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Excommunication of a Sikh?

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by Archived_Member16, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. Archived_Member16

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    Is the excommunication of a Sikh authorized by Gurbani, Sikh Raht Maryada (it mentions a Sikh being declared tankhaiya , i.e. leading to social boycott), Sikh tradition or by the Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee Act ?

    SIKH REHT MARYADA states in Section SIX, Chapter XIII, Article XXV - Method of Imposing Chastisement (Tankah):

    Article XXV

    a. Any Sikh who has committed any default in the observance of the Sikh discipline should approach the nearby Sikh congregation and make a confession of his lapse standing before the congregation.
    b. The congregation should then, in the holy presence of Guru Granth Sahib, elect from among themselves five beloved ones who should ponder over the suppliant's fault and propose the chastisement (punishment) for it.
    c. The congregation should not take an obdurate stand in granting pardon. Nor should the defaulter argue about the chastisement. The punishment that is imposed should be some kind of service, especially some service that can be performed with hands.
    d. And finally an Ardas for correction should be performed

    source: Sikh Reht Maryada, The Definition of Sikh, Sikh Conduct & Conventions, Sikh Religion Living, India
     
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  3. vsgrewal48895

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Dear All,

    IMHO it is nothing but institutionalizing the faith to control the followers by those who are in power with political corruption and spiritual ignorance. Guru Nanak pondered over it in Raag Ramkali;

    ਕਾਜੀ ਹੋਇ ਕੈ ਬਹੈ ਨਿਆਇ ॥ ਫੇਰੇ ਤਸਬੀ ਕਰੇ ਖੁਦਾਇ ॥ ਵਢੀ ਲੈ ਕੈ ਹਕੁ ਗਵਾਏ ॥ ਜੇ ਕੋ ਪੁਛੈ ਤਾ ਪੜਿ ਸੁਣਾਏ ॥

    Kājī ho­ė kai bahai ni­ā­ė. Fėrė ṯasbī karė kẖuḏā­ė. vadẖī lai kai hak gavā­ė. Jė ko pucẖẖai ṯā paṛ suṇā­ė.

    Becoming judges, they sit and administer justice. They chant on their rosaries, and call upon God. They accept bribes, and block justice. If someone asks them, they read quotations from their books. -----Guru Nanak, Raag Ramkali, AGGS, Page, 951-15

    Political corruption is a socio-political and moral pathology feeding on bribery, despair, human suffering, apathy, and spiritual ignorance. It has much the same effect on the development of a nation that cancer has on the life of a biological organism. Large-scale corruption is supported by power networks. Large-scale corruption is an emergent social process. The same governing factors that sustain large-scale corruption are in direct opposition to efforts to promote development. While extracting wealth, corrupt power networks generated waste, reduced production, and caused acrimony on the part of the victims. In the final analysis corruption is a tree, whose branches are of an immeasurable length spreading every where and the dew that drops from them has infected chairs and stools of authority.

    Conclusion;

    ਪੜਹਿ ਮਨਮੁਖ ਪਰੁ ਬਿਧਿ ਨਹੀ ਜਾਨਾ ॥ ਨਾਮੁ ਨ ਬੂਝਹਿ ਭਰਮਿ ਭੁਲਾਨਾ ॥ ਲੈ ਕੈ ਵਢੀ ਦੇਨਿ ਉਗਾਹੀ ਦੁਰਮਤਿ ਕਾ ਗਲਿ ਫਾਹਾ ਹੇ ॥

    Paṛeh manmukẖ par biḏẖ nahī jānā. Nām na būjẖeh bẖaram bẖulānā. Lai kai vadẖī ḏėn ugāhī ḏurmaṯ kā gal fāhā hė.

    The self-willed read and study, but they do not know the way. They do not understand the Name of the Akal Purkh; they wander, deluded by doubt. They take bribes, and give false testimony; the noose of evil-mindedness is around their necks. -----Guru Nanak, Raag Maru, AGGS, Page, 1032-11

    Cordially,

    Virinder S Grewal
     
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  4. japjisahib04

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    The protocol and Maryada demands that there should be some accountability and a show cause notice be issued to those who have undertaken an oath and have amrit chhak and violated their oath in public, so that decipline be maintained.

    Mohinder Singh Sahni
     
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  5. vsgrewal48895

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Dear Mohinder Ji,

    I agree with your comments and add that there should be tranparency in the system and there should be no closed door decisions and not as Guru Nanak refered to the red book of Qazi where they make their own rules.

