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Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale

Discussion in 'Sikh Personalities' started by Admin Singh, Feb 14, 2010.

  1. Admin Singh

    Admin Singh Administrator SPNer

    123 Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale (1947-1984)

    'My mission is to administer Amrit, to explain the meanings of Gurbani and to teach Gurbani to those around me; ... and (to tell people) that a Hindu should be a firm Hindu, a Muslim should be a firm Muslim, and a Sikh should be a firm Sikh.'

    'If we speak to someone with hatred and try to assert our superiority, it will create hatred in the minds of everyone. So long as we have the spirit of love, so long as we have the support of Satguru Hargobind Sahib, the Master of Miri and Piri, is there any power on earth that can subdue us?'


    Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale was the leader of the Damdami Taksal, a Sikh religious group based in India. Sant Bhindranwale carried heavy influence among many Sikh youth in Punjab during his time at the top of Sikh religion. He spread the original values of Sikhism and persuaded people young and old to follow the original rules and tenets of the religion. In 1981, Sant Bhidranwale was arrested for his suspected involvement in the murder of Jagat Narain, the proprietor of the Hind Samachar Group. Although he willingly surrendered to police he was later released due to lack of evidence.

    Sant Bhindranwale is more notable for his involvement in Operation Bluestar in which he and other freedom fighters occupied the Akal Takht complex, including the Golden Temple, in Amritsar. For years it was maintained that he had survived the attack and was in seclusion, but many people stated that they had seen his body among the dead Martyrs. In the days before the attack he had denied the wishes of one of the later Martyrs in the skirmishes with the Police and Indian Army across Punjab, who had asked to stay and die as a Martyr in the coming battle. In the same way that the Sikhs in the Haveli at Chamkaur had 'voted' to press a reluctant Guru Gobind Singh to escape and live to fight another day, he told his friend that he had to live to fight and organize later battles, because all that had chosen to stay with him to defend the Akal Takhat and the Harmandir Sahib had taken an oath to die as Martrys in the manner of Baba Deep Singh Shaheed fighting to the last drop of their blood.

    Sant Bhindranwale was born in the village of Rode, in the Faridkot District of Punjab. His father, Joginder Singh, was a farmer and a local Sikh leader who had one daughter Manjeet Kaur and seven sons, of which Jarnail Singh was the youngest. Jarnail Singh was brought up as a strict vegetarian. His six brothers were Jagir Singh, Jagjit Singh, Jugraj Singh, Harjeet Singh, Veer Singh and Captain Harcharan Singh.

    Sant Bhindranwale took Amrit (Khande ka Pahul) at the age of five years. His early education was in goverment primary school, where he studied until the fifth grade. Bhindranwale took up farming until 1964. When in those days Sant Gurbachan Singh Bindranwale came to village Rode, where Sant Jarnail Singh joined the Damdami Taksal (Jatha Bindran), based in the village of Mehta Chownk. The Damdami Taksal is a traveling Sikh university, which originated in the times of Guru Gobind Singh. The first Jathedar (head/leader) of the Taksal was Shaheed Baba Deep Singh.

    Sant Gurbachan Singh Khalsa Bindrawale was the 12th Jathedar of the Taksal. Under his guidance, Sant Jarnail Singh began a year long course in spirtual, scriptual, theological and Sikh historical studies. A year later, Sant Jarnail Singh went back to his village and settled back to farming. In 1966 he was married to Bibi Pritam Kaur, daughter of Bhai Sucha Singh of Bilaspur. His wife bore him two sons, Ishar Singh and Inderjit Singh, in 1971 and 1975, respectively.

    Rise to Fame
    The successor to Gurbachan Singh Khalsa, Kartar Singh Khalsa, who died in a road accident on August 16, 1977, mentioned Bhidranwale as being the new leader of the Damdami Taksal. Sant Bhidranwale was formally elected at a bhog ceremony at Mehta Chowk on August 25, 1977.​
    In Punjab, Sant Bhindranwale went from village to village as a religious missionary talking with Sikhs. He asked them to live according to the rules and tenets of Sikhism. He would give long speeches and encourage numerous youths to take Amrit, the holy nectar. Bhindranwale preached to the young Sikhs who had lost their path, encouraging them to return to the path of the Khalsa by giving up vices like alcohol, tobacco, drugs, prostitution or any other addictions which would affect them mentally or physically.

    Sant Bhindranwale first participated in politics in 1979 putting up forty candidates in the SGPC elections for a total of 140 seats, of which only four were elected. A year later, he campaigned actively supporting candidates for Congress in three constituencies during the general elections, but he did not seek any political office for himself. In response to questions asked about his political ambitions he replied: "If I ever became president of the Shiromani Akali Dal or the S.G.P.C. [Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee], an M.L.A., a government minister, or a member of parliament…I shall deserve a shoe-beating from the sikh panth."

