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Bhai GUrdas ji

Discussion in 'Gurmat Vichaar' started by Sikh80, Jan 4, 2008.

  1. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    Bhai Gurdas: The Blessed Scribe

    Bhai Gurdas, the amanuensis, who inscribed the Adi Granth at the dictation of Guu Arjun was also the author of 39 vars (ballads in the heoric meter) in Punjabi and 556 kabits (couplets) in Braj language. These vars are of great historical and theological importance. The vars are regarded as the key to an understanding of the Sikh scriptures and Sikhism. They are the only really authentic references to the period of the third, fourth, fifth and the sixth Sikh Gurus by a Sikh. Bhai Gurdas’s commentary on Sikh practices is a valuable indication of the state of things at that time.

    Bhai Gurdas was born in Goindwal in 1551 AD. He was the son of Datar Chand, the younger brother of the third Sikh Guru Amar Das. The name Gurdas was given to him by Guru Amar Das and he took the child’s education into his own hands. Gurdas was quick to learn and soon became one of the chief exponents of the teachings of the Gurus. On the death of Guru Amar Das, the fourth Guru Ram Das formally initiated Gurdas into the faith and sent him to Agra as a missionary. On the death of Guru Ram Das, Gurdas returned to Amritsar and presented himself before Guru Ram Das’s successor - Guru Arjun. Gurdas was first engaged in trying to appease Prithi Chand, the Guru’s elder brother who had set himself as a rival guru and had launched a campaign of vilification against Guru Arjun. Bhai Gurdas failed in this mission. His var 36 on Prithi Chand’s attitude is fully of vituperation. Then Gurdas came back to Guru Arjun and turned his attention to purely academic pursuits. So Guru Arjun in 1603 AD, when he started the great task of compiling the Adi Granth, chose Gurdas as the scribe. The volume was completed in the summer of 1604 AD and was installed in the Hari Mandir, Amritsar.
     
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  3. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    The Mughal Emperor Akbar, while passing through the Punjab desired to scrutinize the sacred volume and see for himself whether there was any truth in the allegation that it contained some references derogatory to Islam and the Prophet. Gurdas was entrusted with this mission of taking the Granth to the Emperor. The volume was opened at random three times, but none of the passages had anything offensive to Muslim susceptibilities. On the contrary, at least two passages echoed sentiments complimentary to the Islamic faith. Akbar made the offering of 51 gold mohars to the Holy Book and presented a pair of expensive Kashmiri Shawls to Gurdas.
    After the martyrdom of Guru Arjun and during the years of his successor Guru Hargobind, who was imprisoned in Gwalior fort, the affairs of the Sikh community were left in the hands of trusted followers among whom were Bhai Gurdas and Bhai Buddha.
    Tradition asserts that this Bhai Buddha was the disciple of the first Sikh Guru Nanak and lived from 1506 to 1631 AD. He died at Ramdaspur which is now called Amritsar. He was given the name Bhai Buddha, signifying a wise old man, by Guru Nanak, while still a boy. Bhai Buddha took part in the installation ceremony of the next five Gurus. He was the first Granthi of the Adi Granth. On Guru Hargobind’s release from Gwalior fort from prison on Diwali Day, which Sikhs call ‘Bandi Chhod Diwas’ as Guru Har Gobind, along with his own release, also got the release of 52 Hindu Rajas also imprisoned in the same fort by the Emperor Jehangir. Guru Har Gobind sent Gurdas to Kabul to buy horses as Guru Har Gobind, following the execution of his father, Guru Arjun, decided to arm his followers and then train them as soldiers. Before Gurdas could complete the deal to buy horses, the money was stolen from him and the crestfallen Gurdas, being unable to face his master, fled to Benaras. He was apprehended and was brought to Amritsar. Guru Har Gobind forgave him and Gurdas again resumed his duties as the chief organizer of the then scattered Sikh community. At this time, Guru Har Gobind’s militant ways and his close association with Muslims who had tormented his father Guru Arjun caused a certain amount of unrest in the Sikh community. Gurdas rose to his master’s defence. To him Guru Har Gobind was ‘the destroyer of enemy hordes, the hero of battles, the great warrior’ as well as ‘the great benefactor’.
     
  4. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    Gurdas remained celibate and passed away at Goindwal in 1629 AD. His funeral rites were performed by Guru Har Gobind himself.
    Bhai Gurdas did not set out to write a work of history, but there are several references, mostly in var 11 to persons and events which are of some importance to the historians of today. In the copies of Gurdas’ vars which are current today, there is the 40th var written by the Sindhi poet of Shikarpur of the same name. This Sindhi Gurdas lived in the time of Banda Bahadur (1670-1716 AD). His composition, though in the same meter as that used by the elder Gurdas is of the higher poetic quality and is frequently quoted in describing the mission of Guru Gobind Singh.
    q
     
  5. Sikh80

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  6. Sikh80

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    Bhai Gurdas (1551-1636) is a much honoured Sikh scholar, missionary, and literary master who is also respected for his Sikh way of life. He was a leading figure in Sikhism who enjoyed the company of Guru Arjan, the fifth Sikh Guru . It was under the supervision of the fifth Sikh Guru that he inscribed the first copy of Sikh Scripture, the Guru Granth Sahib, which is now respect as the perpetual Guru of the Sikhs and is central of the Sikh religion. He was also responsible for various writings in his own right which have gained much respect in the Sikh community. His Varan have been referred to Guru Arjan as the "Key" to the Guru Granth Sahib.
    Bhai sahib was born in a Bhalla Khatri family. His father was Bhai Ishar Das and his mother's name was Mata Jivani. He was born at Goindval, Punjab, India in 1551AD. He was the nephew of third Guru, Guru Amar Das. (see Guru family tree) Bhai Gurdas was a first cousin of Mata Bhani, mother of Guru Arjan Dev.


    Bhai Gurdas - SikhiWiki, free Sikh encyclopedia.
     

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