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Brides Purchased, Then Exploited n Haryana, Punjab

Discussion in 'Hard Talk' started by rajneesh madhok, Aug 28, 2011.

  1. rajneesh madhok

    rajneesh madhok India
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    With skewed sex ratios it is impossible to find a local mate for each man

    Decades of unchecked sex-selective abortions have made the once fertile States of Punjab and Haryana suffer a drought of brides, making human-trafficking a lucrative and expanding trade. Often projected as a voluntary marriage, every year, thousands of young women and girls are lured into the idea of a happy married life with a rich man in Punjab or Haryana. Sadly most ‘purchased brides' are exploited, denied basic rights, duplicated as maids, and eventually abandoned.

    ONLY SOLUTION

    With skewed sex ratios (Punjab-893, Haryana-877 females per 1,000 males) it is impossible to find a bride for each man, and ‘importing a bride' has become the only solution. Also, with the tradition of not marrying within the same village and eligible girls marrying the wealthiest suitor, often NRIs, the majority of men in villages are left unmarried and often addicted to drugs.

    “What is wrong in marrying a poor girl? I demanded no dowry, rather her family's social and economic position has improved,” said an agitated Prakash Singh of Harsola village in Kaithal (Haryana), when asked why he married a 19-year-old girl hailing from a poor village from Assam. Interestingly, Mr. Singh has three brothers and no sister; he does not believe that there is any dearth of women in his village.

    “There were no eligible girls in our village or social circle. After my son turned 35, we realised that unless we accept a non-Punjabi girl he would never be married and no one would carry the family name forward; so we had to make arrangements,” said Mahinder Singh, an elderly man in Pohlo Majra, Fatehgarh Sahib (Punjab). The migration might seem to be a measure to correct the gender imbalance, but the ultimate goal is producing sons.

    “Marriage to an imported bride makes caste, language and culture immaterial as long as the price is paid to the girl's family and a male child is born. Depending on the age, looks and virginity of a girl, grooms pay anywhere from Rs. 50,000 and Rs. 300,000,” said Rishi Kant of Shakti Vahini, a non-governmental organisation working on the issue.

    The obvious need gives the practice a social sanction and makes it look like a social service: Sushma Kaur of Pohlo Majra, who married a Sikh man 15 years elder to her, calls it a ‘blessing.' “My uncle arranged the match, it was difficult in the beginning because of the new language and the culture, but my husband took care of me...My village in Bengal has an excess of females and no one to care for them, and it is a great service if I can arrange a matrimonial match. Ever since I got married, 10 years ago, over a dozen girls have followed me from Bengal,” she says with pride. She added that none of the girls were ill-treated; however, it was not unheard of.

    A field study on the impact of sex ratio on the pattern of marriages in Haryana by Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra covering over 10,000 households, revealed that over 9,000 married women in Haryana were bought from other States.

    The study which covered 92 villages of Mahendragarh, Sirsa, Karnal, Sonepat, and Mewat districts said that most of the people accepted it as a common practice, but denied having bought a bride in their family.

    “In every village there are over 50 girls that have been bought; some of them as young as 13 and a very small percentage of the ‘sold for marriage' women are found to be living a married life. Most are untraceable or exploited or duplicated as domestic servants by the agents or men who marry/buy them. There are also instances of girls being resold to other persons after living a married life for a few years,” the study added.

    Most of them come from poverty-ridden villages of Assam, West Bengal, Jharkhand, Bihar and Orissa, because their families need money; and despite the prevalence of the dowry system in the north Indian states, men are ready to pay for a wife.
    http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2400857.ece
    Rajneesh Madhok
     
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  3. rajneesh madhok

    rajneesh madhok India
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    The comments posted by the readers are quite shocking:
    COMMENTS:
    This is the beginning of end of a race and culture! I pity the great warrior sikhs and rajputs who have become too cowards to raise a girl child.Holding a kirpan or a stick does not make one a courageous man, but to taste the tenderness and beauty of raising a girl child is! May God save this otherwise wonderful people.
    from: john britto
    Posted on: Aug 27, 2011 at 09:11 IST

    This report reveals a true picture of the girls brought from outside Haryana and Punjab from other states for the purpose. But the situation of the Kerala girls who married people from Sirsa,Haryana appears to be different. This report does not mention about them
    from: Prof.Surinder Nath
    Posted on: Aug 27, 2011 at 13:49 IST
     

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