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The Five Evils & Moral Values

Discussion in 'Spiritual Articles' started by Archived_Member16, Aug 8, 2005.

  1. Archived_Member16

    Archived_Member16
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    http://www.sikhtempledallas.org/youth/fiveevil.html

    The Five Evils


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    Kaam : refers to lust and illegitimate sex. It is one of the greatest evils that tempts people away from God. It makes an individual weak-willed and unreliable. Normal sexual relationhip as a house-holder is not restricted in any way in Sikhism. But sex outside marriage or sex against the will of the partner is taboo, as it can cause unlimited sorrows.

    Krodh : is anger and needs to be controlled. A person overcome by 'krodh' loses his balance of mind and becomes incapable of thinking. According to Sikhism, 'krodh' takes a person away from God as hatred has no place in religious practise.

    Lobh : means greed, a strong desire to possess what rightfully belongs to others. It makes an individual selfish and self-centred. It takes a person away from his religious and social duties. A person can become blind with greed if an effort to control the desire for unlimited possessions is not made.

    Moh : refers to the strong attachment that an individual has to worldly possessions and relationships. It blurs the perspective of a human being and makes him narrow minded. It deviates a person from his moral duties and responsibilities and leads him towards a path of sin.

    Ahankar : means false pride due to one's possessions, material wealth, intelligence or powers. It gives an individual a feeling that he is superior to others and therefore they are at a lower level than him. It leads to jealousy, feelings of enmity and restlessness amongst people. Sikhism requires that a person serves the society and community with humility. Hence, the practise of cleaning the footwear of visitors to a Gurudwara is followed by many devout Sikhs.



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    8 VIRTUES TO COMBAT THE 5 EVILS

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    Wisdom (gyan) : is the complete knowledge of a set of religious principles. It can be achieved by hearing good, thinking good and doing good. A man of wisdom tries to achieve a high moral standard in his life and interaction with others. According to Sikhism, the first steps to wisdom is to consider oneself as an ignorant person who has to learn a lot in life.

    Truthful Living (sat) : This is more than 'truth'. It means living according to the way of God i.e. the thoughts should match the words that a person speaks and his actions should also match his words. Truthful living brings a person closer to God.

    Justice (niaon) : means freedom and equal oppurtunities for all. Respect for the rights of others and strict absence of attempts to exploit a fellowbeing. Sikhism forbids the desire to loot anothers property. It also strictly instructs the Sikhs to show respect even for the women and children of an enemy.

    Temperance (santokh) : means self control which has to be developed through meditation and prayers. A Sikh has to banish evil thoughts from his mind by constantly repeating Gods name and reciting prayers. Torture to the body to develop self-control is not advocated in Sikhism.

    Patience (dhiraj) : implies a high level of tolerance and empathy for others. It requires control over ones ego and willingness to overlook anothers weakness or mistakes. It requires that a Sikh should be strongwilled, but kind hearted.

    Courage (himmat) : means bravery i.e. absence of fear. It is the ability to stake ones life for ones convictions and for saving others from injustice or cruelty.

    Humility (namarta) : is a deliberate denial of pleasure at one's own praise and admiration. It means underplaying ones own strengths and respecting the abilities of others. It is the antidote to 'ahankar'

    Contentment (sabar) : means refraining from worldly fears and submitting oneself to the will of God. The typical worldly fears can be fear of death, poverty, disrespect and defeat. It is this virtue that has given the Sikhs the moral strength to withstand the various atrocities committed on their community in the last three centuries.
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    http://userpages.umbc.edu/~tmccau1/flash/5evils.txt
    MORAL EVILS
    Sikhism.
    Kam(Lust), Krodh(Anger), Lobh(Greed), Moh(Wordly attachment), Ahankar(Pride).
    Kam Krodh Lobh Moh Ahankar

    Kaam : refers to lust and illegitimate sex. It is one of the greatest evils that tempts people away from God. It makes an individual weak-willed and unreliable. Normal sexual relationship as a house-holder is not restricted in any way in Sikhism. But sex outside marriage or sex against the will of the partner is taboo, as it can cause unlimited sorrows.


    Krodh : is anger and needs to be controlled. A person overcome by 'krodh' loses his balance of mind and becomes incapable of thinking. According to Sikhism, 'krodh' takes a person away from God as hatred has no place in religious practice.


    Lobh : means greed, a strong desire to possess what rightfully belongs to others. It makes an individual selfish and self-centered. It takes a person away from his religious and social duties. A person can become blind with greed if an effort to control the desire for unlimited possessions is not made.


    Moh : refers to the strong attachment that an individual has to worldly possessions and relationships. It blurs the perspective of a human being and makes him narrow minded. It deviates a person from his moral duties and responsibilities and leads him towards a path of sin.


    Ahankar : means false pride due to one's possessions, material wealth, intelligence or powers. It gives an individual a feeling that he is superior to others and therefore they are at a lower level than him. It leads to jealousy, feelings of enmity and restlessness amongst people. Sikhism requires that a person serves the society and community with humility. Hence, the practice of cleaning the footwear of visitors to a Gurdwara is followed by many devout Sikhs.