    By 1982-83 Sant Bindranwale had become so popular with the Sikhs of Punjab that the people came to him for justice, side-stepping the usual arbitrators. As stated in a 1984 Time Magazine article, Sant Bhindranwale had become so popular that he had usurped the authority of the Shiromani Akali Dal, a Punjab-based Sikh political party. Sant Bhindranwale wielded a great deal of power and the political factions in Punjab did not commit any major action without thinking about what his response might be.

    "I am her father, take what ever you want!"

    One day a young Hindu wife came to see Bhindranwale. She bowed and clutched at his feet (this is an old and honored tradition of India done to show respect to ones elders) and sobbed out her story of how she was being maltreated by her husband's family, for failing to extract more money from her parents. She also complained of her husband's unwillingness to take her side. Bhindranwale asked her name and where she lived. "So you are a daughter of the Hindus," he said. "Are you willing to become the daughter of a Sikh?" She nodded (approval). Bhindranwale sent a couple of his armed guards to fetch the girl's family. An hour later a very frightened trio consisting of the girl's husband and his parents were brought before him. "Is this girl a daughter of your household?", he demanded. They admitted she was. "She tells me that you want money from her father. I am her father." He placed a tray full of currency notes before them and told them: "take whatever you want". The three fell at his feet asking forgiveness.'

    After Independence, the Congress leaders of India forgot their promises, given to the Sikhs to secure their support in backing the partition of Punjab. These very same Congress leaders were later to adopt every conceivable posture, shranking from no stratagem to keep the Sikhs stateless and not allowing Punjabi to be recognized as an official language of India. At the time the former colonial kingdoms and Princely States were being divided along language differences. The Sikhs and Punjab were denied any special status in the Constitution Act of India.

    Death

    On June 3, 1984 Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi initiated Operation Bluestar and ordered the Indian Army to surround the Golden Temple complex to kill the militants in the complex. It was widely reported that Bhindranwale did not survive the operation and is thus regarded as a "Martyr" by Sikhs.

    According to Lieutenant General Kuldip Singh Brar, who commanded the operation, the body of Bhindranwale was identified by a number of agencies, including the police, the Intelligence Bureau and Sikh fighters in the Army's custody. Bhindranwale's brother is also reported to have identified Bhindranwale's body. Pictures of what appear to be Bhindranwale's body have been published in at least two widely circulated books, Tragedy of Punjab: Operation Bluestar and After and Amritsar: Mrs Gandhi's Last Battle. BBC correspondent Mark Tully also reported seeing Bhindranwale's body during his funeral.

    People who maintain that he survived the operation include Dilbir Singh, the Public Relations Advisor at Guru Nanak Dev University. He stated that Bhindranwale was injured on the right side of his temple. He stated, "A government doctor verified he was captured alive. He was tortured to death."

    R.K. Bajaj, a correspondent for Surya magazine, claimed to have seen a photograph of Bhindranwale in custody. This claim is strongly contested, especially by Bhindranwale's son who has now become a prominent figure within Sikh politics. Some within the Damdami Taksal claimed he is still alive. However, Jarnail Singh was pronounced a martyr by the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee at a function in 2003.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kee_jaana_mein_kaun

    kee_jaana_mein_kaun Well-Known Member

    123 Re: Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale (1947-1984)

    What most people even Sikhs dont know is that even Sant Bhindrawale was a "Brar" ie Jarnail Singh Brar but being a Khalsa he did not mention his actual surname ever.

    The last 2 paragraphs are doubtful.Any one can "write","mention","quote" anything about any so called Sikh militant or leader to tarnish his image.

    Police inspector Bajwa and Sant ji's brother Captain Harcharan Singh Rode saw his body and had the evidence of torture been there they would have known and told people.

    Fact is Sant Bhindranwale attained Martyrdom in between the 2 Nishaan Sahibs in front of Akal Takht.

    There are several eye witness accounts about what happened during Operation Bluestar .

    After dormancy of so called militancy several self styled authors came in existence .One of them being former Indian intelligence agent/official "Maloy Krishna Dhar(M.K.Dhar)" .In his book he has made all out effort to malign the Sikh militant movement to the maximum.In his book he tried unsuccessfuly to prove that a number of militants were Indian agents.Then some authors claim that Khalistan movement never existed and it was just a ploy to divide Sikhs or was the brain child of a few Sikhs living in foreign countries.All these deceptive ways to malign a genuine movement are part of intelligence agenda.Surprising thing is that most of the people including Sikhs believe what Dhar says as if he is saying the gospel truth.

    This same Dhar tried to prove that the Air India crash was the work of Sikh militants for which he and other agencies distributed thousands of dollars to the "Punjabi media" to malign the Sikhs

    YouTube- Indian Intelligence paid Thousands of Dollars to Punjabi Media

    This unrestricted and blatant misuse of media and other sources to malign the sacred Khalistan movement and the Sikhs of Punjab even today is another reason why a seperate Sikh state is neccessary .
     
  3. Randip Singh

    Randip Singh SPNer

    123 Re: Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale (1947-1984)

    Just one criticism. sikhiwiki (so long as Hari Singh is editor in chief), is a dire source for information on Sikhs. This wikipedia article (although problamatic), is more balanced.


    Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale


    Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale Born Jarnail Singh Brar
    February 12, 1947(1947-02-12)
    Rode, Faridkot, Punjab (British India) Died June 6, 1984 (aged 37)
    Akal Takht Complex, Amritsar, Punjab (India) Cause of death killed in Operation Blue Star Nationality Indian Ethnicity Punjabi (Brar) Occupation Head of Damdami Taksal Religion Sikhism Spouse(s) Bibi Pritam Kaur Children Ishar Singh and Inderjit Singh[1] Parents Joginder Singh Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale (Punjabi: ਜਰਨੈਲ ਸਿੰਘ ਭਿੰਡਰਾਂਵਾਲੇ, IPA: [dʒəɾnɛl sɪ́ŋɡ pɪ̀ɳɖɾɑnʋɑɺ̢e], born Jarnail Singh Brar[2]) (February 12, 1947 – June 6, 1984) was the controversial leader of the Damdami Taksal, a Sikh religious group based in India,[3] who supported implementation of the Anandpur Sahib Resolution.[4][5][6][7] He tried to spread his perceived values of Sikhism. In 1981, Bhindranwale was arrested for his suspected involvement in the murder of Jagat Narain, the proprietor of the Hind Samachar Group. He surrendered to police but was later released due to lack of evidence, however, Bhindranwale was kept on close watch by Indian police officials. Bhindranwale is more notable for his involvement in Operation Blue Star in which he and his supporters, most of them radicalized Sikhs who believed in Bhindranwale's objectives, occupied the Akal Takht complex, including the Golden Temple, in Amritsar.[8][9] He was killed by the Indian Army, who had orders from Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi to remove all armed militants inside the temple. Since his death, Bhindranwale has remained a controversial figure in Indian history. Some Sikhs view him as a martyr who was fighting for the interests of their community, and others[who?] see him as a militant[10] and extremist.[3]

    Contents



    • 1 Early life
    • 2 Rise to popularity
    • 3 Role in the militancy
    • 4 Sanctuary in the Golden Temple
    • 5 Death
    • 6 Legacy
    • 7 References
    • 8 External links
    Early life

    Bhindranwale was born in the village of Rode, in the Faridkot District located in the region of Malwa (Punjab). His father, Joginder Singh, was a farmer and a local Sikh leader.[1] Jarnail Singh was the seventh of eight brothers. He was brought up as a strict vegetarian.[11] In 1965, he was enrolled by his father at the Damdami Taksal, a religious school, near Moga, Punjab, then headed by Gurbachan Singh Khalsa.[1] After a one year course in Sikh studies he returned to farming again. He continued his studies under Kartar Singh, who was the new head of the Taksal. He quickly became the favourite student of Kartar Singh.[12] Kartar Singh was fatally injured in a car accident and nominated Bhindranwale as his successor, in preference to his son Amrik Singh. Amrik Singh later became close associate of Bhindranwale.[13]
    He married Pritam Kaur, daughter of Sucha Singh of Bilaspur.[1] His wife bore him two sons, Ishar and Inderjit Singh, in 1971 and 1975, respectively.[1] Pritam Kaur died of heart ailment at age 60, on September 15, 2007 in Jalandhar.[14]


    Rise to popularity

    In Punjab, Bhindranwale went from village to village as a missionary and asked people to live according to the rules and tenets of Sikhism. He preached to disaffected young Sikhs, encouraging them to return to the path of Khalsa by giving up vices like sex, drugs, alcohol and tobacco.[15] His focus on fighting for the Sikh cause made appealed to many young Sikhs. Due to his religious background[dubious – discuss] as a preacher, his followers formally called him Bhindranwale Mahapurkh, which meant "The Great Man from Bhindran". Bhindranwale became the new leader of the Damdami Taksal when Kartar Singh Khalsa, the successor to Gurbachan Singh Khalsa, who died in a road accident on August 16, 1977, nominated Bhindranwale.[1] Bhindranwale was formally elected at a bhog ceremony at Mehta Chowk on August 25, 1977.[1]
    Bhindranwale participated in some behind-the-scene political work. In 1979, Bhindranwale put up forty candidates in the SGPC elections for a total of 140 seats, he lost all seats except 4.[16] A year later, Bhindranwale campaigned actively for Congress in three constituencies' during the general elections.[17] Due to his lack of success in election politics, he later claimed he did not personally seek any political offices. As stated in a 1984 Time Magazine article, Bhindranwale's popularity reached a peak that he overthrew the authority of the Shiromani Akali Dal, a Punjab-based Sikh political party.[18] Bhindranwale wielded a great deal of power, and the political factions within Punjab could not commit any major action without considering Bhindranwale's reaction.[19]
    Bhindranwale was widely perceived to be a supporter for the creation of a proposed Sikh majority state of Khalistan. However, in a BBC interview, he stated that if the government agreed to the creation of such a state, he would not refuse. Other quotes attributed to Bhindranwale on Khalistan include "we are not in favour of Khalistan nor are we against it". Responding to the formation of Khalistan he is quoted as saying, "I don't oppose it nor do I support it. We are silent. However, one thing is definite that if this time the Queen of India does give it to us, we shall certainly take it. We won't reject it. We shall not repeat the mistake of 1947. As yet, we do not ask for it. It is Indira Gandhi's business and not mine, nor Longowal's, nor of any other of our leaders. It is Indira's business. Indira should tell us whether she wants to keep us in Hindostan or not. We like to live together, we like to live in India."[20] To which he added, "if the Indian Government invaded the Darbar Sahib complex, the foundation for an independent Sikh state will have been laid."[21] The BBC reported that he was daring law enforcement to react to his actions of fortifying the Golden Temple in order to bolster support.[22]


