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Nature How Gujarat Government Tackled Water Shortage

Discussion in 'Breaking News' started by kds1980, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. kds1980

    kds1980 India
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    In 1999, the state government began an initiative that has fuelled a lot of this change: It began to build check dams on rivers flowing through Gujarat. “A check dam is a small barrier built across the direction of water flow on shallow rivers and streams to harvest water,” explains Raval. These structures capture excess water during the monsoon in a small catchment area behind them and force the impounded water to seep into the ground, he says.

    The initiative that began about 10 years ago gained currency in the Modi administration, when about 35,000 check dams were constructed in Saurashtra and about 100,000 in the rest of the state. In addition, about 130,000 farm ponds were created and a huge sandbag initiative was undertaken to stop soil erosion and salination.

    As a result of the multi-pronged strategy, groundwater levels began to rise quickly, says Rajubhai Ashoter, a farmer near Amreli. “Earlier we used to get water at 400, sometimes 500ft underground. Now, we get it at 80-90ft.”

    A survey of the region by the Geological Survey of India has found that the average water table has risen by about 4m in Saurashtra, says Raval. “And as a result, agricultural production has undergone a huge transformation.”

    Farmers say they are now able to grow three crops in a year. “Earlier we used to be happy if we could get a winter crop after the monsoon produce. Now, I grow something or the other in the summer as well. We used to have drought for seven years out of 10. Now, see this,” says Ashoter, looking at his field where he has planted a winter crop of Bt (or genetically modified) cotton and wheat.

    “The average area under cultivation has gone up by about 10,00,000ha on an average,” says Raval. “The agricultural sales policy has been streamlined as well, so of course the farmers are prospering now.”
     
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  3. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    And this is what the Punjab Govt has done...or has NOT done...
    From an Email posted by the ANZ-SIKHS Forum Admin....

    Gurfateh,

    Please be aware of these resources in your court battles for Punjab river and ground waters. Facts and figures are important in law courts. Pritam Singh Kumedan is the only water expert of Punjab trusted by Badal. He has no written documentation by the looks of it. About 5 years back his journalist daughter married a Gujarati IAS officer. Badal/Dhindsa etc were in attendance.


    Problem started before partition when British dug canals starting 1880 and also one in 1920 to take water to Rajasthan. And then to riyasats of Jind in Western Haryana. Currently all of Western Haryana and Southern Punjab districts are irrigated with canal water.

    There is discrimination rife within Punjab as well as districts of Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Hoshiarpur, Sangrur, Patiala are not given their due share of canal waters in comparision to southern districts. As a result all these districts were total land area irrigated by canal water is less then 5% are having falling groundwater levels. While southern Punjab districts are 95% canal fed.

    Anyway go through the data. It could take upto couple of days to read the information.



    [​IMG]When Kumedan speaks, Badal and Amarinder listen
    Chandigarh, September 26
    Neither does he run any consultancy firm, nor has he set up any institute of so-called scholars to offer readymade solutions to various issues, problems etc. He also does not hold any high-grade academic degree to flaunt. But even then he is the most sought-after man in top political and apolitical circles. What he says is taken seriously by all concerned.
    Pritam Singh Kumedan






    International Laws.
    -- United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) - Error page --
    Vital Water Graphics - United Nations Environment Programme
    -- United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) - Error page --
    -- United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) - Error page --
    International Water Law Project | Home

    Indian waters.
    Ministry of Water Resources
    South Asia - Indus Waters Treaty
    http://wrmin.nic.in/riverbasin/river.htm


    http://www.waterandfood.org/gga/Lecture Material/SDharmadhikary_Bhakra.pdf
    http://www.manthan-india.org/IMG/pdf/Unravelling_Bhakra_Part_1.pdf
    http://www.manthan-india.org/IMG/pdf/Unravelling_Bhakra_Part_2.pdf
    http://www.manthan-india.org/IMG/pdf/Unravelling_Bhakra_Part_3.pdf


    Regards

    Amandeep Singh


    Rajasthan ‘owes Rs 80,000 cr’ to Punjab
    Prabhjot Singh
    Tribune News Service
    Chandigarh, November 2
    Punjab incurred an expenditure of Rs 80,000 crore while supplying one crore acre feet of free canal water to Rajasthan besides depleting its own resources continuously for 40 years now, says Pritam Singh Kumedan, a retired civil servant and expert on rivers water distribution.

