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Festivals Universal Message of Vaisakhi is Well-Being of the Entire Mankind

Discussion in 'History of Sikhism' started by spnadmin, Apr 11, 2011.

  1. spnadmin

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    It should be kept in mind that Guru Gobind Singh has emphatically declared, “Treat the whole human race as one. It is only through love that you can obtain God. I like a Sikh who leads a disciplined life. Rather he is my master and I am his servant.” Therefore the true and meaningful message of Vaisakhi celebration is to spread the message of love, brotherhood, oneness of God, oneness of human rare, service to mankind and to forget divisions, hatred, rivalry, selfishness, hypocrisy, business in the name of religion and exploitation of ignorant masses by showering them with false blessings.

    By- Gian Singh Kotli Vancouver.

    Like the birthday of Guru Nanak who founded Sikhism about five centuries ago, Vaisakhi is also a very sacred celebration for the Sikhs as it is the birthday of saint-soldier Khalsa created by Guru Gobind Singh in April 1699. Keeping in view the significance of this day, the Sikhs in Metro Vancouver and elsewhere in the world are enthusiastically arranging for impressive celebrations. Vaisakhi is so called as it falls on the 1st day of the month of Vaisakh of the Bikrami Calendar in India

    It should be kept in mind that Guru Gobind Singh has emphatically declared, “Treat the whole human race as one. It is only through love that you can obtain God. I like a Sikh who leads a disciplined life. Rather he is my master and I am his servant.” Therefore the true and meaningful message of Vaisakhi celebration is to spread the message of love, brotherhood, oneness of God, oneness of human rare, service to mankind and to forget divisions, hatred, rivalry, selfishness, hypocrisy, business in the name of religion and exploitation of ignorant masses by showering them with false blessings.
    In order to clear some misconceptions these days about the Kirpan (sword) and turban worn by Sikhs I would like to say few words about their religious significance. At the time of initiating his followers into the Khalsa fold Guru Gobind Singh ordained them to wear five articles of faith (5-Ks). 1. Kesh (Unshorn hair- to be kept respectfully covered with a turban), symbol of saintliness. 2. Kangha (wooden comb) for cleaning hair. 3. Kara (Iron bracelet) symbol of restraint and Omnipresence of God. 4. Kirpan (sword) symbol of courage and confidence. 5. Kachhera (specially tailored shorts) symbol of chastity and agility. The Guru also made it mandatory for the Khalsa not to use tobacco in any form, not to use intoxicants and not to commit adultery.

    The message of Vaisakhi is very much relevant in the present day world torn by hatred, crimes, wars, fanaticism and killing of humans in the name of religion. In this respect Guru Gobind Singh has uttered these wonderful soothing words which are nothing short of a universal call for world peace. “The temple and the mosque are the same, Puja (Hindu prayer) and Nimaz (Muslim prayer) are the same, the Puran (Scripture of the Hindus) and Quran (holy book of the Muslims) are the same, all humans are one. They are the creation of one Creator. Recognize the whole human race as one.”

    In connection with Vaisakhi celebration the Sikh community is taking out two massive Nagar Kirtans (Sikh Parades) on 16 April in Surrey arranged by Gurdwara Dasmesh Darbar Sahib and on 23rd April in Vancouver by Gurdwara Khalsa Diwan Society, the oldest pioneer Society of the Sikhs in Canada established in 1906.

    As in previous year, this year too both the Nagar Kirtans will draw thousands and thousands of devotees and spectators. There will be a great fanfare on the road and on footpaths. The vast variety of free food served to all on both sides of the streets all along the path has always been an amazing spectacle hard to describe. That is good. But what about the holy presence of holy Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the eternal Guru of the Sikhs, when it is decorated on a truck and made to pass along the streets resounding with boisterous music, absurd singing, dancing, ear-piercing drum beating, oft-repeated irrelevant talks, shouting and the like. Definitely all this is disrespect to the sacredness of Sri Guru Granth Sahib and it also taints the sanctity of holy Nagar Kirtan.

    This can be all right for an ordinary Jaloos (political parade), but not for Nagar Kirtan which stands for devotedly singing holy hymns in the town.
    The noteworthy point is that apart from arranging a big gathering very little is done to advance the promotion of religion, educating the youth, distribution of timely and relevant literature, and persuading the masses towards core values of the religion. Every time the same old routine is repeated in which our younger generation is least interested.

    People seem to have no interest in such mind boggling oft-repeated lofty talks and slogans in our congregations mostly against our own brethren, leaders, routinely blaming others, governments and foreign agencies. We have every right to say anything but not in our purely religious ceremonies at the cost of forgetting our religious values. Our religious congregations are not the right place for all this.

    Vaisakhi of the Khalsa does not stand for merely performing some rituals and meaningless ceremonies in a lavish manner rather it stands for gaining Gurmat knowledge and living a practical life accordingly. But we are too much infested by divisions and rivalry. We must practically unite together as the children of one Father for which we always pray in the Gurdwaras. It is rightly said that by wearing the hide of a tiger, an *** can not become a tiger. By pretending to be a religious man, wearing a long religious garb and adoring yourself with saintly clothes, you cannot become a good man. You are good only if you do good deeds. The final judgment will be delivered by God on the basis of your good and bad deeds, not on the basis of your rich costume, mere repetition of hymns or costly rituals.

    This is the essence and inherent message of Guru Gobind Singh on Vaisakhi day. Therefore in this age of unrest, strife and turmoil Guru Gobind Singh’s message of love, peace and service can provide the much needed soothing touch to the entire mankind.

    On Vaisakhi day let this prayer of Guru Gobind Singh is the prayer for all.
    “O God, give me this blessing that I may
    never refrain from doing good deeds.”


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