    Cordially,

    Virinder
     
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  6. Kuls1980

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Mohinder Singh Ji,

    A question, if you have broken your Amrit should you be Excommunicated from the Sikh faith?
     
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  7. Tejwant Singh

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Sadh Sangat,

    Guru Fateh.

    1.Does anyone know the origin of Tankhiya and when and how did it start?

    2. Who was the first one in Sikhi to get this punishment?

    3.Where does it say in SGGS about this or is it copied from the Catholic " confession"?

    4. What authourity do the 5 Pyaras possess, based on what Gurmat ideals?

    5. What if one or more out of 5 have done the same or the similar thing and have not told anyone?

    6. Who is making sure that 5 Pyaras are capable of giving punishment because taking Khandei de pahul is not suffice?

    7. What happens if the decision to punish is taken out of sheer ego ( anti Gurmat ideal) rather than based on Gurmat ideals?

    8. Who is the ultimate authourity?

    Just thinking aloud!

    Tejwant Singh
     
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  8. spnadmin

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Excommunication
    Charnjit Singh Bal
    Ever since the origin of the institutionalized religion there has always been inimicality between the dogmatic orthodox and the pragmatic progressive elements. The bone of contention has essentially been the interpretation of the religious concepts, doctrines and practice. Whereas the orthodox element tends to be inclined towards occultism, the progressive element tends to be realism oriented. Often the former element’s zeal to foster its dogmatic version of religious concepts, doctrines, dicta and practice has resulted in protracted strife in which the orthodoxy’s detractors are persecuted. To accomplish its objectives, the ultra-orthodox religious clique often resorts to unholy means such as branding the opponents as heretics or blasphemous and excommunicated, ostracized and/or burnt them alive at the stake.

    During the primeval and medieval times since illiteracy and spiritual un-awareness were more prevalent among the religious flocks, it was lot easier for the holy demagogues to foster their occult version i.e. blind faith devotion, prejudices, taboos and superstitions upon the innocent/ignorant people. There were fewer learned and rational minded people who had the gumption to question the authoritarian orthodoxy’s dogmatic rigmarole of myths, heaven/hell, sin/penitence, sacrifices, idolatry and donations/offerings to the self-anointed holy men of dubious credentials.

    Since superstitions, myths, stigmas, taboos and prejudices play a vital part in influencing the mentality of the gullible religious flocks, astute ecclesiastics invariably include these occult elements in their religious dogmas. Because of the religious flocks’ gullibility the dogmatic orthodoxy has always been in control of the seats of power of the religious institutions. In the annals of human history there have been instances of orthodox ecclesiastics of every religion persecuting rational minded people who had the spiritual awareness and strength of their convictions to challenge formers' mystifying dogmas and occult religiosity.

    Additional and controversial ideas from this article continued at this link http://www.sikhsundesh.net/excommunication.htm
     
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  9. spnadmin

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Tejwant ji

    In response to your question regarding the first excommunication - which is a poor equivalent for Tankhaiya, this may explain. But it is sure as well to be debatable.

    In 1661, his eldest son and celebrated scholar Ram Rai (son of Guru Har Rai Sahib) was sent to the court of Emperor Aurangzeb for rendering explanation of certain hymns misunderstood by the Mughal Durbar. Instead of doing justice to the theme as contained in a Shabad, he avoided facing a debate and replaced while quoting from Guru Granth Sahib only one word. When Guru Har Rai Sahib learnt about this, he asked his son not to show his face and also instructed the Sikhs not to have any worldly terms with him and his people.


    Here is the source article: WSN-Special Report-Unchallengeable Authenticity of Guru Granth Sahib

    Some of the information in the article is subject to question (e.g., the excommunication of Rosana Spokesman, Chief Editor, Jogendar Singh) as there may be overstatements. Tankhaiya is not exactly excommunication and is more like banning.
     
  10. vsgrewal48895

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Dear Narayanjot Ji,

    I have a simple question on the subject.

    How excommunication does affect a Sikh with out 5 K's e.g. me? I am old, retired, and controversial to some, have Gurudwara in my home, have Sikh and other friends for social purposes and have no inclination to go to India?

    Should I be excommunicated what will be my status on SPN forum?

    Does SPN forum falls under the control of Akal Takhat?