    Role in the militancy

    On April 13, 1978, a few Amritdhari Sikhs of Akhand Kirtani Jatha went to protest against Nirankaris. The confrontation led to the murder of thirteen members of the Akhand Kirtani Jatha and three Nirankaris. The victims were implicated. This infuriated many Sikhs further. On April 24, 1980, the leader of Nirankaris, Baba Gurbachan Singh Nirankari, was assassinated. The FIR named nearly twenty people involved in the murder, most of whom had ties to Bhindranwale.[23] Bhindranwale was subsequently implicated in ordering the assassination. A member of the Akhand Kirtani Jatha, Ranjit Singh, surrendered to committing the assassination three years later, and was sentenced to serve thirteen years at the Tihar Jail. Bhindranwale was later released due to absence of evidence.
    On September 9, 1981, Jagat Narain, the proprietor of the Hind Samachar Group, was shot dead near the Amaltas Motel.[11] Jagat Narain was a prominent opponent of Bhindranwale. He was present during the clash that occurred between Nirankaris and Akhand Kirtni Jatha Members, and stood witness at the Karnal Trial, in favour of the accused.[24] Two days after the assassination, police issued warrants for the arrest of Bhidranwale. A police search in Chando Kalan, a Haryana village, failed to produce an arrest. Upon seeing this, Bhidranwale publicly announced that he would surrender on September 20.[25] On September 20, 1981, Bhindranwale surrendered to the police at a function held in a Gurudwara Gurdarshan Parkash.[26] Over the next twenty-five days while Bhindranwale was held in custody, sporadic fights erupted in areas where Bhindranwale's accomplices had gathered. Bhindranwale was released on bail on October 15 as India's Home Minister, Giani Zail Singh announced in the Parliament that there was no evidence against Bhindrawale.[27]



    Sanctuary in the Golden Temple


    In 1982, Bhindranwale took shelter with a large group of his armed followers, in the Guru Nanak Niwas (Guest house), in the precincts of the Golden Temple.[11] On December 15, 1983, Bhindranwale, forced out of Guru Nanak Niwas by Longowal, then moved into the temple compound itself. He fortified the temple with light machine-guns and sophisticated self-loading rifles were brought in.[23] Mark Tully and Satish Jacob wrote, "All terrorists were known by name to the shopkeepers and the householders who live in the narrow alleys surrounding the Golden Temple. ...The Punjab police must have known who they were also, but they made no attempt to arrest them. By this time Bhindranwale and his men were above the law."[28]



    Death


    On June 3, 1984 Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi initiated Operation Blue Star and ordered the Indian Army to surround the Golden Temple complex to remove armed militants from the complex. Bhindranwale reportedly did not survive the operation.[29].[30].
    According to Lieutenant General Kuldip Singh Brar, who commanded the operation, the body of Bhindranwale was identified by a number of agencies, including the police, the Intelligence Bureau and militants in the Army's custody.[31] Bhindranwale's brother is also reported to have identified Bhindranwale's body.[32] Pictures of what appear to be Bhindranwale's body have been published in at least two widely circulated books, Tragedy of Punjab: Operation Bluestar and After and Amritsar: Mrs Gandhi's Last Battle. BBC correspondent Mark Tully also reported seeing Bhindranwale's body during his funeral.
    People who maintain that he survived the operation include Dilbir Singh, the Public Relations Advisor at Guru Nanak Dev University.[30] He stated that Bhindranwale was injured on the right side of his temple. He stated, "a government doctor verified he was captured alive. He was tortured to death."[33][34] R.K. Bajaj, a correspondent for Surya magazine, claimed to have seen a photograph of Bhindranwale in custody.[35] This claim is strongly contested, especially by Bhindranwale's son who has now become a prominent figure within Sikh politics. Some within the Damdami Taksal claimed he is still alive.[3][30] However, Jarnail Singh was pronounced a martyr by the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee at a function in 2003.[36]