    Besides the huge expenditure in supplying free water to Rajasthan, he says, the state has to extract this much extra ground water for its own use, affecting the fertility of its land.
    There are more than 13 lakh power and diesel-operated tube wells in Punjab that pump out about 2.50 crore acre feet of water every year. The electricity consumed by these tube wells annually is more than 1,000 crore units. The value of this electricity at Rs 2.50 per unit comes to about Rs 2,600 crore.
    However, since Punjab purchases electricity from other states for Rs 7 to Rs 8 per unit, power used to energise these tube wells costs more than Rs 7,000 crore. Diesel-operated tube wells cost four to five times more.
    Owing to the shortage of electricity many farmers use generators as well. Even if the cost of power were taken to be Rs 5 per unit, 1,000 crore units of electricity would cost Rs 5,000 crore.
    Since Punjab is supplying one crore acre feet of canal water to Rajasthan every year, it has to use 400 crore units of electricity worth Rs 2,000 crore for extracting this much ground water.
    The total amount spent by Punjab for pumping out 40 crore acre feet of water during the past 40 years would thus come to Rs 80,000 crore.
    Had Punjab used its river waters, there was no need to extract this much ground water.
    This annual loss of 400 crore units of electricity is all due to free canal water to Rajasthan.
    Punjab would have become the top-most industrial state of the country if it had used this additional 400 crore units of electricity (free of subsidies) for its industry, says Kumedan.
    He adds that a decision taken on January 29, 1955, to build the Rajasthan canal could not be treated as an “agreement” between Punjab and Rajasthan. Incidentally, the proceedings are marked “secret” and intriguingly even the present Punjab Council of Ministers, the media and even the people of Punjab were not aware of it.
    Rajasthan, being a non-riparian state, has no legal right or any share of the waters of the Ravi or the Beas.
    It was decided by the Narmada Water Dispute Tribunal that non-riparian Rajasthan had no right even in the Narmada waters.
    Even if, for the sake of argument, decisions of the 1955 meeting were admitted to be an “agreement”, it is a void agreement as Punjab, being the sole owner of the waters of the Ravi and the Beas, did not get anything in lieu of the water supplied to Rajasthan. Section 25 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872, says an “agreement without consideration is void”, concludes Kumedan.cheerleader
     
  4. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Sawa lakh se EK larraoan
    Mentor Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
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    And this is what the Punjab Govt has done...or has NOT done...
    From an Email posted by the ANZ-SIKHS Forum Admin....

    Gurfateh,

    Please be aware of these resources in your court battles for Punjab river and ground waters. Facts and figures are important in law courts. Pritam Singh Kumedan is the only water expert of Punjab trusted by Badal. He has no written documentation by the looks of it. About 5 years back his journalist daughter married a Gujarati IAS officer. Badal/Dhindsa etc were in attendance.


    Problem started before partition when British dug canals starting 1880 and also one in 1920 to take water to Rajasthan. And then to riyasats of Jind in Western Haryana. Currently all of Western Haryana and Southern Punjab districts are irrigated with canal water.

    There is discrimination rife within Punjab as well as districts of Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Hoshiarpur, Sangrur, Patiala are not given their due share of canal waters in comparision to southern districts. As a result all these districts were total land area irrigated by canal water is less then 5% are having falling groundwater levels. While southern Punjab districts are 95% canal fed.

    Anyway go through the data. It could take upto couple of days to read the information.



