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Hinduism Sikhism and Hinduism

Discussion in 'Interfaith Dialogues' started by amitverma, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. amitverma

    amitverma
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    At times, you have heard people differentiating between Sikhism and Hinduism. I have listened this from different dharam pracharks. Is it "True". I believe it is "Not".

    Source of Sikhism is Hindusism, so we cannot separate them. It is like nail and flash. You will be surprsied that "Waheguru" word was never pronounce by any of the 10 Gurus. This is mentioned by Bhai Gurdaas in his vaars. Also in Waheguru word, va comes from Vishnu, Ha from Hari, Ga from Gobind and Ra from Ram. Do you know that Krishna name comes 10000 times in SGGS and Rama name comes 2600 times and waheguru word comes for 13 times only.

    I am not criticising anyone but we have to look at facts and our history. Read Dassam Granth (written by Guru Gobind Singh Ji). So, please do not get away with the so called dharam pracharks.
     
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  3. amitverma

    amitverma
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    Hinduism and Sikhism

    At times, you have heard people differentiating between Sikhism and Hinduism. I have listened this from different dharam pracharks. Is it "True". I believe it is "Not".

    Source of Sikhism is Hindusism, so we cannot separate them. It is like nail and flash. You will be surprsied that "Waheguru" word was never pronounce by any of the 10 Gurus. This is mentioned by Bhai Gurdaas in his vaars. Also in Waheguru word, va comes from Vishnu, Ha from Hari, Ga from Gobind and Ra from Ram. Do you know that Krishna name comes 10000 times in SGGS and Rama name comes 2600 times and waheguru word comes for 13 times only.

    I am not criticising anyone but we have to look at facts and our history. Read Dassam Granth (written by Guru Gobind Singh Ji). So, please do not get away with the so called dharam pracharks.
     
  4. hps62

    hps62
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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    Dear Brother


    SSAKAL

    The relation between these two religion is more complex than elucidited by you.

    you are right in your own way.

    But I must tell you my perceeption of the whole picture.

    I regards Punjabi hindus as mother of Sikhism , Mughal muslims as the father and British christians as the God father of Sikhs.

    The trouble is that the Mother hindu did give birth to this Brave warrior Son of hers but then it panicked about its testosterones when it started to become a man.

    It is the non warrior and cowardly decesion's of mother which has seen so many Sikhs migrating to its God father land of UK.

    The christian way of life appeals to a Sikh more than her mother womb of pseudo security.

    The day the Indian civilization shall allow its son to become a man we shall see the return of her son and we shall belong to the same family as we were before.

    with love to all

    Nanak nam chadi kala
    tere bana sarbat tha bhalla

    love

    hps62
     
  5. Amarpal

    Amarpal
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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    Dear Khalsa Ji,

    If you study the ultimate destination of all the Indian religions you will find that it is almost the same. It is true of Hindu religion and is so for Sikh religion. This does not make the two same.

    Essentially religion is path way to spirituality. The Hinduism is a path, Sikhism is also a path. Though both religions are justified in their own premise, yet the two paths are different and hence the two religions are different. I elaborate it below.

    (i) Hindu religion is based on Varnashram i.e. four castes (Bhrahmins, Kashatriyas, Vasyas and Shudras) and four stages in life (Brahamcharya, Grahastha, Sanyasa and Vanprastha) The whole religion and practices are designed based on it.
    Sikh religion does not accept this concept.

    (ii) Hindu religion does not consider all humans as born equal, women are equated with Shudras. Where as Sikh religion does not support such discrimination.

    (iii) Hindu religion consider Sanskrit as divine language which Gods understand. Sikh religion does not consider any language as divine.

    (iv) Hindu religion supports worship of idols, Sikh religion demands worship of Nirakaar.

    (v) Sikh religion demands that its followers directly worship the Absolute 'The Sat' where as Hindu religion supports worship of Gods and Godesses and trinity which by its own scripture is born and have a life span (Bhagvatam gives the age of present Brahma and also tells when this Bramha will be dissolved).

    (vi) Sikh religion is democratic and corporate in nature, where each devotee has direct access to 'The Sat', where as in Hindu religion the prayers have to be routed through the Brahman priest. To prevent from Sikhs getting into this practice Guru Sahib has abolished Priesthood.

    (vii) Hindu relion says that God will descend on earth to distroy evil. Sikh religion says that the individual and the Panth has to fight its own worldly battles. Guru Sahibs have lived the life to demonstrate this to Sikhs and have give sword to us to defend our rights.

    (viii) Hindu religion belives in Miracles, where as Sikh Gurus refused to do so.

    I can give many such differences, but to keep the post to resonable size I stop here.

    Both the religions are correct in there own premise and the period during which they evolved, but the two are not the same.

    With love and respect for all.

    Amarpal Singh
     
  6. amitverma

    amitverma
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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    Dear Amarpal Ji,

    A per you Hinduism and Sikhism are two different paths and hence the two religions are different. It is not true. Read below words of Guru Gobind Singh ji

    Ram katha jug jug atal / Sab koi bhakhat net Suragbas Raghuver kara / Sagri puri samet Jo en Katha sune aur gaave / Dukh pap tah nikat na aave ~ Guru Gobind Singh
    (The story of Ram is immortal and everyone should read it. Ram went to heaven along with the whole city. Whoever listens to or sings His story, will be free of sin and sorrow.)

    * Vedahun vidit dharma pracharyun / Gohat kalamka vishva nivaryun Sakal jagat mein Khalsa Panth gaajey / Jagey dharm Hindu sakal bhand bhajey ~ Guru Gobind Singh
    (May I preach the Vedas to the whole mankind / May I remove the blot of cow-slaughter from the whole world / May the Khalsa Panth reign supreme / Long live Hinduism and falsehood perish).

    What do you say about this?


    Read my answers below to your justifications:

    (i) Hindu religion is based on Varnashram i.e. four castes (Bhrahmins, Kashatriyas, Vasyas and Shudras) and four stages in life (Brahamcharya, Grahastha, Sanyasa and Vanprastha) The whole religion and practices are designed based on it. Sikh religion does not accept this concept.

    You as a sikh do not accept it but still practice it. You never marry your sister/brother/son/daughter to a schedule caste unless and untill you are sc. Matrimonials ads in papers/web suggests that. Am I right?

    (ii) Hindu religion does not consider all humans as born equal, women are equated with Shudras. Where as Sikh religion does not support such discrimination.

    Those days are gone but there are still hindu and sikh families who celebrate boys birth and not girls. In my opinion girls are equal to boys. How many Lady Granthis have you seen so far?

    (iii) Hindu religion consider Sanskrit as divine language which Gods understand. Sikh religion does not consider any language as divine.

    Most of the words in SGGS and Dasam Granth are in Sanskrit e.g. par braham parmeshwar, jagdish, nirankar etc. Jap, Jaap, sukhmani, kirtan, rahras are all sanskrit words. How many times namah ward comes in jaap sahib.

    (iv) Hindu religion supports worship of idols, Sikh religion demands worship of Nirakaar.

    correct, you cannot get nirankar without a guru and in hindu religion idols are medium.

    (v) Sikh religion demands that its followers directly worship the Absolute 'The Sat' where as Hindu religion supports worship of Gods and Godesses and trinity which by its own scripture is born and have a life span (Bhagvatam gives the age of present Brahma and also tells when this Bramha will be dissolved).

