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Basic Of Sikhism

Discussion in 'Gurmat Vichaar' started by Sikh80, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    SCANNEDhttp://www.allaboutsikhs.comKindly refer the above link for excellent write ups.
     
    #1 Sikh80, Dec 4, 2007
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2008
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  3. Sinister

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    id read that but im afraid ill go blind
     
  4. Sikh80

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    Hi Siny..
    U may kindly visit the site given below and go thru. all that U like. sorry, brother it was my mistake.

    You were Blocked
     
  5. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    Questions and Answers
    (about Sikhism by Jasprit Singh)
    SELF-ACCEPTANCE (kesh, tattoos, body piercings...)
    Self-acceptance is an integral part of the Sikh faith. Guru Gobind Singh, when confronted with spineless men and women of Indian society...people who blindly followed and bowed before manmade laws, no matter how degrading...introduced the Kesh-Kangha privilege: Kesh (or unshorn hair) as a symbol of acceptance of the Creator's given form, and Kangha (or comb) to take care of the Kesh...to keep it healthy and clean.

    In most cultures body modifications such as haircuts (many jobs are off-limits for men with kesh), circumcision, tattoos, etc., are demanded to ensure conformity and order. So much so that in the 1960s when the Hippie Movement started in America, men grew their hair long and kept their beards as a symbol of rebellion. However, the Sikh concepts of kesh-kangha is not a sign of rebellion...it is a sign of acceptance of the Creator's gift and a nurturing of that gift.

    Q: Why does Sikhism reject haircuts, circumcision and other similar rituals that a large fraction of the world's population practices? Do Sikhs consider these people sinners or bad people?

    A large part of the world's population does participate in rituals such as shaving of hair, circumcision, body piercing, etc. In this sense, Sikhs are in the minority. However, for a Sikh, acceptance of Nature's beautiful body is an important component of the Sikh value system. Acceptance of one's God-given physique without "improving" it by razors and scissors is a first step in accepting other laws, the foremost of which is becoming a universal being. Sikhs view others who engage in such rituals as people who carry unnecessary burdens in their lives; not as sinners or bad people.
    Q: What does the Guru Granth Sahib say about body modifications such as haircuts, circumcision, tattoos, body piercings, etc.?
    It is common for religion texts to provide very detailed outlines of do's and don'ts. The Bibles (old and new) and the Koran provide very detailed guidelines to their flock on daily living. The Guru Granth Sahib refrains from doing this. The Guru only provides us basic Universal principles (One God, Truth brings bliss, oneness of the human race, etc.) and the path to reach Truth (by minimizing ego and seeing oneself in everyone). In the Sikh "rahitnama" or code of conduct, kesh is to be accepted as the Creator's gift and taken care of with a kangha (comb).
    Acceptance of the Creator's given body is a natural outcome of a lifestyle that is in conformity with the Guru's teaching. Of course, this does not preclude the use of surgery or other medical interventions when the body has become ill.
    Q:Why are there so few Sikhs and how do Sikhs feel about being such a small minority?
    It is true that Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism can claim over a billion followers each, while there are only twenty million or so Sikhs. However, this is not a source of pessimism for a Sikh. A Sikh's goal is to be in Chardhi Kala (unbounded optimism) because Sikhism is a religion of Truth. The Guru's guidance makes sense, because it brings bliss in this life.
    Q:Don't you think that Sikh faith would have a lot more followers if Sikhs were allowed to shave and have haircuts?
    The Sikh faith is not a club or a party whose goal is to increase the number of people who profess to be Sikh. Kesh is definately the easiest part of being a Sikh. The other requirements: Always living in Truth; love for all (including non-Sikhs); standing against injustices (even at personal risk); giving up the arrogance of racial or lineage superiority...are immensely more difficult.