    Legacy


    Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale was praised by many Sikhs as a martyr of common time,[37] but by other Sikhs he was considered a terrorist.[3] Famed Indian novelist Khushwant Singh stated that [Operation Blue Star] gave the movement for Khalistan its first martyr in Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale."[38] In 2003, at a function arranged by the Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee, Joginder Singh Vedanti, former jathedar of the Akal Takht made a formal declaration that Bhindranwale was a "martyr" and awarded his son, Ishar Singh, a robe of honor.[39] Harbans Singh's The Encyclopedia of Sikhism describes Bhindranwale as "a phenomenal figure of modern Sikhism."[40]
    Vir Sanghvi, one of India's leading political commentators said, "[Bhindranwale] remains a martyr in the eyes of many Sikhs. "[41] Bhindranwale is also criticised as being directly responsible for the instigation of Operation Blue Star after he intentionally turned the Akal Takht into a fortress.[42]
    Cynthia Keppley Mahmood wrote in Fighting for Faith and Nation: Dialogues With Sikh Militants that Bhindranwale never learned English but mastered Punjabi. He was adept at television, radio and press interviews.[43] Keppley further stated that "those who knew him personally uniformly report his general likability and ready humour as well his dedication to Sikhism".[43] The author further states that "Largely responsible for launching Sikh militancy, he is valorized by millitants and demonised by enemies and the accounts from the two divergent sources seem to refer to two completely different persons."[43]


    References


    1. ^ a b c d e f g Singh, Sandeep. "Saint Jarnail Singh Bhindrenwale (1947 - 1984)". Sikh-history.com. Sant Jarnail Singh ji Bhindrenwale. Retrieved 2007-03-18.
    2. ^ Singh, Sandeep. "Saint Jarnail Singh Bhindrenwale (1947 - 1984)". Sikh-history.com. Sant Jarnail Singh ji Bhindrenwale. Retrieved on 2007-03-18
    3. ^ a b c d Lamba, Puneet Singh (2004-06-06). "Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale: Five Myths". The Sikh Times. The Sikh Times - Biographies - Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale: Five Myths. Retrieved 2007-06-25.
    4. ^ "Bhindranwale firm on Anandpur move". The Hindustan Times. 1983-09-05.
    5. ^ "Bhindranwale, not for Khalistan". The Hindustan Times. 1982-11-13.
    6. ^ "Sikhs not for secession: Bhindranwale". The Tribune. 1984-02-28.
    7. ^ Joshi, Chand (1985). Bhindranwale: Myth and Reality. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House. pp. 129. ISBN 0706926943.
    8. ^ Kaur, Naunidhi (2004-06-03). "Flashbacks: Golden Temple attack". BBC News. BBC NEWS | South Asia | Flashbacks: Golden Temple attack. Retrieved 2007-03-28.
    9. ^ "India". Encyclopædia Britannica. 2008. India -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2008-07-03.
    10. ^ Urmila Phadnis, Rajat Ganguly (2001). Ethnicity and Nation-building in South Asia. SAGE. p. 97.
    11. ^ a b c Singh, Tavleen (2002-01-14). "An India Today-100 People Who Shaped India". India Today. Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale. Retrieved 2006-10-28.
    12. ^ Deol, Harnik (2000). Religion and Nationalism in India: The Case of the Punjab. Routledge. pp. 168. ISBN 041520108X.
    13. ^ Tully, Mark; Satish Jacob (1985). Amritsar: Mrs Gandhi's Last Battle. London: Jonathan Cape. pp. 54. ISBN 0-224-02328-4.
    14. ^ "Bhindranwale's widow dead". The Tribune. 2007-09-16. The Tribune, Chandigarh, India - Punjab. Retrieved 2008-03-19.
    15. ^ Kashmeri, Zuhair; Brian McAndrew (2005). "Section 3". Soft target: the real story behind the Air India disaster. James Lorimer & Company. p. 40. ISBN 1550289047.
    16. ^ Singh, Khushwant (2005). A History of the Sikhs: Volume II: 1839-2004. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 332. ISBN 0195673093.
    17. ^ Tully (1985), p177.
    18. ^ Lopez, Laura (June 1984). "India, Diamonds and the Smell of Death". Time (June 25, 1984).
    19. ^ Robin, Jeffrey (1994). What's Happening to India? (2nd ed.). New York: Holmes & Meier Publishing. pp. 146–147. ISBN 0841913501.
    20. ^ Sandhu (1999), pLVI.
    21. ^ Sandhu (1999), pLVII.
    22. ^ "Player - 1984: Troops raid Golden Temple". BBC News. 1984-06-06. BBC News Player - 1984: Troops raid Golden Temple. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
    23. ^ a b Sandhu, Ranbir S. (1997-05). "Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale - Life, Mission, and Martyrdom" (PDF). Sikh Educational and Religious Foundation. http://sikhcoalition.org/SantJarnailSingh.pdf. Retrieved 2008-03-10.
    24. ^ Jalandhri, Surjeet (1984). Bhindranwale Sant. Jalandhar: Punjab Pocket Books. pp. 25.
    25. ^ Chowla, K.S. (2003-10-18). "Tributes to a peacemaker". The Tribune. The Tribune, Chandigarh, India - Ludhiana Stories. Retrieved 2007-06-25.
    26. ^ Jalandhri, Surjeet (1984). Bhindranwale Sant. Jalandhar: Punjab Pocket Books. pp. 53.
    27. ^ Tully (1985), p69.
    28. ^ Tully and Jacob, p94.
    29. ^ Brar, K. S. (1993). Operation Blue Star: The True Story. New Delhi: UBS Publishers. pp. 114. ISBN 8185944296.
    30. ^ a b c Kaur, Naunidhi (2001-06-23). "The enigma of Bhindranwale". Frontline. The enigma of Bhindranwale. Retrieved 2007-03-17.
    31. ^ Brar, K. S. (1993). Operation Blue Star: The True Story. New Delhi: UBS Publishers. pp. 114. ISBN 8185944296.
    32. ^ Akbar, M. J. (1996). India: The Siege Within: Challenges to a Nation's Unity. New Delhi: UBS Publishers. pp. 196. ISBN 8174760768.
    33. ^ Pettigrew, Joyce (1995). The Sikhs of the Punjab: Unheard Voices of State and Guerrilla Violence. London: Zed Books. pp. 34–35. ISBN 1856493555.
    34. ^ Pettigrew (1995), p51.
    35. ^ Jaijee, Inderjit Singh (1999). Politics of Genocide: Punjab (1984-1998). New Delhi: Ajanta Publications. pp. 59. ISBN 8120204158.
    36. ^ "Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale: Unclear Legacy". The Indian Express. 2003-06-09. The Sikh Times - Biographies - Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale: Unclear Legacy. Retrieved 2007-03-27.
    37. ^ "Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale". Shaheedi Immorality. SaintSoldiers. Retrieved 2007-03-27.
    38. ^ Singh (1999), p378.
    39. ^ "Takht accepts Bhindranwale’s death". The Tribune. 2003-06-06. The Tribune, Chandigarh, India - Main News. Retrieved 2007-06-25.
    40. ^ Singh, Harbans, ed (1996). The Encyclopaedia of Sikhism. Patiala, India: Punjabi University. Vol. 2, p352. ISBN 817380530X.
    41. ^ Sandhu (1999), pXL.
    42. ^ Marty, Martin E. (1995). The Fundamentalism Project. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 596–597. ISBN 0-226-50878-1.
    43. ^ a b c Keppley, Cynthia (1997). University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 77. ISBN 0812215923.