    As I said before, you need a guru to reach to nirankaar

    (vi) Sikh religion is democratic and corporate in nature, where each devotee has direct access to 'The Sat', where as in Hindu religion the prayers have to be routed through the Brahman priest. To prevent from Sikhs getting into this practice Guru Sahib has abolished Priesthood.

    All the ardaas is done by granthi. All paths are performed by granthi. So, what is granthi singh? nothing but a priest or pandit.

    (vii) Hindu relion says that God will descend on earth to distroy evil. Sikh religion says that the individual and the Panth has to fight its own worldly battles. Guru Sahibs have lived the life to demonstrate this to Sikhs and have give sword to us to defend our rights.

    All ten gurus are divine powers and have come to earth to destry evil. read dasam granth

    (viii) Hindu religion belives in Miracles, where as Sikh Gurus refused to do so.

    You are using miracles in a wrong way, there are lot of examples in sikh history where miracles were shown.

    Namashkar
    Amit Verma
     
  7. kds1980

    kds1980 India
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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    there are truck load of similariyies between jews ,christians,and muslims.they all beleive in prophet theory ,heaven hell .but they all are different.
    so what's a big deal if sikhs say that they are different from hindu's.sikhism is from sanatan dharam of india and if anybody say that we are not from it then he is lying.
     
  8. drkhalsa

    drkhalsa
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    Dear Friend welcome here !

    To start with I would say Sikh and hindu are brothers and so is the sikh to other religions

    SOURCE OF BOTH SIKHISM AND HINDUISM IS SAME AKALPURAKH/PAARBRAMM
    BUT HINUSIM CANNOT BE SOURCE OF ANYTHING WHETHER IT IS BHUDISM OR SIKHISM JUST AS MATAPHOR ROSE CANT BE SOURCE OF LOTUS EVEN THOUGH BOTH ARE PLANTS

    And just to mention that this discussion has been done over and again that Yes WORD RAM HAS BEEN USED SEVERAL TIMES but Ram is one of the popular word to refer god and not Mortal RAM CHANDER JI

    GOD has to called by name due to our limitaion and Ram was the coomon phrase used in the times when everybody was hindu around

    Ran chander has been specifically mentioned in Granth sahib in Bani of 9 th gur where


    Ram gayo ravan gayo ja kau bahu parvar,
    kaho Nanak thir kuch nahin supne jiyon sansar’


    I think you are missing something here

    Instead you will be surprised to know that it has been used many times by DASAM GURU IN DASAM GRANTH the Granth you are advising to read


    Also it has been mentioned in Guru granth sahib ANG/PAGE 1402 although not written by one of the ten guru ji but Sikh dont diffrentiate bani on basis of writer

    SHABD IS GURU OF SIKH and not any Individual at present .


    I Want to MENTION HERE SAID ALL THIS SIKH TOTALY RESPECT RAM CHANDER JI AS THE ISHT OF HINDU BROTHERS



    ABOUT DASAM GRANTH

    IT IS DIVIDED INTO TWO PARTS ON BASIS OF WRITING

    ONE PART IS BANI : JAAP SAHIB , AKAL USTAT AND MORE
    OTHER PART IS DISCRPTION OF GRATHS AND PREVALENT BELIEFS OF HINDUISM OF THE TIME FOR DETAILED INFORMATIOM OF SIKH ABOUT THE PREVALENT HISTORY OF RELIGION : IT INCLUDES CHOOBEES AVATAAR AND MORE



    DASAM GURU JI MADE IT CLEAR THAT HE IS DEVOTEE OF HINDU GODS HERE IS EXAMPLE
    sÍYXw ]​
    Sv;aaeya:​
    kivqw dI iek iksm[​
    A type of poetry.​
    pWie ghy jb qy qumry qb qy koaU AWK qry nhIN AwnÎo ]​
    Paan’ae gahae jabb t.e T.umrae t.abb t.ae kouoo aan’kh t.arae naheen’ aanyo​
    j`d dw quhwfy crnw dw Awsrw ilAw hY, mYN q`d qoN iksy hor dw Awsrw nhI q`ikAw[​
    Since I have taken Your refuge, I never looked to the protection of anyone else.​
    rwm rhIm purwn kurwn Anyk khYN mq eyk n mwnÎo ]
    Raam Raheem Puraan Kuraan anaek kahaen’ mat.t. aek naa maanyo
    rwm Avqwr jI, hzrq muh`md swihb, ATwrW purwn (ihMdU Drm grMQ), Aqy kurwn SrI&
    (muslmwnI Drm grMQ), Awpxy DrmW bwry bhuq kuJ dsdy hn, Br vwihgurU jI, mYnUM iek
    quhwfw Brosw hI hY[
    Avtar Rama, Prophet Mohammad, eighteen Puranas (Books of the Hindu faith),
    Kuran (Qouran – The Holy Book of Muslims), tell a lot about their faiths, but I
    have depended only on You God.
    isMimRiq swsqR byd sBY bhu Byd khYN hm eyk n jwnÎo ]​
    Sin:mr;ite Sastr; Bed sabhaae bahu bhaed kahaaen’ hamm aek naa jaanyo​
    isMimRiq (27), Swsqr (6), Aqy vyd (4), ieh swry ihMdU Drm grMQ, vwihgurU jI, quhwfy
    imlwp dy bhuq Byd dsdy hn, Br mYN isr& quhwfy au~qy hI inrBr irhw hW[​
    All the books of the Hindu faith tell so many secrets of the methods of union with
    You, but I simply kept steady in my faith only on You.​
    sRI Aispwn ik®pw qumrI kir mY n khÎo sB qoih bKwnÎo ]​
    Sr;ee Asipaan kr;ipaa T.umree Karre maae naa kahyo sabh T.ohe bakhaaneou​
    Aispwn (ikrpwn, SsqrDwrI: vwihgurU) jIau, quhwfw ieh j`s kIqw quhwfI bKiSS hI hY, mYN
    Awp quhwfy gux nhI gwey, ieh qusIN Awpy hI mYQoN khwieAw hY[​
    The Sword-Bearer: God, my praising You is due to Your blessing. On my own I
    cannot praise You, only You make me do so!




    JATINDER SINGH​
     
  9. Arvind

    Arvind
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    Amit veer,

    Rehraas sahib says:

    Mai naa ganeshey pritham manaoo
    kishan bishan kab hu na dhiyaoo
    Kaan Suney pehchaan na tinso
    liv laagi mori pag inso...

    More importantly,
    Manas ki jaat sabey eke pehchanbo

    Regards, Arvind.
     
  10. vijaydeep Singh

    vijaydeep Singh
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    Gurfateh

    Brother Amit Ji,

    Spreem Jai Shri Ram,

    As it often happens with Hindu brtheren as it happened in past with Das this misconceptiojn that bith are same.

    It is not correct that Wahiguru is not in Guru Granth Sahib JI.It is in Bhatt Swayes.
    Wahiguru Wahiguru Wahi Jio.It is about 12 times.And Bhatt themselves were part of Guru Panth.All Bani is not from ten bodies of Guru but verbal manifestaion or Sabad Guru and Bhatts and Guru spoke what Akal spoke by them.

    Again you need to read Dasham Granth carefully as it is highy anti hindu scriputre.Triya Charitars are full of making mockey of Shiva or Ram worshipper Hindus,who are told to be commiting adultary in name of demigods or deceptions.

    And Tenth Master so many time used Ek Oankar Wahiguru Ji Ki Fateh in Dasham Granth and you say that he did not use the word.

