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Kirpans on necklaces -- one of the 5K's?

Discussion in 'Questions and Answers' started by DharmicSeeker9393, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. DharmicSeeker9393

    DharmicSeeker9393
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    Gurfateh,

    I myself am very new to Sikhi so please excuse me if this seems like a silly question.

    But i was wondering if the small kirpan on a necklace is seen as the same as carrying a typically sized kirpan? Could a sikh opt to carry one that small around their neck at all times instead of around their waist? Does it matter how big the kirpan is according to the Guru's teachings?

    Many Blessings!
     
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  3. Kanwaljit Singh

    Kanwaljit Singh India
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    Why do you think Guru Sahib gave us the Kirpan?
     
  4. Luckysingh

    Luckysingh Canada
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    Well it wasn't to cut your apples with!!!!cheerleader
     
  5. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    ha ha and for sure it wasnt meant to be hung around the "neck"......
    i have seen "kirpans"... on the wooden comb kangha...BUT never a KANGHA on a Kirpan !!
    Neither have i seen or heard about a Karra on a comb..or on a kirpan....in fact the KARRA is the MOST WORN of all the 5 kakaars..and no oen even asks..is a tiny one enough for me...NO way..the karra got to be ..Bigger the Better..more cool..more macho..
    we have really LOST THE PLOT...if we go after such questions..and seek answers form the Guru's teachings ??? Has anyone heard the US Army issuing tiny assault rifles to be hung around the neck ??..IF so why shoudl the kirpan be hung around the neck...?? a KIRPAN is a KIRPAN....worn on a gatra around the WAIST.period.
     
  6. Luckysingh

    Luckysingh Canada
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    There is no presribed length for the kirpan as far as I know.
    You are in US, and I believe the US homeland security and federal agencies are aware and have strict protocol when searching sikhs. They have strict guidelines when conducting searches.
    In this sense I believe you don't need to worry or make changes.

    In general I do know that the rehat doesn't specify how the kirpan is to be worn, ie some wear it under clothing and some wear it over the clothing. However, it does specify that the kirpan be 'strapped'.
    Well a necklace is not the same thing.
    I do remember encountering a little episode in UK where some people that wore their kanga on their necks rather than have it tucked in to their khes were advised not to do this.
    I then remember noticing a decline in the number of kangas worn on the neck!!!

    How does this go with the kirpan ?
    I'm not too certain, but I would say if you are in a job where it may be a risk to be wearing a large one on gatra strap, ie... say a prison officer, then it is reasonable to wear a small one on the neck. (I have known a prison officer who did this, as it was a risk if inmates could grab his off the strap)

    If it is just by personal choice that you want to wear this symbolic kakkar on your necklace, - then you should honestly ask yourself why ?
    You should ask yourself does it symbolise what it means if you are doing this out of personal preference and choice, or is this what the Guru ji intended ?

    So, my real question is what's the reason to make you want to wear a small one on the necklace ?
    I think this is what you should answer so as to get the most suitable answer.

    Waheguru
     
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    #5 Luckysingh, Jun 8, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2012
  7. Ishna

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    I've heard of all the 5 Ks as charms on a necklace. Like health, wealth, faith, hope and charity or something. o_O

    Not sure how I feel about that.
     
  8. DharmicSeeker9393

    DharmicSeeker9393
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    Gurfateh,

    Thank you for the feed back Giani-ji and Luckysingh-ji.

    Actually it was purely a question of interest. As I came across an article where this Sikh woman wore it as a fashion and just wanted to know if a kirpan that small counted as an article of faith, with regard to the Rehat and/or Khalsa.

    I am much more focused right now on reading the Sri Guru Granth Sahib-ji and much less about becoming Amritdhari right now... Joining Khalsa is not something I am ready for just yet.

    Waheguru!
     
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  9. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Good for you Dharmicseeker jio..you are on the RIGHT TRACK.

    You may be surprised that born in a solid amritdharee family going back to Baba Banda Singh days..i learnt the SGGS and began doing paaths and even taking part in Akhand paaths at age 5++ and studying Gurbani menaings sikh hsitpry etc etc..I only became an amritdharee at age 55 !! - after 5 decades of doing nitnem, daily bath at 2.30 am from as back as i can remember...doing a sehaj paath each month..12 a year...each year...i decided it was time on my 55th birthday....so a LONG and sweet path is also one way...to each hsi own ji...Guur ji will do his Kirpa when its right...keep it up.
     
