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Differently Abled - Spare Them a Thought...

Discussion in 'Community Out-Reach' started by Chaan Pardesi, Apr 28, 2011.

  1. Chaan Pardesi

    Chaan Pardesi
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    People living with disabilities need all the support that they can get.Sikhism teaches to help humanity, but it is a shame there are "Sikhs" or so they think they are who are hell bent on being cleaner than thou and hurt people who are helpless because of their disabilities.It is thank you to such shameless over egoed and imbecile minded Sikhs that some Sikhs get hurt and then seek religions like Christianity.Shame shame upon such moronic Sikhs who think they are better than the others and take it upon themselves to "sort" the next weaker person..instead of finding a way to help them.Instead of finding shoe covers or washing up the wheels etc they find pleasure in degrading helpless Sikh disabled man.I am ashamed such Gurduaras exist of all places in Malaysia- where their Sikh daughters & sons run off with non Sikhs and get married to non Sikhs, that they cannot do anything about;but BULLY a helpless man.I am so incensed about these cleaner than the rest so called moronic Sikhs, that I cant find enough words to condemn such FOOLS of Sikhs.I wonder what would they do when their sons or daughters or relative have disabilities....?As i read about such fools called "Sikhs " and such "Gurduaras ", I am get very angry.Please read this sad story of Gurdial singh...

    Their sons and daughters are married in the Gurduaras to non sikhs breaking every rule of the maryada but that they are not worried then.Most of the Gurduaras have Mona parbandhaks who cannot understand a word of Punjabi or know which are the Gurus, but they make themselves the thekedaars of the Sikhs religion to BULLY this man.Shame, shame upon such low life individuals.This needs to be condemned in strong words...

    I get very angry and ashmed by their acts in the name of Sikhi.Please read this sad story of Gurdial singh........................................



    WHEN Gurdial Singh woke up one morning and found blood on his blanket, he realised that something was wrong. Gurdial had been suffering from high fever for three days.
    His wife rushed him to a nearby government hospital where they found that Gurdial – a diabetic – had been harbouring a nasty blister on his left toe. He was not aware of the bleeding blister because he had no sensation in that area. More bad news was in store: Gurdial was advised to have his leg amputated.
    “My only concern at that time was to stay alive,” recalled Gurdial, 82.
    “The five doctors who treated me were very professional,” he added. “They made it clear why amputation was the only way out for me.”
    His doctors gave him a detailed description of the process – right up until when he would be fitted with a prosthetic leg to enable him to walk again. Looking back, he said there were several key factors which helped him to make the right decision and accept his new life as an amputee.
    Gurdial is very thankful for the support given by his wife.
    “She has always been there for me right from day one. I truly appreciate her for it. We made the decision for the amputation together. My wife was with me throughout the ordeal as I struggled to adjust to my new life.
    “I am also grateful to my in-laws for their moral support. They even helped with the arrangements to have the amputated limb (from the knee below) cremated in a temple whilst I was still in hospital.”
    Gurdial pointed out that his healthcare professionals also played a big role in his recovery. “The doctors told me everything – from what would happen immediately after the surgery to how long it would take before an artificial limb would be given to me. These insights were invaluable to my rehabilitation.”
    A wheelchair donation from a state assemblyman before Gurdial’s prosthesis arrived and the sponsorship of the costs of the limb by the Welfare Department proved to be a most welcome gift during his time of need. However, there were changes in Gurdial’s life after his disability.
    “Although most of the people I meet talk to me just like a normal person, the invitations that I used to get for social events like weddings, housewarming parties and even New Year gatherings began to drop since I started using a prosthesis to move around,” said Gurdial. “This is probably because of superstitious beliefs about disabilities.”
    Gurdial pointed out that there are people who believe that a pregnant woman should never go near a disabled person in case the unborn child becomes deformed.
    “When I started to use an artificial limb, nothing about me changed at all,” he said. “I am the same human being with normal feelings like everyone else. It is important that people remember this.”
    Gurdial pointed out a couple of incidents which showed up the ignorance people have towards disabilities.
    He visited a Sikh temple in Kuala Lumpur once where he was not allowed into the dining room because of his prosthetic leg. A temple official pointed to a sign on the wall which said: “No Shoes Allowed!”
    When he tried to explain that he really had no choice because of his mobility problems, he was told: “A rule is a rule!”
    Gurdial had another unpleasant experience when he visited a Sikh temple in Petaling Jaya, Selangor. He managed to get into the dining area but halfway through his meal, he was approached by someone who insisted that he remove his shoes or leave. Gurdial had no choice but to comply.
    The person offered to take the food and serve him outside. However, not wanting to be humiliated, Gurdial turned him down.
    Gurdial pointed out that temples that practise such policies should be more sensitive to the needs of people with disabilities.
    Meanwhile, a check with a committee member from the temple confirmed that they do not practise any form of discrimination against the disabled.
    Anyone who experiences such treatment is advised to contact the committee at once.