    Wa is for Vasudev is one who is living in all.
    Ha is Hari,the sustainer
    Ga for Gobind ie sustainer of Go or indris or sense
    Ra for Ram ie absorbed in all.

    Rammya is another word used.

    waht you behold as demigod are acutlay atttribute of True God Akal and your Vedas,Vedanata and even purana give testomanoy to that.

    There are mnay Muslim converts and at present mnay non Indian as they were since the time of Guru(Sipleeds in Arebia since First Master or Lamas in lesser Tibbet),they were never Hindu or ethnic indian.

    how can Ethinic indianism a sort of nationalism eqaute itself with faith or religeon.

    In fact we are real Sanatan Dharma and hinduism is an outshoot from us and will be soon absorbed back in us.



    you know what does it means.

    People say that story of Rama is eternal for ages but Rama as left to other world(what an irany).

    and you missed the next verse just after this we read daily.

    Pahi Gahe..
    As i Got your refuge(oh God),there after no one came under my eyes.Rama,Rahem,Purana,Kurana they say many views but I belive not in one.Samrit,Sashtra,Vedas say many secert but i do not know(behold then true) any.
    Lord Sabre Emblem after your mercy doing,i do not say anything bbut all describe you.

    Leaving all doors/ways went to your door.Come to your feet and keep respect oh sustainer of self as I am your slave.

    Das did not write exact Braj wording as it may hurt Hindu sentiments as Father of Das also was hurt as he is a Hindu.(Das was before reverting to True faith of Gurmat).
    This is from ugradanti and you will surprise to kknow that first tow line are not there.Rather it says that Vedas and Kuranas are already elminated.

    Then line is as follow

    Sagal Jagat Mein Panth Khalsa Gaje,Jage Dharam hindun Sagal Dhundh Bhaje

    In all world let way of Khalsa roar,Faith be awken,Hindus all mist be broken/run away.

    Same verse of Ugradanti calls for breacking of Hindu Temples also or Devals or Devlaya and calls claerly Khalsa as Third way.So read it in full.



    (
    brother the thing you need to know is that Varnas are not casate but profession and even Manu Samriti si anti race or Caste.

    But Hindu itslef is Caste.and due to pagan influnece some of Sikhs may still cling to it.But faith oppses it.Say if some Hindu say commits adultary then this may not means that say Vedas endorese it.racialism is like adultray for faith.

    (

    That does not means that faith endroese that.in fact we have good lots of Sants also in gurmat who are female.that could be you lack of knwoelge about faith.if you want you can be provided with lists of Sants in Sant Samaj and Sanatan Sikhs who are female.

    We do not support Sati(even in Triya Charitar of Pingal Devi in Dasham Granth) and Guru Granth Sahib Ji also.But you need to know that Madri ie mother of Nakul and Sahdev did commit same.Goswami tulsidas says that female are worthy to beating in Ram Charitar Manas(Das reads as animal like feamale).

    and wahy ladies who mensurate are allowed in Temples,what is wrong in that?why are they not allowed to burn dead body or say stay while pyre in burnt.In fact non of the scripture of Sanatan Dharma endore it?
    do you know how many time word Allah,Raheem or Qareem comes?

    If Sanskrit is beheld deity tingue then why Ram Charitar Manas was writan in Awadhi?Way Nath yoga and Tantirc texts could be in Ampbhransha?

    if we use Sanskrit it needs to be Guruah Grahthah but Saheeb is Arebic.

    Dashamah Granthah and not Dasham Granth Saheeb.

    thats is the mani hindu mentialty for which das left this artificial thing.


    Nothing is impossible and saying that without Guru we can not get Nirnkar is totaly false thing brother.
    how?

    Wel our Guru is Nirnakar by self and that salvage us and not any living Guru since begening.Idols are alloed in our Nirmalas or Udasen Akharaas and some of our own bow to scriputre.

    But be it idol of Guru or Avtar or scriputre but bowing to it and worshipping it may not lead to salvation but will of Akal can let us have it.Idol increses ego and may divide community say on caste lines.So it is more on social thing and still more on spritual level.
    till you say that you need to worship idol for salvation or do anything for result you will be reborn.Read Nishkam Karma Yoga in Bhagwat Gita and state of abouve Three Gunas in 14th Chapeter of the same.We as Sikh above all that.Yuo can be like us.
    Yuo said incorrect

    Our Guru is Nirnkar only never we had any Human Guru but always Sabad Guru(it never happned in Hindus).
    Agani wrong


    Granthi can be from Brahmin or Negrro ancestors,Can be from Valmiki or English background but Pandit generaly has to be Brahmin and often not allowed for non Brahmin to carry out task.

    Any Sikh can do Ardas or Path and as is not Granth but did you said Sikh can not do but in temple das was never alloeed to sit in front of idol to whom only Pandit gave offering.Path,Ardas,Kirtan,Katha all can be done by any Sikh.Better visit Gurudwara and improve your knowldge.

    But do you know that in Jaganath Puri,a non Indian convert to hinduism is still not alloed to enter levae aside cary out worship.In Darbar Sahib,we have convert from Austrliya Chris Mony Singh doing Kirtan among many other foregeners.
    It is not you fult but lack of knowlgde.

    Have you read it correcly?

    Guru says that if anyone call him(Tenth Master) as God will fall into the lake of hell.Behold him and his previous Nine form as slave of God.We are ourselv as Guru Panth behlod as God on earth and not ot wait for incarnation.

    Yuo seem to have forgot Mool Mantra of us which states God as Ajuni or never born.And all the parts of Dasham Granth are full of it.Ugradanti yuo said for Hindu relgeons relation with Panth Khalsa.

    That which is most contversial states

    Let the worship of all who are born and died/will die be destroyed.It is paryer which calls for breacking of mist call hindus and you only quoted it above without reading it all.
    Attributing Miracles to humans or demigods is Bad,Akal our God can do miracles,which can be explined by scince but in Panth miracles are more encouraged by Hindus or Muslims but Sikhs give claer picture.

    At last das requests you to be like us for sometime and see the differance between you and us.Das was like you say more then 20 years but after comiung to Panth finds the heavan and hell differnace.Till he was Hindu,he was never Sanatan Dharmi but after coming to Panth Das is True Sanatan Dharmi.
     
  11. Satyan

    Satyan
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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    How come Mughal muslims as the father and British christians as the God father of Sikhs? Ehdaa matlab ki baneyaa? Zaraa vistaar naal dasso ...
     
  12. Satyan

    Satyan
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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    plz tell me where r the lines about Vedas and Hinduism in Dasam granth jI , I am eager to read
     
  13. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    satyanji


    This link will take you to a chapter index of all the parts of Dasam Granth. If you read the paragraph under each chapter heading you can see which ones refer to Vedic or Hindu content.


    RajKaregaKhalsa.net - Sri Dasam Granth: Chapters Index

    The chapter headings are in blue and they are also links to the chapters themselves. So for example, below The chapter heading to Chandi Charitra is also a link to the actual chapter. It is underlined. The description is in green.

