkalinity of the blood and helps remove toxins, especially uric acid, from the system. As a liver cleanser, tomatoes are wonderful, especially when used with the green vegetable juices.
    Tomatoes are the richest of all foods in vitamins. They are very rich in the important vitamins like A, B and C. Unripe or half-ripe tomatoes are also effective in stomach disorders.
    It is easily digestible and is recommended for invalids and especially in fevers, diabetes and after long fasts. Being a rich source of vitamin A, it is a dependable preventive against eye troubles. It contains other minerals like iron, calcium, sulphur and potassium also.
    As Medicine:
    • A glass of fresh tomato juice taken daily cleanses the system and prevents hardening of the arteries.
    • Tomato juice keeps the blood stream alkaline and thus maintains high resistance to disease.
    • Being a rich source of vitamin A, it is dependable preventive against eye troubles.
    • Half-ripe tomatoes are very useful in hot summer months as they prevent sunstroke or heat stroke.
    Growing tomatoes the desert way takes a little adapting

    Carrie White, Tribune

    When Janet Howe tried to grow tomatoes in Queen Creek after moving from Denver, the results were dismal. "I tried to plant the same time of year I planted there," says Howe. She tried planting long-maturing varieties like the ones her father had grown in Missouri. Plastic pots also proved a problem in the Arizona sun.
    "If you created a checklist of everything you could do wrong, I did it," says Howe. She found that out after taking classes at the Desert Botanical Garden and the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, both in Phoenix. Now Howe is a master gardener and knows something about successful tomato growing. And the first thing, if you’re from somewhere else, is to forget everything you thought you knew about growing the fruit.
    "I will be starting my tomatoes over Christmas," says Howe of the Roma, grape and cherry seeds she plants in pots inside. Using a grow light, the plants remain indoors until they are roughly 1 foot tall — late February or early March. Raised beds will be their home thereafter, soil enriched with compost and mulch. Soaker hoses, which eliminate waste, supply the water.
    "You want tomatoes that mature in fewer days," says Jim Williford, of Phoenix, a master gardener. A tomato that bears fruit in less than 80 days after being set out will work here if you plant the seeds inside now.
    "Above 80 days and you’re pushing the envelope," he says. "Don’t ever plant in the same spot." Tomato plants are highly susceptible to disease, so waiting three to four years to repeat at a site is best.
    A lot of people overwater tomatoes, he says, but the fruit doesn’t like wet roots, so well-draining soil is a must.
    Howe recommends watering every other day and applying enough water to flush salts past the root ball. "Before I put the plant in the ground I pinch off all but three or four leaves on the top," she says. This helps the plant grow stronger.
    But Williford simply transplants his tomatoes "real deep" so that only a few top leaves protrude.
    As far as sun for the plant, plan on full exposure until about 11 a.m. Thereafter, particularly when temperatures get above 100 degrees, the plant should be protected from the intense rays of the sun. Howe uses a 50 percent shade cloth.
    "I was harvesting tomatoes all through the early summer," Howe says of her first successful crop this year. Using these techniques, she’s planning on a repeat performance.

    Taken from various sources.

     
  5. Sinister

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  6. Sinister

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    Source:

    Innovation in irrigation 2007: Harnessing Melbourne's storms


    Stormwater is the way of the future for Melbourne's Albert Park, with plans to use run-off from the surrounding city to top-up Albert Park Lake, irrigate sports fields and picnic areas and improve year 'round recreation on the lake.

    Once operational, the harvested stormwater will replace an estimated 100 megalitres of potable water. In the meantime, state-of-the-art irrigation technology is minimising the amount of water that is being used.

    Albert Park is located approximately three kilometres from Melbourne's central business district. Unique in Australia, it is 225 hectares in size, with a 50 hectare lake and 27 playing fields that cater to more than 50 sporting clubs. It is also an important wildlife sanctuary and the focus for many of Victoria's spectacular events - including the Formula One Grand Prix.