    [edit] External links


    • Why Osama resembles Bhindranwale
    • June 6, 1984 BBC broadcast of Indian troops raiding the Golden Temple
    • From Bhindranwale to Bin Laden: The Rise of Religious Violence
    • Knights of Falsehood - by K.P.S. Gill, former D.G.P. Punjab
    • "Oh, That Other Hindu Riot of Passage - an article by Khushwant Singh
    • Videos of Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale speeches & related issues
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 14, 2010
  4. findingmyway

    findingmyway SPNer

    123 I have issues with anyone being called a sant regardless of their actions. When people like Baba Deep Singh, Bhai Mani Singh, Bhai Kanhaiya aren't called sants then why are we calling anyone else a sant! Anyone who allows themselves to be called a sant is displaying the most tremendous amount of ego as they are saying they are above others and therefore cannot be a sant as a true sant has humility. Hope that little circle makes sense!! :44:
     
    Kamala, jasbirkaleka, dalbirk and 2 others like this.
  5. spnadmin

    spnadmin SPNer

    123 It does findingmyway ji. It makes a lot of sense. The word "sant" is thrown about and curiously that same word makes for challenges, divisiveness and bitter disputes too often with regard to too many issues.
     
  6. Seeker9

    Seeker9 Cleverness is not wisdom SPNer

    123
    I couldn't have put it better myself!
    I also have issues with this particular "Sant" who I think must shoulder some of the blame, along with the government at the time, for turning sacred ground into a battlefield
     
  7. valour

    valour SPNer

    123 Re: Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale (1947-1984)

    Singh Saab,

    There WERE beyond doubt TRAITORS among us who lead to shaheedi of many Brave singhs fighting for greater cause. This lead to failure of the Movement. Along with other factors, this contributed in single most effective way to bury the struggle and dampen the support among the masses for the struggle. Why one would believe that All Singhs in the movement were equally pure. While the cause was ONE, why there were 12-14 groups ? I dont believe any misinformation about the SINGHS doing rapes and hindu murders, But it highly likely that within them, there would be internal agreement with the government. If your men have secret pacts with your opponents, how you could think of getting better of them ? Maloy Dhar has exposed various other tactics and wrong-doing of Intelligence outside Punjab. If he would tend to malign sikhs, he would be doing loyalty to his department, but in the book, he is exposing malific activites of Intelligence, then you could give him the benefit of doubt of revealing the truth. This is the bitter truth which has to be acknowledged if we wish to find the causes of the failure. Now is the time to analyse and learn from the mistakes committed.

    AIR India could be the work of the Sikhs but only of those who are in the garb of the sikhs and are working in the interests of the government.and NOT the work of the SINGHS.

    Do put in your views on this. Please take the views in the positive ways.

    Warm Regards.
     