    Kesh and Khanga are a privilege we are given by the Creator...a privilege Guru Gobind Singh asked us to enjoy. Sikhi is a faith of the individual and his/her relation with the Creator. It requires courage and confidence even if one has to walk a lonely path.
    Q:I am a young woman. All of my friends shave thier legs. I do the same, but feel guilty. How can Sikh women participate in society if they don't carry out practices that are expected of them from that society?
    Women around the world and in all cultures have had to participate in all sorts of fashion pracitces to be "beautiful and desirable." Men were not subjected to these practices...practices which were sometimes degrading and always frivilous...because men set the rules. In China women's feet were bound...to the extent that grown women could barely walk due to their small and deformed feet. In many Islamic societies women are covered in cloth from head to toe, which puts them in a vulnerable position in public. In Western societies women are expected to pluck out their eyebrows, shave their legs, and if they wish to be on the beach in swimsuits, they undergo painful waxing procedures to strip out "unwanted hair"...a painful process. Most men would not dream of doing the same.
    Sikh women have an opportunity to make a statement here...provide personal examples of healthy living without these silly and irritating practices. Of course, it is much easier to conform!
    Q:I am a twelve year old boy. When I go to the gym locker room I see that most of the other boys are circumcised. I feel so different because I am not circumcised and I keep my hair long. How should I get over these feelings of being different?
    According to Jewish and Islamic beliefs is the duty of a good *** or Mulsim to be circumcised. This practice spread in North America and by the 1970s almost all American boys were routinely circumcised. This practice is reversing, and fast. It is expected that in another generation very few American boys will be circumcised (in European countries, this practice is rare).
    In a way, the idea of self-acceptance is spreading and more people are looking at male circumcision as a barbaric practice. Respected child psychologists and the American Association of Pediatrics are raising their concern against this practice. Even Jewish groups are arguing for the discontinuation of the practice of circumcision.
    So it is very likely that the boys you see in the locker room are envious that your parents did not circumcise you.
    Q:A number of women (Sikh) and men I know have piercings in thier ears (even in their nose and belly button). Is this acceptable?
    Only you should be the judge of what is acceptable. However, here are some comments that you may find useful. Only the person voluntarily having their body parts pierced can know why they would want to mutilate their God-given beautiful body. Perhaps they lack self-confidence, perhaps they are succumbing to peer pressure, or perhaps they have a desire to "rebel" against some imaginary power. In any case it would be logical to infer that this is not a practice in harmony with Sikh faith.
    Q:Is uncut hair and a turban all that is needed to become a good Sikh?
    No! A Sikh must incorporate universality into all aspects of his or her life. This is a lifelong discipline.
    Q:Why do Sikhs cut their nails and not their hair? Isn't it the same thing?
    If one does not clip the nails, they will grow too long and limit your ability to work and lead a healthy purposeful life. The hair offers no such problem. In life we have to make lots of choices...and the choice about what to do with our bodies and with nature are ever expanding. We can get tatoos, pierce our ears, nose, eyelids, and stomach. We can have implants in our breasts, chins, nose, buttocks...Some choices we make for healthy living. This is a good reason for a Sikh. Other choices we make to overcome our sense of insecutiry, or to feel fashionable or to belong to a particular group.
    A Sikh does cut his/her toenails, brushes his/her teeth, takes medication, etc., since these actions are required for healthy livng. We reject body piercings, circumcision, tatoos...and haircuts because they disfigure our bodies and are either useless for health or are quite unhealthy. The same approach can be used in our dealings with the Creator's other manifestations...animals, plants, rivers, oceans...