    http://thestar.com.my/columnists/st.../columnists/wheelpower/8548820&sec=wheelpower
     

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  3. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Re: Spare Them a Thought

    Those are SELF APPOINTED holier than thou "sevadaars"...the very same variety of "Civil servants" we find in the Civil service (really UNcivilised Msters who demand bribes to do work they are paid for..arrogant, rude, absent most of the time etc).
    These "sewadaars" take it as their RIGHT to do any sewa...push out any others doing that sewa..order others around..etc. They reserve the right to serve/NOT SERVE anyone they like/dislike !! I know one who serves Daal in Langgar..He IGNORES all thsoe he doesnt like..he will just WALK PAST you if eh doesnt like you !! he makes it a POINT to IGNORE a lady who comitted the gross insult of divorcing his abusive son who was her husband...that earned her the title of " most hated ex daughter in law !!" So whenever shes seate din pangat..he will just walk past her looking the other way...as IF that DAAL BALTEE is his fathers property !!
    I call these not sewadaars..BUT DAWEHDAARS..IMPOSTERS.
     
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  4. Kanwaljit Singh

    Kanwaljit Singh India
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    Re: Spare Them a Thought

    Really sad, insensitive, unimaginative handling by the sewadar and worse, no one from sangat came in to help.
     
  5. Kanwaljit Singh

    Kanwaljit Singh India
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    Re: Spare Them a Thought

    Everyone has their Test of Time !
     
  6. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Re: Spare Them a Thought

    You know this is the second thread on this issue, in only a few months...the other article is about a gurdwara in UK with similar issues with wheelchairs. We never got a final update on whether the sangat really did have a rule posted. That is however beside the point. If this is a widespread problem and disabled people are being deprived of a basic need - spiritual company, sangat - then pangat on the steps outside is a slap in the face. We do not live by roti alone!

    Do we have a next step in raising consciousness? I would be interested in hearing what forum members' ideas for changing this.
     
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  7. Mai Harinder Kaur

    Mai Harinder Kaur
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    I have not been turned away or thrown out of a gurudwara, but I usually feel quite unwelcome. I cannot matha tek, especially since the knee arthritis has gotten so much worse. One dear lady always very sweetly cleans the bottom of my cane, others are not so gracious. I have to sit at the very back of the hall in a very uncomfortable chair. It's not as bad as not being allowed in, but it still feels like a sort of exile. I wonder if there is some reason (other than tradition and pure cussedness) that a chair could not be put against the wall closer to Guru ji. Not just a chair for me, of course, also for others who need it.

    I have thought of other possibilities, too, but those would involve construction work and I doubt anyone would consider that.

    Traditionally, Sikhs are a martial people. What has been done with injured sant-sipahis in the past? Have our honoured wounded been turned away from the gurudwara?
     
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  8. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    You are amritdhari and you have these experiences?

    A plan is formulating in my mind. You have mentioned many things that have already crossed my plane of thought that need to be part and parcel of how we proceed.

    In the Gurus' days, the elderly, infirm, disabled and wounded were carried in on litters by devoted sangat. They were fed lovingly if needed at langar. The world has changed. No one wants to be reminded of their own vulnerability. the sight of a disabled person reminds us that we are always only a breath away from being old, sick, inform and dependent ourselves. Better never to have to look at it.
     
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  9. Mai Harinder Kaur

    Mai Harinder Kaur
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    Being amritdhari these days doesn't give any automatic respect. More important to deserving respect, I think, is that I am a 1984 survivor and fighting in Delhi gave me the wounds that make it hard for me to get around today. :swordfight-kudiyan:

    I think about our brothers and sisters tortured and left lame by the goons of KP- Kill, I mean Gill. Those of us who have given and lost so much I think have earned that respect and some extra accommodation.

    One idea I have for those who can walk such as myself but cannot sit on the floor involves something a bit like people sit on in a jacuzzi, sitting on the floor but with the legs on a kind of stair. As I said, it would involve some construction. For those in wheelchairs, perhaps the whole chair could be lowered to the seat would be a floor-level. These handicapped spaces could be covered when not in use and open as needed. I'm not sure my description really conveys what I'm talking about. I hope you get the idea.
    animatedkhanda1
     
  10. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Post deleted Astroyboy ji

    Let us remember that we are here to discuss issues not personalities. In addition, discussion of problems at specific gurdwaras is not a violation of forum rules. There is more than one thread here to that point. So no need to reframe someone's comments based on one's different view of the nature of a sangat problem. No need to place a direct link to a member's profile. No need to mention blogs that are not connected to this discussion. It is all very antoagonistic.

    :)

    spnadmi
    n
     

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