    Chandi Charitra (3 parts)

    The aim of these ballads (1st one has 233 verses, the 2nd has 266 verses, the 3rd has 55 verses) is to inspire warriors to stand up for truth and righteousness in the face of tyranny and oppression. On a deeper level they deal with the internal struggle to control basic animal instincts. All 3 ballads are extremely metaphorical and deeply narrative in nature, and describe the battles of Durga (also known as Chandi, Bhawani, Kalika) against many demon warlords (such as Sumbh, Nisumbh, Chandh, Mundh, Domar Lochan and Rakt Beej). Based on the tales of Durga in Markandey Puraan, these ballads also weave in the intricacies of the higher power (Akal) that controls creation, yet is also within it. The 3rd ballad, Chandi Di Vaar is also the source of the 'Ardas' (an invocation read daily by all Sikhs).

    Here is the entire granth available at rajkaregakhalsa.com and each chapter link navigates to the chapter.
    The chapters that have specifically Vedic or Hindu content are highlighted in orange font.

    Jaap Sahib
    A ballad of 199 verses that expounds the nature of the Almighty and the facets of the Almighty's greatness. The term "Jaap" itself translates to 'contemplate', and 'Sahib' refers to the Master, ie. Contemplation of the Master (Almighty). The universal appeal of this ballad makes it supreme in its expounding of the qualities of the Almighty.

    Akal Ustat
    This is the second ballad of Dasam Guru Durbar is composed of 271 verses, and is largely devotional in nature. 'Akal' translates to 'Immortal' and 'Ustat' translates to 'praise of'. The text describes the many forms of the Almighty in nature, and how mankind perceives this great entity. The nature of the ballad is inherently paradoxical. Many paradoxical questions are asked (see here for more details) and some answered. The ballad itself has been left unfinished (as the praise of the Almighty can never end).

    Bachittar Nattak
    This is the autobiographical work of Guru Gobind Singh ji that is 'the great drama', is described in great depth over 471 verses. It describes 32 years of his life, and brief episodes of other great warriors and battles. The paradoxical nature of the Almighty, the emotions of a warrior, and the greatness of truth is praised. Guru Gobind Singh ji also describes his lineage and his past lives, and why he came into being

    Chandi Charitra (3 parts)
    The aim of these ballads (1st one has 233 verses, the 2nd has 266 verses, the 3rd has 55 verses) is to inspire warriors to stand up for truth and righteousness in the face of tyranny and oppression. On a deeper level they deal with the internal struggle to control basic animal instincts. All 3 ballads are extremely metaphorical and deeply narrative in nature, and describe the battles of Durga (also known as Chandi, Bhawani, Kalika) against many demon warlords (such as Sumbh, Nisumbh, Chandh, Mundh, Domar Lochan and Rakt Beej). Based on the tales of Durga in Markandey Puraan, these ballads also weave in the intricacies of the higher power (Akal) that controls creation, yet is also within it. The 3rd ballad, Chandi Di Vaar is also the source of the 'Ardas' (an invocation read daily by all Sikhs).

    Gian Prabodh
    Another highly devotional ballad comprising 336 verses, Guru Gobind Singh ji praises the qualities of the Almighty. The text then deals with a dialogue the soul has with the King of Souls (the Almighty), where emotions, the play of various eras (Satyug, Treta, Dwapur and Kalyug) are discussed. The four facets of Dharm (righteousness) are deliberated (Bhog, Raaj, Dhaan, and Mokh). However, only Dhaan Dharam has been discussed, the other 3 facets have not, which leads many to believe this work was left unfinished.

    Chaubees Avtar
    The second largest work within Dasam Guru Durbar covering 5297 verses, it recounts the 24 incarnations of Vishnu: Machh, Kachh, Rudra, Jallandar, Bisan, Sheshmai, Arihant, Dev, Manu Raj, Dhanantar, Nar, Narayan, Mohini, Varaha, Narsingha, Baman, Parshuram, Brahma, Suraj, Chandra, Ram Krishan, Arjan, Buddha, and Nehklanki (Kalki).
    The entire chapter is very narrative and speaks Dharam always being protected by the Almighty and how this has occured through the various eras. The section covering Krishan Maharaj, Raam, and Nehklanki are the longest. Each Avtar brings with him a special technique or method of warfare to defeat the enemy he is facing.
    Much of this forms the basis for the higher martial art skills within Shastar Vidiya. The avtars can be categorised as being either:
    i) Shastardhari (using weapons and battle techniques to uphold Dharam, eg, Narsingha)
    ii) Shaastardhari (using wisdom to overcome unrighteousness, eg, Buddha)
    iii) Kalyaandhari (who change their environment through great deeds, eg, Machh)
    The ballad enforces the view that although each Avtar has great powers and carried out great deeds, they all succumbed to egotism. The 'Atma' (soul) of these great beings still derived its strength from 'Parmatma' (Highest of all Souls, ie. the Almighty). The chapter also reinforces the philosophy that none other than the Almighty Nirankar (formless) God is to be worshipped.
    Up Avtar
    Following the Chaubees Avtar are 2 ballads: Brahm Avtar (343 verses) and Rudra Avtar (498 verses). The first of these described the egotism within Brahma and how excessive vanity lead to his 7 incarnations on Earth: Balmik, Kashyap, Shukra, Brahaaspati, Vyas, Sastrodhaarak, and Kalidas.
    In the second section, the lives of 2 incarnations of Rudra (also known as Shiva) are described namely, Dattatreyaa and Parsnaath. Rudra, as his counterpart Brahma also was the victim of excessive uncontrolled ego and was banished to Earth (by taking the form of the 2 incarnations).


    Shabad Hazaarey
    Within these 10 verses, Guru Gobind Singh ji describes his philosophy and inherent beliefs of Dharam and its perception. Speaking against mindless rituals, and beliefs in many Gods (as opposed to belief in the One), the ballads narrate the greatness of the Almighty. One ballad that is added to these, known as 'Khiyaal Patshahi Dasmi' (translates to 'thoughts of the tenth Master') is said to have been written in the deep jungles of Machhiwara.

    Savaiyaa
    Similar in compostition to the Akal Ustat, the Guru describes the Khalsa (army). The Almighty is once again praised to great extent, along with the hippocrisy and vanity of self-proclaimed heads of faiths who's actions are anything but honourable.

    Khalsa Mahima
    This ballad commonly known by mainstream Sikhs as the 'Sikh National Anthem' covers 4 verses. It is said that this was narrated to Brahmin priests who had come to perform their rituals in Guru Gobind Singh ji's presence. Within this section, the Guru acknowledges vestment of the Guru-ship to the Khalsa.

    Shastar Naam Mala
    Literally translating to 'string of weapons', this is a comprehensive list of weapons used in battle and covers 1318 verses. Many names of weapons are given in addition to references of great warriors (historical and mythological) who wealded them. Many weapons that were in their infancy at the time of the Guru, such as cannons and rifles, are also mentioned.

    Zafarnaama
    Written by Guru Gobind Singh at Kangad (a village in Malwa) to the Emperor Aurangzeb, the composition covers 111 verses. Bhai Mani Singh and Bhai Daya Singh together gave this letter to the Emperor by hand. As was the custom, the Guru praises the Almighty and then proceeds to question the morality of the Emperor who ordered the slaying of the Guru's army and children under false pretence. The composition is an example of a Shaastradhari (using wisdom to combat tyranny) method of combating Adharam (unrighteousness). As the Emperor read this he was overcome with guilt and sought to make ammends with the Sikh Guru, but before this could happen, he passed away.



    There are no translations at rajkaregakhals for the sections below, but I can upload them in the next post.