    VICES ACCORDING TO SIKHISM

    The five major vices according to the Sikh faith are Lust (Kam), Anger (Krodh), Greed (Lobh), Worldly attachment (Moh), and Pride (Ahankar). There are many minor vices like deceit, falsehood, backbiting, hatred, stealing, suspiciousness, profanity, vindictiveness, self-abuse through the use of intoxicants and drugs etc. but here, we shall deal only with the five major vices mentioned above.

    1. Lust

    Excessive sexual activity is harmful, physically, mentally and morally. It gives rise to many psychological problems. The common cause of divorce is adultery, which means infidelity to the marital partner. It leaves a bad impression on the children who feel insecure and neglected. Illegal sexual conduct is due to sex perversion. It produces disease, nervous tension and emotional outbursts. Guru Nanak says:

    “As borax melts gold, so do lust and anger consume the
    body.” (AG, 932)

    Moreover, lust creates feelings of guilt. Pre-marital and extramarital sex produce emotional disorders and often involve lying, revenge and crime. It washes away the benefit of many good things done earlier often at his life’s end, the lustful man feels repentant for the misery he has brought to himself and many others. For the momentary pleasure of satisfying his own passion, he aggressively tramples over the sensitivities and rights of others. Some people take a sadistic satisfaction in inflicting injury and punishment in orgies with their partners. Sometimes unnatural and beastly acts are committed by the lustful men. Homo-sexuality, lesbianism and prostitution are some of the more frequent manifestations of lustful behaviour. All these practices are forbidden to Sikhs. Immodesty in thoughts, word or deed is to be shunned.

    2. Anger

    Anger is another form of self-indiscipline. It is a spontaneous emotional reaction to insult or frustration—actual or imaginary—which leaves its mark on both the angered and the victim The Guru says:

    “An angry man frets and fumes, abuses and suffers humiliation.”
    (AG, 1288)

    Anger leads to quarrels, violence and victimisation, An angry man becomes impatient, peevish or sullen. At the time a person’s mental faculties are lost in the excitement and explosiveness of the situation. Anger may be a symbol of emotional imbalance, of conceit or of mercurial temper. The Guru preached that God is present in all, and therefore to be angry with another is to reject the God in him. Sweetness of speech and courteous conduct are recommended in Sikhism.

    A small measure of anger may be necessary for maintaning discipline or correcting one who is at fault. Righteous indiguetion for purpose of reform is excluded from the ambit of anger. Anger is the destroyer of social relations and harmony in society. Hatred and jealousy are often consequences of anger. As such, we should be vigilant and keep both our patience and composure.

    3. Greed

    Greed is the excessive love of money or possession. A greedy person grabs whatever he can whenever he can. It is not that he really needs the things, it is his excessive passion for acquisition and hoarding which makes him rapacious. Generally a greedy person is selfish, discontented, untrustworthy as he runs hither and thither to collect whatever he can. The Guru says:

    “A greedy man is like a mad dog who wanders in different
    directions;
    He devours both lawful and forbidden food.” (AG, 50)

    This quotation tells us that a greedy person’s mind is restless and excited, and that he of ten takes what is prohibited to him, this resulting in his antisocial behaviour as he misappropriates for himself that which belongs to others. Greed is a major sin; it creates an instable condition of mind and leads to inhuman behaviour. A greedy man cannot be trusted and as such his company is to be avoided.

    4. Worldly attachment

    Attachment to the fleeting and the perishable is called moh. This attachment does not only relate to wealth and possessions, but also to near and dear relatives. Man is caught in the illusion of the importance of mundane things, he feels that their possession will give him peace and joy.For example, in order to express his attachment to his family, men often do many foolish things and often get steeped in vice. The Guru says:

    “Give up attachment, for it leads to sin.” (AG, 356)

    This does not mean that one has to neglect the family or the care of one’s dependents. What is implied by attachment, is that one does not “keep some distance” or draw a line between ‘interest in the family’ and ‘deep involvement in family affairs.’ A person must discharge his responsibilities, but at the same time must also think of the things of the spirit which alone can lead to his moral development. They should realise that all things will ultimately perish and therefore attachment to them, will bring only sorrow and despair in the end.

    5. Pride

    Pride is nothing but a reflection to self-esteem and arrogance. It is Ego, writ large. It includes touchiness, superiority complex and aggressiveness. Some people are proud of learning, youth, wealth, power and charisma. Others boast of the performance of religious duties and charitable works. Pride makes’ one blind to the merits of others. It produces a false sense of one’s superiority and Often sense of jealousy and domination. The proud man is foolish and mean in his relationship with others. By his ego, he creates enemies, and also falls in the estimation of others. A man of achievement should not blow his own trumpet; he should feel humble and grateful to God for what he has attained. Pride is both socially wrong and morally undesirable. The Guru says:

    “A person who gives up pride in the company of saints is supreme; He who considers himself as low is regarded as the highest of all.”
    (AG, 266)

    Guru Tegh Bahadur warns us against the pride of one’s achievement:

    “O seers! Renounce the pride of your spirituality.” (AG, 219)

    God does not like pride. Those who are proud of their spiritual attainment are rejected in God’s Court. Humility is the passport to the Divine Mansion.
     
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