    Cordially,

    Virinder
     
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  11. spnadmin

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Virinder ji

    Any response I would give you would be my own opinion which is fallible. I think that the obvious and common sense answer is that you have little to fear in that regard. Here a some reasons for my opinion: a) Akal Takht is one of several Takhts and its jurisdiction is not comprehensive; b) The SPN forum does not to my knowledge fall under the jurisdiction of Akal Takht; c) You would be called in India in the event of proceedings so I don't know how they would catch up with you, assuming they were interested in doing so. That is about all I can offer. I often wonder myself where I stand with Akal Takht.
     
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  12. Tejwant Singh

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Narayanjot ji,

    Guru Fateh.

    We talked about the above Sakhi in one of the other threads about Potter meaning Allah in Islam and I also mentioned that I do not believe that the above Sakhi ever took place and gave my reasons for that.

    So, the above episode is irrelevant as far as Tankhah is concerned.

    Tejwant Singh
     
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  13. vsgrewal48895

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Dear All,

    AKAL TAKHAT
    Copied from encyclopedia of Sikhism

    AKAL TAKHT is the primary seat of Sikh religious authority and central altar for Sikh political assembly. Through hukamnamas, edicts or writs, it may issue decretals providing guidance or clarification on any point of Sikh doctrine or practice referred to it, may lay under penance personages charged with violation of religious discipline or with activity prejudicial to Sikh interests or solidarity and may place on record its appreciation of outstanding services rendered or sacrifices made by individuals espousing the case of Sikhism or of the Sikhs. The edifice stands in the Darbar Sahib precincts in Amritsar facing Harimandar, now famous as the Golden Temple. The word akal, a negative of kal (time), is the equivalent of timeless, beyond time, everlasting, and takht, in Persian, that of royal throne or chair of state. Akal Takht would thus mean "timeless or everlasting throne" or "throne of the Timeless One, i. e. God.” In the Sikh system, God is postulated as Formless (Nirankar), yet to proclaim His sovereignty over His creation, He is sometimes referred to as sultan, patsah, sacha sah, or the True King; His seat is referred to as sachcha takht, the True Throne, sitting on which He dispenses sachcha niao, true justice (GG, 84, 1087). It also became common for Sikhs, at least by the time of Guru Arjan (1563-1606), to refer to the Guru as sachcha patshah and to his gaddi or spiritual seat as takht and the congregation he led as darbar or court. Panegyrizing the Gurus, the bards Balvand, Nalya and Mathura, in their verses included in the Guru Granth Sahib, use the word takht in this very sense. Formally to proclaim Sikh faith's common concern for the spiritual and the worldly, synthesis of miri and piri, Guru Hargobind (1595-1644), son and successor of Guru Arjan, adopted royal style. For the ceremonies of succession, he had a platform constructed opposite the Harimandar, naming it Akal Takht. According to Gurbilas Chhevin Patshahi, a detailed versified and, going by the year of composition recorded in the text/colophon, the oldest account of Guru Hargobind's life, the structure was raised on Har vadi l0, 1663 Bk/15 June 1606. The Guru laid the cornerstone and Bhai Buddha and Bhai GurDas completed the construction, no third person being allowed to lend a helping hand. Guru Hargobind used the takht for the accession ceremonies which, according to the source quoted, took place on 26 Har sudi l0, 1663 Bk/24 June 1606. From here he conducted the secular affairs of the community. From here he is said to have issued the first hukamnama (q.v.) to far-flung sangats or Sikh centers announcing the creation of Akal Takht and asking them to include in their offerings thenceforth gifts of weapons and horses. Bhai Gurdas was named officiant in charge of the Akal Takht. A building subsequently raised over the Takht was called Akal Bunga (house) so that the Takht is now officially known as Takht Sri Akal Bunga although its popular name Akal Takht is more in common use.

    The Sikhs recognize four other holy places as takhts, namely Takht Sri Kesgarh Sahib, Anandpur; Takht Sri Harimandar Sahib, Patna Takht Sachkhand Hazur Sahib, Abchalnagar, Nanded and Takht Sri Damdama Sahib, Talvandi Sabo. All four are connected with the life of Guru Gobind Singh (1666-1708). All five Takhts are equally venerated, but the Akal Takht at Amritsar enjoys a special status. Historically, this is the oldest of the takhts and along with Harimandar, across the yard, constitutes the capital of Sikhism. Meetings of the Sarbatt Khalsa or general assembly representative of the entire Panth are traditionally summoned at Akal Takht and it is only there that cases connected with serious religious offences committed by prominent Sikhs are heard and decided. Hukamnamas or decrees issued by the Akal Takht are universally applicable to all Sikhs and all institutions.