    Hikaayatan
    Comprising some 757 verses, there are 11 pieces of advice given to the warriors of the Khalsa by Guru Gobind Singh. Written as if to address a mass congregation, they invoke teachings from folk tales and infuse the soul with courage and conviction.
    Charitropakhyaan ( Not available online)
    This is the largest (7555 verses) of all sections within the Dasam Guru Durbar. It is also the most controversial of all sections as modern mainstream Sikhs do not accept this as being authentic and believe it to be the work of authors other than Guru Gobind Singh ji. Literally translated, Charitropakhyan means 'wiles of women'. Roles of women (both good and bad) are highlighted in 404 chapters within this section.
    The Charitropakhyaan (also known as Treh Charittar) begin by praising Devi Bhagwati followed by tales of women taken from many texts, including, Mahabharat, Puraans, Brihaat Katha, Ayaareh Dayiash, Katha Sahityah Sagar, various Folk tales from around India and some that took place during Guru Gobind Singh ji's lifetime (eg, such as those describing the tales of Anoop Kaur).
    The tales are very narrative, informative, and reveal the depth (both good and bad) of the female psyche. A lesson in morality and rules of conduct are also given to the Kyshatriya (warrior).
     
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  14. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    Attached are the Charittropakayan in 2 parts. Translation by Pritpal Singh Bhindra.
     

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  15. spnadmin

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    Re: Hinduism and Sikhism

    Satayan,

    Here attached is the translation of the Hikayats (Hakayats). Translation by Pritpal Singh Bhindra
     

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  16. Randip Singh

    Randip Singh
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    Sikhism and Hinduism from Wikipedia:

    Hinduism and Sikhism



    Hinduism and Sikhism, both religions from India, have had a complex relationship. Sikhism is among the newer world religions, while Hinduism is often considered one of the oldest.
    There are examples of Hindu and Sikh shrines being located in close proximity, and Hindus seem to hold the Sikh Golden Temple site in high regard.[1][2]

    Hindus and Sikhism in Punjab

    Main article: Contemporary Sant Mat movements
    Hinduism in Punjab is usually held by Sants who claim to incorporate a personal and private path of spiritual development in the common tradition of mystics past and present. They discuss the irrelevance of rituals, priestly class, mandatory contributions, and compulsory gatherings of Hindus and Sikhs, they are regarded as the real Hindu/Sikh who follow teachings from both Sikhism and Hinduism. These movements are more present in Punjab. However in Sikhism, the tenth Guru stated that as a Sikh, one must not follow any other religion.
    Sikhism is traditionally seen as a religion of warriors who were protectors of those who could not defend themselves.
    In the days of Mughal oppression, which intensified in the 18th century as the Sikhs openly defied Mughal leadership both local and upward, many non-Sikhs would offer their firstborn sons to join the Khalsa Army to aid in this cause.
    History of similarities and differences

    Nanak, was born in a Hindu Khatri family. However, he declared that all are equal in the eyes of God in his famous proclamation "I am not a Hindu, nor am I a Muslim."[3] A unity between Hindus and Muslims under the teachings and revelations of the Guru. The Guru had some familiar and common beliefs as in Hindu concepts like Karma, Dharma, Reincarnation, and meditating on God's name to break the cycle of birth
    Before Guru Nanak's death, he instructed his disciple Guru Angad Dev to carry on the teachings of his religion as Guru Angad had shown selflessness, compassion and endless service and was in tuned with the teachings of his Master, Guru Nanak. Sri Chand, one of his sons, founded the Udasi order. Various orders have arisen since the beginning of Sikhism, such as the Radhasoamis and the Nirankaris. It is debatable whether these religions constitute offshoots of Sikhism or merely differing Sikh philosophies. The Khalsa, ordained by Guru Gobind Singh, is regarded by many Sikhs as being the completion of the development of the Sikh religion.
    Guru Tegh Bahadur

    In 1675 Aurangzeb caused the martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur. He had gone to Aurangzeb on behalf of Kashmiri Pandits, who requested him to plead against their forceful conversion. Aurangzeb asked Guru Tegh Bahadur to convert and had him executed after he refused to convert to Islam.[4] According to Kushwant Singh, when "Guru Tegh Bahadur was summoned to Delhi, he went as a protector of the Kashmiri Hindu community and encourage them to stand against the increasing oppression of the Mughals. He was executed in the year 1675. His son who succeeded him as Guru later described his father's martyrdom as in the cause of the humanity. Guru Tegh Bahadar undertook the supreme sacrifice for the protection of the most fundamental of human rights - the right of a person to freely practice his or her religion without interference or hindrance. This is why Guru Tegh Bahadur is also known as (Tegh Bahadur, Hind Di Chadar" (Tegh Bahadur, Protector of Hindus).
    Guru Tegh Bahadur is also honored by Hindus and the Guru Tegh Bahadur Martyrdom Day is also observed by many Hindus.[5]
    Maharaja Ranjit Singh

    Also called "Sher-e-Punjab" ("The Lion of the Punjab") (1780-1839) was a Sikh emperor and the founder of Sikh Empire.Ranjit Singh crowned himself as the ruler of Punjab and willed the Koh-i-noor back to its original location at Jagannath Temple in Orissa while on his deathbed in 1839.[citation needed]
    19th century

    The Sikh scholar Harjot Oberoi has argued that in the nineteenth century, the Singh Sabha movement, began to view the non-monolithic world view of Sikhism with suspicion and hostility, and tried to redefine a more limited Sikh identity.[3][opinion needs balancing]
    Similarities

    Here are some of the similarities between Hinduism and Sikhism:

    • At the time of the Gurus, most North Indian families would remain "Hindu" while the eldest son was a "Sikh."[6] Hindus enlisting their eldest sons in the Khalsa was done for protection against the Mughals.
    • Many Hindus visit Sikh temples.[citation needed]. For instance, the Hemkhund Sahib is a high-altitude lake in the Indian State of Uttarakhand is regarded as a pilgrimage site by the adherents of Hindus [4] and a Lakshman Temple and Sikh Gurudwaara exist close together on the banks of the same lake there.
    • When a Sikh dies, cremation is the preferred method[7]. This is the same in Hinduism, although this is a cultural similarity between many cultures.
    • Sikhs may also do the 'immersion of corpse remains' in a river after cremation, as Hindus do, although this is not a requirement; ashes may be deposited anywhere sentimental. [8]
    Mutual views

    In the Hindu and Sikh traditions, there is a distinction between religion and culture, and ethical decisions are grounded in both religious beliefs and cultural values. Both Hindu and Sikh ethics are primarily duty based. Traditional teachings deal with the duties of individuals and families to maintain a lifestyle conducive to physical, mental and spiritual health. These traditions share a culture and world view that includes ideas of karma and rebirth, collective versus individual identity, and a strong emphasis on spiritual purity.[5]
    The notion of dharma, karma, prasad, moksha and a belief in rebirth are very important for many Hindus and Sikhs as they make ethical decisions surrounding birth and death. Unlike the linear view of life taken in Abrahamic religions, for Hindus and Sikhs life, birth and death are epeated, for each person, in a continuous cycle. What a person does in each life influences the circumstances and predispositions experienced in future lives. In essence, every action or thought, whether noble or sinful, has consequences that are carried forward into the next life. When a similar situation is encountered, memories of past lives arise in the consciousness as an impulse to perform actions or think thoughts similar to the earlier ones. This impulse does not necessarily compel the person to repeat the act or thought. As proclaimed in the Guru Granth Sahib:
    Mortals obtain a human body as a result of good deeds but he reaches the gate of salvation with God's kind grace. (Guru Nanak, japji).
    Common Sikh views of Hinduism