  8. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Sawa lakh se EK larraoan SPNer

    123

    This "particular sant" as you put it WAS present ONLY in One Place..Darbar sahib Complex Amritsar...BUT over 52 other MAJOR GURDWARAS were also attacked in similar manner...notably Gurdawaras in Ludhiana, Gurdwara Dukh niwaran sahib in Patiala among them. The Army surrounded these and comitted scriliege...NOTHING was found. This is an relatively unpublicised FACT of Ops Blue Star 1984.( for obvious reasons of course ):happysingh:
     
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  9. OSingh

    OSingh SPNer

    123 I dont see a problem with the first article posted.

    In fact the second article is worse with heading

    'Role in the militancy'

    Gurmukhs from damdami taksal and akhand kirtani jatha gave their life for the panth. They fought against injustice. To the outsider they may be militants, for me bhai Fauja Singh ji and bhai Jarnail Singh ji are heroes. They made the ultimate sacrifice for the panth.


    'I also have issues with this particular "Sant" who I think must shoulder some of the blame, along with the government at the time, for turning sacred ground into a battlefield'

    This statment is totally false. As Giani Jarnail Singh ji has stated why were so many ther Gurdawaras simultaneously attacked, women raped, innocent men women and children killed if Indian Army wanted Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale. This attack was designed to wipe out Sikhi from India, this is why the Indian army shamelessy burnt Sikh Reference Library. Look at how many peaceful protests Jarnail Singh carried out, no violence, just peaceful marches highlighting the crimes of Indian Gov against the Sikhs.

    I was Indian Army that fired the first bullets. As Sant Maskeen ji said in one his katha, if Indian Army believed Drabar Sahib was such a sacred, holy, pure place then why did they bring Tanks inside Darbar Sahib. For one man, a whole army, guns and tanks.

    The reality is that bhai Mehtab Singh ji and bhai Sukha Singh ji cut off the head of Massa Ranghar inside Harmandir Saihib sahib.
    Baba Deep Singh attained shaheedi inside Darbar Sahib.
    Baba Gurbaksh Singh fought valiantly trying to protect Harmandar Sahib - http://www.sikhphilosophy.net/history-of-sikhism/1153-baba-gurbaksh-singh-ji-shaheed.html

    So were these great Gursikhs wrong for fighting at Harmandar Sahib? Of course not. Fighting against injustice is never wrong whether it be on holy land or not. It would be unholy to sit by and say nothing and do nothing.

    Recently bhai Amrik Singh, another great shaheed of the panth, son of bhai Kartar Singh Bhindranwale also was martyred alongside bhai Jarnail Singh at sri Akal Takht. His daughter gave a great interview on tv explaining the great courage of both her mother and father during operation bluestar. The way bhai Amrik Singh fought the indian army at Akal Takht is so inspiring. Both bhai Amrik Singh and bhai Jarnail Singh fought a fierce battle with indian army at Akal Takht. Only after the army bought heavy artillery to use against Akal Takht were they able to finally able to get near Akal Takht.

    I highly reccomend you watch these interviews from daughter of bhai Amrik Singh ji

    Bibi SATWANT Kaur Daughter of Shaheed Bhai Amrik Singh abt 1984: Dr. Sukpreet Udhoke 06.06.2011 - YouTube

    Remembering 1984: Interview with Bibi Satwant Kaur, Daughter of Shaheed Bhai Amrik Singh Ji - YouTube

    Great interviews, so inspiring!

    Here in UK and accross the world many youngsters started getting interested in Sikhi after hearing about bhai Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale and the role he played during operation bluestar. Many Sikhs started to keep kesh, read bani and take amrit after reading the about jeevan(life) and bravery of bhai Jarnail Singh ji Bhindranwale. Even now in Panjab and accross many Gurdwaras around the world you can find pictures of Jarnail Singh ji.

    Their legacy will continue to endure. The majority of the panth love bhai Jarnail Singh ji and he will continue to inspire many towards Sikhi. They are a perfect example of miri and piri and sant sipahi.

    Bhindranwale Sant Sipahi, Jihna Suthi Kaum Jugaee

    Waheguru ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh
     
  10. Endeep

    Endeep SPNer

    123 Though I really, and yeah truly believe what he did was right in the dead end years of his life was something that one Sikh shouldn't be forgetting about, but lately I watched a interview on which the question was rained IF Saint Bhindrawale was truly a Saint he wouldn't had resided over the Gurudwara which is a holy place also, he still decided to stay there when he was aware of the fact that it's a Holy place and one true Sikh shouldn't be taking and dealing arms inside the holy temple, would someone help me, a confused young sikh.
    Also, I wasn't born in when this happened, so please, enlighten me with the right and I'm really interested in knowing what the elders say upon this
     
  11. findingmyway

    findingmyway SPNer

    123
    No human being can be a sant. I like how the previous posts call him bhai, respectful but not reverential. That is more fitting.
     