    [​IMG]When Kumedan speaks, Badal and Amarinder listen
    Chandigarh, September 26
    Neither does he run any consultancy firm, nor has he set up any institute of so-called scholars to offer readymade solutions to various issues, problems etc. He also does not hold any high-grade academic degree to flaunt. But even then he is the most sought-after man in top political and apolitical circles. What he says is taken seriously by all concerned.
    Pritam Singh Kumedan






    International Laws.
    -- United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) - Error page --
    Vital Water Graphics - United Nations Environment Programme
    -- United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) - Error page --
    -- United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) - Error page --
    International Water Law Project | Home

    Indian waters.
    Ministry of Water Resources
    South Asia - Indus Waters Treaty
    http://wrmin.nic.in/riverbasin/river.htm


    http://www.waterandfood.org/gga/Lecture Material/SDharmadhikary_Bhakra.pdf
    http://www.manthan-india.org/IMG/pdf/Unravelling_Bhakra_Part_1.pdf
    http://www.manthan-india.org/IMG/pdf/Unravelling_Bhakra_Part_2.pdf
    http://www.manthan-india.org/IMG/pdf/Unravelling_Bhakra_Part_3.pdf


    Regards

    Amandeep Singh


    Rajasthan ‘owes Rs 80,000 cr’ to Punjab
    Prabhjot Singh
    Tribune News Service
    Chandigarh, November 2
    Punjab incurred an expenditure of Rs 80,000 crore while supplying one crore acre feet of free canal water to Rajasthan besides depleting its own resources continuously for 40 years now, says Pritam Singh Kumedan, a retired civil servant and expert on rivers water distribution.

    Besides the huge expenditure in supplying free water to Rajasthan, he says, the state has to extract this much extra ground water for its own use, affecting the fertility of its land.
    There are more than 13 lakh power and diesel-operated tube wells in Punjab that pump out about 2.50 crore acre feet of water every year. The electricity consumed by these tube wells annually is more than 1,000 crore units. The value of this electricity at Rs 2.50 per unit comes to about Rs 2,600 crore.
    However, since Punjab purchases electricity from other states for Rs 7 to Rs 8 per unit, power used to energise these tube wells costs more than Rs 7,000 crore. Diesel-operated tube wells cost four to five times more.
    Owing to the shortage of electricity many farmers use generators as well. Even if the cost of power were taken to be Rs 5 per unit, 1,000 crore units of electricity would cost Rs 5,000 crore.
    Since Punjab is supplying one crore acre feet of canal water to Rajasthan every year, it has to use 400 crore units of electricity worth Rs 2,000 crore for extracting this much ground water.
    The total amount spent by Punjab for pumping out 40 crore acre feet of water during the past 40 years would thus come to Rs 80,000 crore.
    Had Punjab used its river waters, there was no need to extract this much ground water.
    This annual loss of 400 crore units of electricity is all due to free canal water to Rajasthan.
    Punjab would have become the top-most industrial state of the country if it had used this additional 400 crore units of electricity (free of subsidies) for its industry, says Kumedan.
    He adds that a decision taken on January 29, 1955, to build the Rajasthan canal could not be treated as an “agreement” between Punjab and Rajasthan. Incidentally, the proceedings are marked “secret” and intriguingly even the present Punjab Council of Ministers, the media and even the people of Punjab were not aware of it.
    Rajasthan, being a non-riparian state, has no legal right or any share of the waters of the Ravi or the Beas.
    It was decided by the Narmada Water Dispute Tribunal that non-riparian Rajasthan had no right even in the Narmada waters.
    Even if, for the sake of argument, decisions of the 1955 meeting were admitted to be an “agreement”, it is a void agreement as Punjab, being the sole owner of the waters of the Ravi and the Beas, did not get anything in lieu of the water supplied to Rajasthan. Section 25 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872, says an “agreement without consideration is void”, concludes Kumedan.cheerleader
     
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