    The references to Hindu deities in the Guru Granth Sahib are for the most part metaphorical, not literal. This is illustrated in a quote on page 1374, among others:
    Kabeer, it does make a difference, how you chant the Lord's Name, 'Raam'. This is something to consider. Everyone uses the same word for the son of Dasrath and the Wondrous Lord. Kabeer, use the word 'Raam', only to speak of the All-pervading Lord. You must make that distinction. One 'Raam' is pervading everywhere, while the other is contained only in himself. (1374)
    References to Vedas

    The Guru Granth Sahib refers to Hindu scripture frequently, not as an endorsement but often referring to their lack of scope regarding God. However, they are not explicitly denounced, either; the Granth encourages openmindedness of all belief systems:
    Do not say that the Vedas, the Bible and the Koran are false. Those who do not contemplate them are false.(1350)
    Sikhism does not have belief in Heaven/Hell system, inequality of caste and gender and held the Vedas responsible for these fallacies in the contemporary society, the quote below from second Sikh Guru mentions the same view:
    — "ਕਥਾ ਕਹਾਣੀ ਬੇਦੀ ਆਣੀ ਪਾਪੁ ਪੁੰਨੁ ਬੀਚਾਰੁ ॥ ਦੇ ਦੇ ਲੈਣਾ ਲੈ ਲੈ ਦੇਣਾ ਨਰਕਿ ਸੁਰਗਿ ਅਵਤਾਰ ॥"
    "The Vedas bring forth stories and legends, and thoughts of vice and virtue.What is given, they receive, and what is received, they give. They are reincarnated in heaven and hell"
    [6]

    • Page 463 - ਵਿਸਮਾਦੁ ਨਾਦ ਵਿਸਮਾਦੁ ਵੇਦ ॥ - Wonderful is the sound current of the Naad, wonderful is the knowledge of the Vedas.
    • Page 791 - ਬੇਦ ਪਾਠ ਮਤਿ ਪਾਪਾ ਖਾਇ ॥ - Reading the Vedas, sinful intellect is destroyed.
    • Page 941 - ਗੁਰਮੁਖਿ ਪਰਚੈ ਬੇਦ ਬੀਚਾਰੀ ॥ - The Gurmukh is pleasing to the True Guru; this is contemplation on the Vedas.
    • Page 942 - ਗੁਰਮੁਖਿ ਸਾਸਤ੍ਰ ਸਿਮ੍ਰਿਤਿ ਬੇਦ ॥ - The Gurmukh understands the Simritees, the Shaastras and the Vedas.
    • Page 1188 - ਬੇਦ ਵਖਾਣਿ ਕਹਹਿ ਇਕੁ ਕਹੀਐ ॥ - The Vedas say that we should chant the Name of the One Lord.
    In regards to their shortcomings:

    • Page 148 - ਵੇਦ ਕਹਹਿ ਵਖਿਆਣ ਅੰਤੁ ਨ ਪਾਵਣਾ ॥ - The Vedas speak and expound on the Lord, but they do not know His limits.
    • Page 355 - ਅਸਟ ਦਸੀ ਚਹੁ ਭੇਦੁ ਨ ਪਾਇਆ ॥ - The eighteen Puraanas and the four Vedas do not know His mystery.
    • Guru Nanak, on page 1021 - ਬੇਦ ਕਤੇਬੀ ਭੇਦੁ ਨ ਜਾਤਾ ॥ - Neither the Vedas (four Hindu texts) nor the four Katebas [Semitic texts: the Torah, the Zabur (Psalms), the Injil (Gospel), and the Quran] know the mystery (of the Creator of the Cosmos).[9]
    • Page 1126 - ਸਾਸਤ੍ਰ ਬੇਦ ਤ੍ਰੈ ਗੁਣ ਹੈ ਮਾਇਆ ਅੰਧੁਲਉ ਧੰਧੁ ਕਮਾਈ ॥੩॥ - The Shaastras and the Vedas keep the mortal bound to the three modes of Maya, and so he performs his deeds blindly. ||3||
    • Page 1237 - ਨਵ ਛਿਅ ਖਟ ਕਾ ਕਰੇ ਬੀਚਾਰੁ ॥ ਨਿਸਿ ਦਿਨ ਉਚਰੈ ਭਾਰ ਅਠਾਰ ॥ ਤਿਨਿ ਭੀ ਅੰਤੁ ਨ ਪਾਇਆ ਤੋਹਿ ॥ - You may study the nine grammars, the six Shaastras and the six divisions of the Vedas. You may recite the Mahaabhaarata. Even these cannot find the limits of the Lord.
    The references above to not knowing the limits of God are a reference to the Sikh perception that the existence of demigods or devas puts a limit on the absolute power of God[citation needed].
    The Guru Granth Sahib
    —Bhairao, Fifth Mehl - I do not perform Hindu worship services, nor do I offer the Muslim prayers... Guru Arjan Dev Page 1078 - Even the Vedas do not know the Guru's Glory. They narrate only a tiny bit of what is heard
    Differences

    Since Hinduism is itself an umbrella term encompassing a wide range of sects and religious philosophies, it isn't possible to list differences that would divide Sikhism from all Hindu sects taken together. From the Hindu point of view, however, Sikhism would be considered a nastika or "heterodox" sect as it does not assert the primacy of the Vedas.
    Like many bhakti saints within Hinduism, Guru Nanak, together with other elements of Sikh canon, rejected many tenets of Brahmanical Hinduism, such as:

    • Sikhism is a monotheistic religion; Sikhs believe there is only one God, who has infinite qualities and names. Hinduism is a diverse system of thought with beliefs spanning monotheism, polytheism, panentheism, pantheism, monism and atheism (see Hindu views on monotheism)
    • The Janeo (Hindu sacred thread), or 'confirmation' ritual of Hinduism.
    • The Guru Granth Sahib describes many Hindu deities like Shiva and Durga, as false illusions. Sikhs prefer not to worship in Hindu temples or go on Hindu pilgrimages.
    • The caste systemUntouchability - Hindu's believe in the caste system which is linked to ones past Karma,(in modern India, caste discrimination is outlawed)[10]. Sikhism believes ones previous lives Karma do not matter, but what does in this this life determines ones status (however, it is also acknowledged, Sikhism has not totally succeeded in breaking the caste system) [11].
    • Sikhs do not believe in going on pilgrimages or bathing at holy rivers.
    —Page 747, Line 18 - One may read all the books of the Vedas, the Simritees and the Shaastras, but they alone will not bring liberation.