  12. Scarlet Pimpernel

    Scarlet Pimpernel We seek him here,we sikh SPNer

    123
    Way Ji Then why is a Sikh called Sant Sipahi.
     
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  13. harry haller

    harry haller SPNer

    123 I think she means as a title rather than a description, times up............
     
  14. 123 Saint in Sikhism has a different connotation. At many places in Bani we get a reference to this term. Given below is a definition taken from another site.
    Saint
    A saint in Sikhism means a person who is a true devotee of God and spends most of his time in meditation of God. A saint's only motive is to attain salvation and become one with God.

    Link
    http://www.realsikhism.com/index.php?action=glossary


    Given below are some Tuks that would illustrate the point. If required, full shabads can be posted. However, As Ang/Page numbers are given one may kindly like to refer to the page numbers.

    Ambarsari ji has also covered this aspect in one of his posts.

    ਰਾਮ ਸੰਤ ਮਹਿ ਭੇਦੁ ਕਿਛੁ ਨਾਹੀ ਏਕੁ ਜਨੁ ਕਈ ਮਹਿ ਲਾਖ ਕਰੋਰੀ

    रामसंतमहिभेदुकिछुनाहीएकुजनुकईमहिलाखकरोरी
    Rām sanṯ mėh bẖeḏ kicẖẖ nāhī ek jan ka▫ī mėh lākẖ karorī.
    Between the Lord and His Saint, there is no difference at all. Among hundreds of thousands and millions, there is scarcely one humble being. [Ang 208]

    ਹਰਿ ਸੰਤਨ ਕਰਿ ਨਮੋ ਨਮੋ
    हरिसंतनकरिनमोनमो
    Har sanṯan kar namo namo.
    Greet the Lord's Saints humbly, with deep respect.
    ਨਉ ਨਿਧਿ ਪਾਵਹਿ ਅਤੁਲੁ ਸੁਖੋ ੪॥
    नउनिधिपावहिअतुलुसुखो॥४॥
    Na▫o niḏẖ pāvahi aṯul sukẖo. ||4||
    You shall obtain the nine treasures, and receive infinite peace.
    [Ang 241]


    ਸਲੋਕੁ
    सलोकु
    Salok.
    Shalok:
    ਸੰਤ ਸਰਨਿ ਜੋ ਜਨੁ ਪਰੈ ਸੋ ਜਨੁ ਉਧਰਨਹਾਰ
    संतसरनिजोजनुपरैसोजनुउधरनहार
    Sanṯ saran jo jan parai so jan uḏẖranhār.
    One who seeks the Sanctuary of the Saints shall be saved.
    ਸੰਤ ਕੀ ਨਿੰਦਾ ਨਾਨਕਾ ਬਹੁਰਿ ਬਹੁਰਿ ਅਵਤਾਰ ੧॥
    संतकीनिंदानानकाबहुरिबहुरिअवतार॥१॥
    Sanṯ kī ninḏā nānkā bahur bahur avṯār. ||1||
    One who slanders the Saints, O Guru Nanak, shall be reincarnated over and over again.
    [Ang 279-Sukhmani sahib]

    I think it is for this reason that findingmyway ji might have referred to.There are other important references that state the above point.Please follow the link for further study.

    http://www.sikhs.org/saints.htm


     
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  15. Ambarsaria

    Ambarsaria ੴ / Ik▫oaʼnkār SPNer

    123 We should perhaps also note that Sant is in common usage is also a reference to "One Pure of Heart".

    My mother says of pure hearted people,

    Sat Sri Akal.
     
  16. findingmyway

    findingmyway SPNer

    123
    However, when someone thinks they are themself pure hearted or noble and need no further improvement-to me that indicates an ego which is no longer compatible with being a sant. A true sant is humble and non-judgemental. A true sant is helping others and always aiming to imrpove themselves too.
     
  17. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Sawa lakh se EK larraoan SPNer

    123 PLease Note: a SANT-SIPAHI is NOT the Same as "Sant" or "Sipahi".....99.99% of the so called "Sants" in round turbans, huge bellies and huger cholas gallivanting around the globe from DERA to DERA..are NOT "SANT-SIPAHI"....and according to gurmatt a Sikh must be a Saant-Sipahi....a person like Baba banda Singh bahadur..baba deep Singh, Baba Mani singh etc
     
  18. BaljinderS

    BaljinderS SPNer

    123 Let get one thing straight here... Jarnail Singh Bhindrawale, never, i mean never, said to anyone that he should be called a "saint".

    Not like the pakhandies now... who would go to the other side of the universe to avoid death.

    I am really confused why even think of putting a "sorbeer yodha" in the same category of the self styled "lachar pachar" donkies who have no self respect, let alone respecting their followers and teaching them the way of Sikhi.

    As Jarnail Singh veer ji said, why were there so many innocent women,children helpless killed????! Was Jarnail Singh using them as human shield or was there other reasons??

    Real Sikhs who live a truthful living are not afraid of death, they are always ready to give their head. The pakhandi Sikhs who spit on the shaheeds of died for the truth are the low of the low.

    We should learn to respect our shaheeds. They have endured everything unimaginable to serve the panth. Just imagine, if your wife,brother,father,mother was taken away without any reason and humilated, tortured...?? Just think about this.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2012
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