    After Guru Hargobind's migration to Kiratpur early in 1635, the shrines at Amritsar, including the Akal Takht, fell into the hands of the descendants of Prithi Chand, elder brother of Guru Arjan, his grandson, Hariji (d.1696), remaining in charge for over fifty-five years. Soon after the creation of the Khalsa in March 1699, Guru Gobind Singh sent Bhai Mani Singh to Amritsar to assume control of the Harimandar and the Akal Takht and manage these on behalf of the Khalsa Panth. During the troublous period following the martyrdom of Banda Singh in 1716, the sacred sarovar, or holy tank, at Amritsar, the Harimandar and the Akal Takht continued to be a source of inspiration and spiritual rejuvenation for the Sikhs. Whenever circumstances permitted, and usually on Baisakhi and Divali, their scattered bands defying all hazards converged upon Akal Takht to hold Sarbatt Khalsaassemblies and discuss matters of policy and strategy. For instance, through a gurmata (Guru's counsel) the sarbati khalsa at the Akal Takht resolved on 14 October 1745 to reorganize their scattered fighting force into 25, jathas or bands of about 100 warriors each. By another gurmata on Baisakhi, 29 March 1748, the sarbatt khalsa meeting, again, at Akal Takht, formed the Dal khalsa or the army of the Khalsa consisting of 11 misls or divisions. On Divali, 7 November 1760, the sarbati khalsa resolved to attack and occupy Lahore (till then Sikhs had not occupied any territory, their only possession being the small fortress of Ram Rauni or Ramgarh they had built at Amritsar in 1746). Akal Takht was again the venue of the sarbatt khalsa on Baisakhi day, 10 April 1763, when by a gurmata it was decided to go out to the help of a Brahman who had brought the complaint that his wife had been forcibly abducted by the Afghan chief of Kasur.

    Even after the Punjab had been parcelled out into several Sikh independencies or misls, Amritsar remained the common capital where all sardars or chiefs had built their builgas and stationed their vakils or agents. But as the need for a common strategy and action decreased and rivalries among the mist chiefs raised their head, sarbatt khalsa and correspondingly the Akal Takht lost their political pre-eminence. Maharaja Ranjit Singh felt little need for sarbati khalsa assemblies after 1805 when it was summoned to consider the question whether or not the fugitive Maratha prince Jasvant Rao Holkar be assisted against the British. The religious authority of the Akal Takht, however, remained intact and the State never challenged it in any manner.

    There are in fact instances of the State showing subservience as in the case of Maharaja Ranjit Singh himself responding to the summons from the Akal Takht and accepting for a moral misdemeanor penalty imposed by its custodian, Akali Phula Singh who had fought as a loyal soldier in several of the Maharaja's military campaigns.

    In spite of its supremacy in the matter of enforcing religious discipline, Akal Takht discharges no divine dispensation. It remits no sins, nor does it invoke God's wrath upon anyone.

    On several occasions during the eighteenth century, Akal Takht shared with the Harimandar desecration and destruction at the hands of Mughal satraps and Afghan invaders. Ahmad Shah Durrani, who had razed the Harimandar in 1762, again attacked Amritsar in December 1764. On this occasion a small band of 30 Sikhs under their leader, Nihang Gurbakhsh Singh stationed there to serve and protect the Akal Takht, came out to dare the invading horde and fell fighting to the last man. Ahmad Shah had the Akal Bunga completely demolished. Sikhs, however, continued to hold the sarbatt kha/sa in front of the ruins and decided at one such gathering on Baisakhi, 10 April 1765, to rebuild the Akal Bunga as well as the Harimandar. Funds for this purpose had already been set apart from the pillage of Sirhind in January 1764. The work was entrusted to Bhai Des Raj, who was also furnished with Guru ki Mohar or the Guru's seal to enable him to raise more funds. The construction of the ground floor of the Akal Bunga was completed by 1774. The rest of the five-storied domed edifice was completed during the reign of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. The gilded dome atop the building was built by Hari Sifigh Nalva at his own expense. The facade of the first four storey’s including the basement (originally ground floor but rendered partly below ground level because of the raising of the level of the circumambulatory terrace in front) had a semi-circular orientation. The ground floor was a large hall with an attached pillared marble portico. The facades of the next two floors had projected eaves supported on decorative brackets. The facade of the third floor, a large hall with galleries on the sides, had cusped arched openings, nine in number. The exterior of the fourth floor, covering the central hall of the lower floor, was decorated with projected ornamental eaves and a domed kiosk at each corner. The Guru Granth Sahib was seated on the first floor, where the jathedar of the Akal Takht also took his seat. The second floor was used for important meetings and also for amrit prachar, administration of the initiation of the Khalsa. The hall on the third floor was used especially for the meetings of the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee until a separate office block, called Teja Singh Samundari Hall, was constructed for the purpose during the 1930's.