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  10. DharmicSeeker9393

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    Gurfateh,

    Thank you for sharing with me, Gyani-ji! That is an impressive story. It is true the Guru's Will is all that matters and will be done when its meant to be done. We can only live in Hukam...

    Waheguru!
     
  11. Archived_Member16

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    Kirpan(Sword) in Sikhism -
    A Symbol of Benevolence and Dignity

    by: Dr. Sawraj Singh, MD, FICS

    Kirpan, which can be literally translated into sword, has a much deeper meaning in the Sikh religion. It consists of two words, Kirpa and Aan. The word Kirpa means benevolence and the word Aan means dignity. Therefore Kirpan is a symbol of benevolence and dignity.

    Guru Gobind Singh made Kirpan as an integral part of the 5 k’s. The Kesh, meaning hair symbolizes devotion, asceticism, and renunciation. The hair is associated with spirituality in many other religions. But Guru Gobind Singh made Kangha (comb) also one of the five k’s, which symbolizes order and organization as well as purity and cleanliness. Karha the iron bangle around the wrist is the symbol of universality. Kachara the underwear is the symbol of piousness and sexual purity.

    It is Kirpan, which imparts uniqueness to the Sikh religion. Guru Gobind Singh in the worship of Kirpanicalls it a symbol of justice, equality and struggle against oppression and discrimination and exploitation. The Guru Hails Kirpan as the liberator and sustainer of mankind and the destroyer of the oppressors and the exploiters. He also sees Kirpan as a symbol of bravery and knowledge because it can dispel cowardice and ignorance. He sees celestial beauty in the shining Kirpan.

    The Guru asks us to worship Kirpan as one of the aspects of God. As opposed to the Judeo Semitic concept of creation, which considers the creation as a separate act of God that created the universe in 6 days, from Monday to Saturday and then rested on Sunday, the Sikh religion sees the creation as an uninterrupted and constant act. The Sikh religion believes that the creation has 3 aspects symbolized by Barhama, Vishnu and Mahesh (Shiva). Barhama symbolizes creation, Vishnu symbols sustenance and Shiva symbolizes destruction.

    Destruction is an integral part of construction because without destroying the worn out old, room cannot be created for the emerging new.

    The outlook and attitude of the Sikh religion to Kirpan is fundamentally different than the others who generally view sword as a symbol of power and domination. The sword can generate and encourage arrogance. Arrogance always leads to ignorance.Kirpan constantly reminds the Sikhs of the power of the Almighty. Therefore Kirpan should promote humility. As arrogance and ignorance like each other’s company similarly humility and knowledge go together.

    It is very important in the contemporary world that we use our power as Kirpan and not as a sword. Whereas Kirpan was used by Guru Gobind Singh to liberate the oppressed people, the sword of the colonialists was used to enslave the other people and nations.

    The judicious use of force can help us to change the outdated old world order, which has outlived its usefulness and has become redundant and irrelevant.

    The only way peace and harmony can be kept in the world and prosperity maintained is by upholding principals of equality, fairness, justice, benevolence and showing respect for other peoples beliefs and values.

    We can only suppress others temporarily until they are strong enough to fight against the oppressor. On the other hand benevolence, compassion, universal concern and universal well-being are principles which can lead to a lasting peace and progress. This is the global perspective of Guru Nanak. What we should understand is that Guru Gobind Singh raised Kirpan not only to uphold the principles of Guru Nanak but also to give a practical shape to those principles.


    Dr. Sawraj Singh is Chairman of Washington State Network for Human Rights, and Chairman of Central Washington Coalition for Social Justice.


    source: http://www.indolink.com/printArticleS.php?id=022405023333
     
  12. Luckysingh

    Luckysingh Canada
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    I know exactly what you mean. I have been wearing the same along with a small double edged sword (khanda), but I wouldn't regard it as a sustitute or even an actual kakkar as such.
    I just prefer to wear it compared to the common khanda that you see majority wearing.
     
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