    The majority accept that the two belief systems have been separate from the beginning of Sikhism. [12] Sikhs believe that the Gurus were receiving the beliefs and practices from God as the Gurus constantly stated that they were not part of the Hindu or Muslim religions. One belief in Sikhism that is commonly cited in support of this is the belief in equality between men and women, regardless of background or race.
    Sikh writers, like Khushwant Singh, have written that despite innovations, "this new community, the [Sikh] Khalsa Panth, remained an integral part of the Hindu social and religious system. It is significant that when Tegh Bahadur was summoned to Delhi, he went as a representative of the Hindus. He was executed in the year 1675. His son who succeeded him as guru later described his father’s martyrdom as in the cause of the Hindu faith, 'to preserve their caste marks and their sacred thread did he perform the supreme sacrifice'. The guru himself looked upon his community as an integral part of the Hindu social system."[13]
    Cultural differences

    Many social anthropologists have historically categorized Sikhs as a separate ethno-religious group, with its own distinct identity shaped by Mughal conflict, communalism, and a worldview including the events of 1984.[14] In the Sikh diaspora, Sikhs see themselves completely distinct from Hindus (but this is not an issue per se with Punjabi Hindus who share a cultural and ethnic bond with Punjabi Sikhs), and have an ethnic identity of 'Punjabi Sikh,' which is often their most salient identity, even for those who are first-generation immigrant.[15] Hindu-Sikh intermarriage is rare.[16]
    Foundation of Sikh Panth


    • 1478: Guru Nanak Dev stated that he wanted nothing to do with a religion that only allowed the highest classes in society to be regarded as religious.
    • 1480: Guru Nanak refused to wear Janeu (sacred thread of Hindus) at the age of eleven years.
    • 1509: Guru Nanak's Declaration "I am not a Hindu, nor am I a Muslim" Alah rām kė pind parān. ||4||
    My body and breath of life belong to Allah - to Ram, God . ||4|| .[17]

    • 1509-1539: Guru Nanak preached against idol worship. He did not attach any importance to penance and fasting.
    • 1539: The followers of Guru Nanak are called Sikhs
    • 1699: Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Guru, established the Khalsa order and the five Ks to ensure that Khalsa kept a distinct identity and were able to defend themselves in war.
    • 1873: The first Tat Khalsa Singh Sabha was founded in Amritsar. They worked towards spreading the essence of Sikh scriptures against, what they considered as attempts to subvert Sikhism from within.[18] In a short span of time the number of Singh Sabhas rose to 117 in Punjab.
    • 1879: Another Tat Khalsa Singh Sabha; popularly known as Lahore Singh Sabha.
    • 1909: Max Arthur Macauliffe published "Sikh Religion:Its Gurus, Sacred Writings, and Authors." He is widely accredited for the translation of the Guru Granth Sahib from Gurmukhi to English.
    • 1920: Shiromani Gurdwara Prabhandak Committee (SGPC) formed.
    • 1920s: Nankana Sahib, Punja Sahib, Harimandir Complex (Golden Temple), TarnTaran Sahib taken over from the mahants. The mahants had maintained the shrines since the time of the Gurus themselves.
    • 1915, 1931: New Reht Maryada compiled to replace existing Rahits after consultations with distinguished Sikh scholars.
    • 1950: Sikh Reht Maryada was approved.
    Differences between Sikhism and specific Hindu traditions

    Idol worship

    The worship of murtis (idols) is an important part of several Hindu traditions, such as Vaishnavism and Shaivism, although some Hindu denominations like Arya Samaj and Satya Mahima Dharma have rejected idol worship. Sikhs do not believe in worship of any sort of physical idol, symbol, picture, or statue. Pictures of Gurus and the book itself are not directly prayed to or revered in place of Sikhism's formless God. Pictures of Gurus are not a requirement in the Gurdwara, and they are often not even displayed in the Darbar Sahib (prayer hall), but by the eating areas and the shoe-removing areas. This shows the low level of spiritual reverence for physical representions of the Gurus, as opposed to prayer (Prayer is not a "verbal idol"). Fanning of the Guru Granth Sahib is a tradition carried over from Punjab to protect the Granth and its reader from airborne debris, as outside worship was common. Only recital of prayers and listening to hymns make up Sikh prayer. As the following quote states:
    Aad Guru Granth Sahib - page 637
    — "ਦੇਵੀ ਦੇਵਾ ਪੂਜੀਐ ਭਾਈ ਕਿਆ ਮਾਗਉ ਕਿਆ ਦੇਹਿ ॥ ਪਾਹਣੁ ਨੀਰਿ ਪਖਾਲੀਐ ਭਾਈ ਜਲ ਮਹਿ ਬੂਡਹਿ ਤੇਹਿ ॥
    O brother, you worship gods and goddesses. What can you ask of them and what can they give to you? O brother, the stones/idols you wash with water sink in water (in other words how could these stones help you cross the ocean of worldly temptations)" [9]
    Vegetarianism

    Some Hindu traditions, such as Vaishnavism, emphasize strict vegetarianism. Sikhs who follow sects and groups that have a "Vashnavite" influence (AKJ, GNNSJ, 3HO, Namdhari's etc)[19][20][21] believe that there is to be strict vegetarianism while the majority, that follow the Official Sikh Code of Conduct (Rehat Maryada[22] ) state the fact that, the only meat that is expressly forbidden for Sikhs to consume is Halal/Kosher (Kutha) meat, or the meat of animals slowly and ceremoniously killed in sacrificing rituals. Several Gurus such as Guru Hargobind Sahib and Guru Gobind Singh hunted frequently and consumed non-Halal meat. The Guru Granth Sahib states:[23]
    The Guru Granth Sahib
    First Mehl:
    The fools argue about flesh and meat, but they know nothing about meditation and spiritual wisdom.
    What is called meat, and what is called green vegetables? What leads to sin?
    It was the habit of the gods to kill the rhinoceros, and make a feast of the burnt offering.
    Those who renounce meat, and hold their noses when sitting near it, devour men at night.
    They practice hypocrisy, and make a show before other people, but they do not understand anything about meditation or spiritual wisdom.
    O Nanak, what can be said to the blind people? They cannot answer, or even understand what is said.
    They alone are blind, who act blindly. They have no eyes in their hearts.

    They are produced from the blood of their mothers and fathers, but they do not eat fish or meat.
    On the views that eating vegetation would be eating flesh, first Sikh Guru Nanak states:
    AGGS, M 1, p 1290.[24]
    First Mehl:
    ਪਾਂਡੇ ਤੂ ਜਾਣੈ ਹੀ ਨਾਹੀ ਕਿਥਹੁ ਮਾਸੁ ਉਪੰਨਾ ॥ ਤੋਇਅਹੁ ਅੰਨੁ ਕਮਾਦੁ ਕਪਾਹਾਂ ਤੋਇਅਹੁ ਤ੍ਰਿਭਵਣੁ ਗੰਨਾ ॥
    O Pandit, you do not know where did flesh originate! It is water where life originated and it is water that sustains all life. It is water that produces grains, sugarcane, cotton and all forms of life.

    On Vegetation, the Guru described it as living and experiencing pain:
    Page 143 of the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji
    — First Mehl:
    Look, and see how the sugar-cane is cut down. After cutting away its branches, its feet are bound together into bundles,
    and then, it is placed between the wooden rollers and crushed.
    What punishment is inflicted upon it! Its juice is extracted and placed in the cauldron; as it is heated, it groans and cries out.
    And then, the crushed cane is collected and burnt in the fire below.