    The beautiful and sacred edifice was destroyed in the army action, called Operation Blue Star, in early June 1984. The Government of India got the building reconstructed in order to assuage the injured feelings of the Sikhs, but this was not acceptable to them. The reconstructed building was demolished in early 1986 to be replaced by one raised through kar seva, voluntary free service of the Panth and by money accruing from voluntary donations.

    After the death of Guru Gobind Singh with whom ceased the line of living Gurus, hukamnamas were issued in the name of the Khalsa Panth from the different takhts, especially Akal Takht at Amritsar. Any Sikh transgressing the religious code could be summoned, asked to explain his conduct and punished. Disobedience amounted to social ostracism of an individual or the group concerned. Maharaja Ranjit Singh, 19th century ruler of the Punjab, was summoned by Akali Phula Singh, the then jathedar of Akal Takht, for violating established norms of Sikh behavior and laid under expiation. Among instances from recent history a striking one is that of Teja Singh of Bhasaur who was censured for the liberties he was taking with the Sikh canon. A hukamnama issued from the Akal Takht on 26 Savan 1985 Bk/9 August 1928 read:

    The Panch Khalsa Diwan (Panch Khand), Bhasaur, has published books called Gurmukhi courses in which the bani of Sri Guru Granth Sahib has been garbled and its order changed.

    Changes have been made in gurmantra, the ardas and the ceremonies for administering amrit. These are anti-Sikh proceedings. Hence Baba Teja Singh and Bibi Niranjan Kaur [his wife] are hereby excommunicated from the Panth. Other members of the Panch Khalsa Diwan are debarred from having ardas offered on their behalf at Sri Akal Takht Sahib or at any other Gurdwara. No Sikh should purchase Gurmukhi courses published by the Panch Khalsa Diwan, nor keep them in his possession. The Panch Khalsa Diwan or whoever else has copies of these should send them to Sri Akal Takht Sahib.

    An example of an individual penalized for disobeying the Akal Takht edict was that of
    Bhai Santa Singh, the Nihang, who for the charge brought against him, was excommunicated from the Panth (Hukamnama, 8 Savan 515 Nanak Shahij22 July 1984). Hukamnamas have also been issued to settle points of religious and political disputation; also for commending the services to the Panth of individuals and for adding passages to Sikh ardas, the daily prayer of supplication, as a particular historical situation might demand. On 26 Jeth 1984 Bkl8 June 1927, the Akal Takht eulogized in a hukamnama Bhai Sahib Sardar Kharak Sirigh for his qualities of determination and steadfastness and for his sacrifices in the cause of the Panth; likewise, on 30 Bhadon 1988 Bk/15 September 1931, Bhai Sahib Randhir Singh was honored for his outstanding services to the Panth. On 20 Asuj 1970 Bk/4 October 1913, Takht Sachkhand Sri Hazur Sahib promulgated a hukamnama fixing the length of kirpan or sword a Sikh will carry slung from across his shoulder at a minimum of one foot. On 12 Magh 483 Nanak Shahi/25 January 1952, Akal Takht enjoined upon the "entire Khalsa and all Gurdwara ministers" to add these lines to the ardas.

    0 Timeless Lord, the Benevolent One, ever the succourer of Thy Panth, we pray grant the Khalsaji the privilege of unhindered access to and control and maintenance of Sri Nankana Sahib and other holy shrines and sites from which the Panth has been parted [after the partition of the Punjab in 1947].

    Such writs promulgated under the seal of a Takht carry sanction for the entire Sikh people.