    Albert Park Manager Philip Ross says there is a strong commitment to be as efficient as possible, with large volumes of water involved in keeping the park in good shape.

    "As community awareness increased and expectations changed about lush, green open space parkland in summer, we were able to make significant management changes," Mr Ross said.
    "Everything was reviewed in 2002, including the species of grass being grown, which areas to water and how often, infrastructure and sources of water, all with the help of Melbourne University's expertise.

    "The first step was changing to more drought tolerant grass and to stop watering everything and concentrate on sporting fields and picnic areas.

    "We also posed a challenge: help us design an irrigation system that will practically run itself, provide remote access, monitor soil moisture and take into account weather conditions.

    "The result is a software system which now manages irrigation for the entire park and a significant investment in infrastructure, setting a new standard in flexibility and size."

    The computer-controlled system can be set up in three ways: to deliver a set volume of water across the park; to keep the soil at a certain moisture level; or to factor in grass types and ensure maximum growth.

    "Different grass types have different watering needs; we also have to factor in what the area's used for, as playing fields need to be in better condition than picnic areas," Mr Ross said.

    "We didn't make the most of the system when the first sections were installed, but it didn't take long to learn that it had amazing flexibility.
    "Additional ring mains have been put in so we can water cricket wickets separately to the outfield if we want to get them ready for a big match or remove them in preparation for the football season.
    "Each sprinkler head also has 'part circle' capability, which means if you have marquees in the grounds for the Grand Prix, for instance, you can water right up to the canvas without getting it wet."
    Potable water savings are estimated to be around 30 percent compared to before installation of the irrigation system, which was carried out with funding from Parks Victoria and the Victorian Department of Sport and Recreation.

    The move to recycled water is being done in conjunction with Parks Victoria, the state Department of Sustainability and Environment, Melbourne Water and the City of Port Phillip.

    Stormwater from the lake's natural catchment and the city to the east is directed into stormwater treatment ponds where the water settles and nutrients are removed as the water flows through to the lake.

    "Stormwater was already going through Albert Park, but it wasn't reaching the lake except when storms created an overflow. Melbourne Water, consultants and our own engineers worked together to make sure we captured all of it.

    "Heavy rain can see water back up in the pipes and we had to make sure it wouldn't cause flooding. We also had to install traps to catch rubbish off the streets and increase the vegetation in the settling ponds to deal with the nutrients.

    "Our eventual aim is for Albert Park to be self-sufficient for water, with the grounds irrigated from the lake," Mr Ross said.

    "However, Albert Park Lake is an important habitat for birds and other wildlife, and is used for sailing, rowing and other water sports. None of these factors can be considered in isolation, so the irrigation will have to be managed to ensure sustainability from a whole-of-park perspective.

    "The stormwater is already producing benefits though. Water levels have remained well above those experienced in the drought of 2003, which has protected habitat, improved conditions for water sports, and made the lake more visually appealing for visitors to the park."
    When the lake is full and it rains, the additional stormwater flows out to Port Phillip Bay, which is not far away.

    The quality of this water has been much improved by the diversion through the ponds, filtration systems and Albert Park Lake.
    "Albert Park is unique in that it's so close to the city, has such a large lake, and so many playing fields. That lends itself to the use of stormwater for irrigation," Mr Ross said.

    "We've recognised the opportunity and we're working with others to make it happen.

    "However, nothing we've done is ground-breaking and the technology isn't new - it's just never been done before to this scale that we know of.

    "I'm sure there are many other cities, parks, and lakes that could also benefit from recycling to cut the use of potable water for irrigation."
     
  8. Sinister

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    Namjap ji,
    this seems very practical

    Center Pivot Irrigation

    [​IMG]


    produces round fields instead of square (not good for areas that practice intensive agriculture...like in northern India...because a substantial amount of surface area/land is wasted because it is left fallow.... fields cannot overlap.)

    [​IMG]


    always been fascinated/interested with agriculture
    shame we have to move to big polluted cities to make a living. :p

    cheers
     

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