    Nanak: come, people, and see how the sweet sugar-cane is treated!
    Page 143 Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji [25] See also


    Notes


    1. ^ In some cases Hindu and Sikh shrines are both present in the same compound for example at Sadhu Bela [1] and Katas Raj
    2. ^ [2]
    3. ^ Adi GranthPage 1136 ਏਕੁ ਗੁਸਾਈ ਅਲਹੁ ਮੇਰਾ ॥ ਹਿੰਦੂ ਤੁਰਕ ਦੁਹਾਂ ਨੇਬੇਰਾ ॥੧॥ ਰਹਾਉ ॥ I have One, who is both Gusain (Hindu Lord) and Allah, who administers both Hindus and Turks. ਨਾ ਹਮ ਹਿੰਦੂ ਨ ਮੁਸਲਮਾਨ ॥ ਅਲਹ ਰਾਮ ਕੇ ਪਿੰਡੁ ਪਰਾਨ ॥੪॥ I am neither a Hindu or Muslim, but a body made alive by Allah/Ram. ਕਹੁ ਕਬੀਰ ਇਹੁ ਕੀਆ ਵਖਾਨਾ ॥ ਗੁਰ ਪੀਰ ਮਿਲਿ ਖੁਦਿ ਖਸਮੁ ਪਛਾਨਾ ॥੫॥੩॥ Kabir has said this - meeting with Guru/Pir I have recognized the lord. W.H McLeod believes that the verse is by Kabir and not Nanak.
    4. ^ Vedalankar, Kshitish: Storm in Punjab. Word Publ., Delhi 1985 (1984). (This work contains the full text of Guru Tegh Bahadur's reply to Aurangzeb)
    5. ^ Ram Prakash: Guru Tegh Bahadur, the Patriot by Excellence. Suruchi Prakashan, Delhi 1987., and Koenraad Elst: Who is a Hindu (2001)
    6. ^ Many Hindu families brought up one of their sons as a kesadhari Sikh. Khushwant Singh and Kuldip Nayar: Tragedy of Punjab, p.20-21, quoted by V.P. Bhatia: "Secularisation of a Martyrdom", Organiser, 11-11998.
    7. ^ The Sikhism Home Page: Sikh Religious Philosophy
    8. ^ Sikh Funerals | Sikh Funerals | "Ashes are collected and scattered in running water or on the sea. Sikhs do not hold any river as holy but may deposit the ashes in a place of sentimental value."
    9. ^ a b Singh, Baldev (November, 2007), "Is Guru Nanak Hindu or Muslim?", SikhSpectrum (30)
    10. ^ Understanding Global Cultures: Metaphorical Journeys Through 28 Nations, Clusters of Nations, and Continents by Martin Jack. Gannon Page 60
    11. ^ Man's religious quest: a reader By Whitfield Foy Page 265
    12. ^ Chahal, Dr. Devindar Singh (Jan-June 2006). "Is Sikhism a Unique Religion or a Vedantic Religion". Understanding Sikhism 8 (1): 3,4,5.
    13. ^ Khushwant Singh and Bipan Chandra: Many Faces of Communalism. CRRID, Chandigarh 1985.
    14. ^ Eames, Edwin and Robby, Robert (1978). "The Wulfranian and the Punjabi Conflict, Identity and Adaptation." Anthropological Quarterly 51:207-219.
    15. ^ Gibson, Margaret A., (1988). Accommodation Without Assimilation: Sikh Immigrants in an American High School. Cornell University Press.
    16. ^ Thomas, P.: Hindu Religion Customs and Manners pub. 1960. pg. 50
    17. ^ Page 1136
    18. ^ Singh, Patwant (2000). The Sikhs. Knopf. p. 184. ISBN 0375407286.
    19. ^ Sikhs and Sikhism by I.J. Singh, Manohar, Delhi ISBN 9788173040580 Throughout Sikh history, there have been movements or subsects of Sikhism which have espoused vegetarianism. I think there is no basis for such dogma or practice in Sikhism. Certainly Sikhs do not think that a vegetarian's achievements in spirituality are easier or higher. It is surprising to see that vegetarianism is such an important facet of Hindu practice in light of the fact that animal sacrifice was a significant and much valued Hindu Vedic ritual for ages. Guru Nanak in his writings clearly rejected both sides of the arguments - on the virtues of vegetarianism or meat eating - as banal and so much nonsense, nor did he accept the idea that a cow was somehow more sacred than a horse or a chicken. He also refused to be drawn into a contention on the differences between flesh and greens, for instance. History tells us that to impart this message, Nanak cooked meat at an important Hindu festival in Kurukshetra. Having cooked it he certainly did not waste it, but probably served it to his followers and ate himself. History is quite clear that Guru Hargobind and Guru Gobind Singh were accomplished and avid hunters. The game was cooked and put to good use, to throw it away would have been an awful waste.
    20. ^ Guru Granth Sahib, An Analytical Study by Surindar Singh Kohli, Singh Bros. Amritsar ISBN 8172050607 The ideas of devotion and service in Vaishnavism have been accepted by Adi Granth, but the insistence of Vaishnavas on vegetarian diet has been rejected.
    21. ^ A History of the Sikh People by Dr. Gopal Singh, World Sikh University Press, Delhi ISBN 9788170231394 However, it is strange that now-a-days in the Community-Kitchen attached to the Sikh temples, and called the Guru's Kitchen (or, Guru-ka-langar) meat-dishes are not served at all. May be, it is on account of its being, perhaps, expensive, or not easy to keep for long. Or, perhaps the Vaishnava tradition is too strong to be shaken off.
    22. ^ Sikh Reht Maryada, The Definition of Sikh, Sikh Conduct & Conventions, Sikh Religion Living, India The Sikh Code of Conduct
    23. ^ Page 1289 Guru Granth Sahib
    24. ^ "Sri Guru Granth Sahib". Sri Granth. Sri Granth: Sri Guru Granth Sahib. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
    25. ^ "Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji". pp. 142 to 143. Sri Granth: Sri Guru Granth Sahib. Retrieved 25 November 2009.

    References


    • Shackle, Christopher; Mandair, Arvind-Pal Singh (2005). Teachings of the Sikh Gurus: Selections from the Sikh Scriptures. United Kingdom: Routledge, xiii-xiv. ISBN 0-415-26604-1.
    • Rosetta William, Sikh Gurus, Har-anand Publications PVT Ltd (India), 2002, First edition, ISBN 8124107165
    • Professor Kartar Singh, Biography of Guru Nanak, Hemkunt Press (India), 1995, Sixth edition, ISBN 81-7010-162-X
    [edit] Further reading


    • K.P. Agrawala: Adi Shrî Gurû Granth Sâhib kî Mahimâ (Hindi: “The greatness of the original sacred Guru scripture”)
    • Elst, Koenraad: Who is a Hindu?, 2001. ISBN 81-85990-74-3 [7]
    • Rajendra Singh Nirala: Ham Hindu Hain, 1989. Ham Hindu Kyon, 1990. Delhi: Voice of India.
    • E. Trumpp. Adi Granth or the Holy Scripture of the Sikhs, Munshiram Manoharlal, Delhi 1970.
    • McLeod, W.H.:(ed.) Textual Sources for the Study of Sikhism. Manchester University Press, Manchester 1984. , -: Who Is a Sikh? The Problem of Sikh Identity. Clarendon Press, Oxford 1989.
    • Harjot Oberoi, The Construction of Religious Boundaries : Culture, Identity, and Diversity in the Sikh Tradition, University Of Chicago Press 1994.
    • Rajendra Singh: Sikkha Itihâsa mein Râma Janmabhûmi.
    • Swarup, Ram: Hindu-Sikh Relationship. Voice of India, Delhi 1985. -: Whither Sikhism? Voice of India, Delhi 1991.
    • Talib, Gurbachan (1950). Muslim League Attack on Sikhs and Hindus in the Punjab 1947. India: Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee. Online 1 Online 2 Online 3 (A free copy of this book can be read from any 3 of the included "Online Sources" of this free “Online Book”)
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