    BIBLIOGRAPHY

    1. Gordon, John J. H. , The Sikhs. Patiala, 1970
    2. Dilgeer, Harjinder Sirigh, The Akal Takht Jalandhar, 1980
    3. Kapur Sirigh, "Akal Takht, " in The Sikh Sansar. June 1976
    4. Harbans Singh, The Heritage of the Sikhs. Delhi, 1983
    5. Sukhdial Sirigh, Akal Takht Sahib. Patiala, 1984
    6. Gian Singh, Giani, Twarikh Guru Khalsa [Reprint]. Patiala, 1970 7. Gurbilas Chhevin Patshahi. Patiala, 1970
    8. GaQQa Sirigh, Hukamname. Patiala, 1967
    9. Ashok, Shamsher Sirigh, NlsalJ te Hukamname. Amritsar, 1967


    Cordially,

    Virinder S. Grewal
     
  14. spnadmin

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Tejwant ji

    I am not surprised by your answer. :}8-: I posted the article with the intent of "mischief" to get a debate going. Of course, that is one of the sakhis that has fallen under suspicion and so it does not serve as evidence in that framework. If you read the entire article you will see that there are many other statements made therein that are questionable as matters of fact or doctrine. Please forgive me -- but I did not want to come right out and state my motive. It is highly likely that no one will be able to produce evidence in response to your questions. :}8-:
     
  15. spnadmin

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Virinderj i

    I honestly do not think that this...

    Any Sikh transgressing the religious code could be summoned, asked to explain his conduct and punished. Disobedience amounted to social ostracism of an individual or the group concerned.

    .. is going to happen to the vast majority of individuals who have espoused shall we say "unorthodox" points of view. Especially by Akal Takht. For starters, the Takht would have to begin in India with all the members of sangats aligned with other Takhts that have a maryada that is starkly different from SRM, and whose practices are singularly different from those espoused by Akal TAkht, and in some cases border on pooja. For example, the Akal Takht would have to tackle Budha Dal on the issue of equal paraksh of Dasam Granth and other scriptures with Sri Guru Granth Sahib. :advocate:
     
  16. Tejwant Singh

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Narayanjot ji,

    Guru Fateh.

    Yours and my intentions are exactly the same.:). This subject needs to be debated.

    Tejwant Singh
     
  17. vsgrewal48895

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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Dear Teji & Narayanjot Ji,

    IMHO this topic is out dated and I do not care about it as self described humble Sikh. I just asked the question to start a debate too and presented the historical facts as stated in the Encyclopedia of Sikhs. It has no teeth in this and is just to create fear and superstiton in the minds of Sikhs at large. It has lead to lot of religious corruption in hands of Jathedars.

    Cordially,

    Virinder
     
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  18. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    OK virinder ji

    I will chill. Thanks.
     
  19. harbansj24

    harbansj24
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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    May I contribute in a general and commonsense manner?

    A Sikh who has had Amrit and commits a Bajar Kuraet is supposed to on his own go to a place where Amrit Sanchar is taking place and admit his Kuraet in front of Panj Piare and ask for the forgiveness. The Panj Piare will collectively impose a tankhah for example cleaning the shoes of sangat in a Gurudwara for 21 days, reciting chaupai sahib 11 times a day for 21 days and at the end of 21 days doing Ardas in the Gurudwara. In my personal opinion this is quite acceptable.

    As far as Akal Takht is concerned only those persons are declared as Tankhayas, who are well known in the Panth and are in a position to influence significant number of Sikhs because of their example and in the opinion of Akal Takht are setting a wrong precedent. As per folklore Akali Phula Singh summoned Maharaja Ranjit Singh and ordered whiplashes for courting a coutesan.

    So Akal Takht does not summon annonymous Sikhs.

    There may be other Takhts but only Akal Takht was set up by Guru Hargobind ji to be custodian of both Miri and Piri.

    It is a different matter that in the recent past it has been misused for political purposes mainly by Akali dal
     
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  20. japjisahib04

    japjisahib04 Kuwait
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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Virinder Ji, But a humble gursikh always try to become an asset of the community and not a liability.

    Best regards
    Mohinder Singh Sahni
     
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  21. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Re: Excommunication of a Sikh ?

    Tankhauyah..is derived from the word Tankhah..Monthly RENUMERATION....a sum we all get paid for work we do for our employers...

    IN the decades following 1708...there were a considerable number of "SIKHS" in the employ of the Mughal Govt....and they drew a Tankhah...for services rendered...a famous example is the father and son team of Subegh Singh who were later martyred by being torn alive on the wheel..charkharree !! These "Sarkaree Sikhs" time and again served as intermediaries between the Rebellious Khalsa and the Mughal Govt on ocassions. Thus they were called TANKHIYAH SIKHS...and whenever they came tot he Khalsa they were often given a "soft punishment - Tankhah of paath/service/seva to wash off the mughal services..before they were allowed to join them.
    AS time went on the Mughal Govt became so brutal and partisan that all sikhs left their services/or were martyred. So no more Tankhiyah sikhs..until the Modern Times .
     
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