    Akal Sangat
     
  6. Sikh80

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  7. Sikh80

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  8. Sikh80

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  9. Sikh80

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  10. Sikh80

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    Sacred Scriptures of Sikhism: The Guru Granth Sahib
    Introduction by V.Jayaram
    Like the Bible of Christianity, the Vedas of Hinduism or the Koran of Islam, the Guru Granth Sahib, also known as the Adi Granth, is the main scripture of Sikhism. Compared to other religions, Sikhism is a religion of recent origin, founded in the 15th Century AD by its founder Sri Guru Nanak. Although like Islam it believes in the oneness of God and is opposed to idol worship, in many respects it is an offshoot of Hinduism and is much closer to Hinduism.
    It evolved primarily out of Hinduism, in line with the Bhakti marg or the devotional path of Hinduism, as a kind of reform movement In many respects, it is much more closer to Hinduism than either Buddhism or Jainism and unlike the latter it maintained a very healthy relationship with Hinduism throughout. The relationship between Hinduism and Sikhism can be compared to that of a son and father, where the son though a grown up individual has never lost his respect towards his father and took upon himself the responsibility of taking care of the latter.
    In all fairness we should say that during the Muslim rule and the subsequent British rule of India, Hinduism owed as much to Sikhs as to Hindus for its survival and continuity. Whenever it became vulnerable to the outside attacks and threats, the Sikhs stepped themselves into the role of the Kshatriyas and defended the land as well as the faith like true warriors of God.
    Whatever may be the case, however, those who study the Guru Granth Sahib are bound to realize that with regard to the emphasis it lays on pure and unconditional devotion to God, on a life that is dedicated completely to the remembrance of God, to the chanting of His Glory, His words and His Name, and the importance and necessity of a true Guru in ones spiritual salvation, Sikhism stands apart as a purely devotional religion and is way beyond all the known religions as an expression of pure and unconditional love to God.
    In its philosophy and emphasis it transcends all faiths. Because of its simplicity and unpretentious approach to God, it does not hurt, beyond tolerable limits, the religious sentiments or beliefs of any. And irrespective of the religion, the caste or the creed to which each belongs, it has the potential to appeal to all and inspire all.
    Sikhism became a religion by itself due to the untiring work and sacrifices made by the subsequent nine Gurus. The Sikh Gurus were sensitive to the social problems of their times and rejected many evils of Hindu society, especially the caste system, the prevalent superstition and excessive ritualism. They made Sikhism a popular religion in many parts of northern India, especially the Punjab region and many parts of northern India.
    The Gurus accepted many basic beliefs of Hinduism such as karma and rebirth and also used the names of some Hindu divinities in their Kirtans (musical songs) to extol the virtues of God or express their love for Him. It should however be remembered that Sikhism does not accept Hindu divinities and does not advocate worship of any divinities or idols other than God Himself in his Highest aspect. In its temperament and approach Sikhism stands apart from both Hinduism and Islam and lays down its own ground rules for the worship of God. The Sikh Gurus however made selfless efforts to narrow the social and religious gap between the Hindus and Muslims through their teachings, by emphasizing the similarities and by their unequivocal emphasis on the importance of true love to God as the basis of all religious worship. But they did not succeed much due to the religious bigotry of the Mughal rulers. Most of the Mughal emperors were opposed to the Sikh Gurus and persecuted them at the slightest opportunity.
    The Guru Granth Sahib in its present form was originally compiled by the tenth Guru, Guru Gobind Singh. The Scripture contains 5894 hymns of pure devotion composed in 18 ragas (musical patterns) by the ten Gurus and 15 Hindu and Muslim saints such as Kabir, Shiak Fareed etc. Of these Guru Nanak contributed 974 hymns. The hymns were originally composed in different languages such as Persian, mediaeval Prakrit, Hindi, Marathi, old Punjabi, Multani, and several local dialects.
    The basic philosophy of Sikhism revolves mainly around three concepts: Naam, the name of God, Shabad the word of God and Sat Sang, the company of the pious and the holy. These are the simple means to salvation. The Book teaches that outward rituals and indulgence in the worldly pleasure only bring us pain. What is required is inner purification, true devotion and surrender to God. The true Guru is the Naam, the name of God by remembering which constantly one can achieve salvation. However a Guru, who has become completely absorbed in the contemplation of Naam and has become united with God in thought and deed, can also help us to cross the world of illusion and taste the sweetness of the Lord.
    Special mention may be made of Japji, comprising of the thirty eight short poems of Nanak which appear at the beginning of the Adi Granth. It contains the essential teachings and beliefs of Sikhism and is considered to be very important. The poems are rendered in various ragas (musical modes) and are sung by Sikh devotees as a mark of devotion and respect to the Guru.
    Compiled in the sixteenth century and composed entirely in lyrical form, the hymns are mostly devotional in nature. During ceremonial occasions and functions, they are sung individually or in a chorus by the devotees with utmost devotion, love and humility. The Guru Granth Sahib can be truly called the essence of all religions, since it contains hymns and verses from many sacred books of various religions and sects of Hinduism.
    The Sikhs had ten Gurus in human form and after the tenth Guru it was decided that henceforth the Guru Granth Sahib would become the eleventh Guru and would remain so for ever as the living embodiment of the Gurus. The Book is kept in all the Gurudwaras, the Sikh places of worship and treated with great veneration as the "Guruji" Himself. In many Sikh households, wherever the book is, it is kept in sacred surroundings, treated with utmost respect, and recited with great devotion.
    Introduction to the Guru Granth Sahib with index
     
  11. Sikh80

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  12. Sikh80

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    Offspring Feel Threatened
    by Mother Faith
    India is a commonwealth of religions with every major faith represented in its population. Hinduism is the original religion of India, but Islam and Christianity also flourished there. Ancient Jews and Zoroastrians (from Iran), persecuted in their own land, also found sanctuary in the subcontinent. India also gave birth to three other religions: Jainism, Buddhism and Sikhism. Initially, these religions - their theology borrowed heavily from Hinduism - were perceived by Hindus as protest or reform movements or sects within Hinduism. Then, gradually, they evolved into distinct, independent religions.

    With the interaction of so many religions in one land, the exchange of ideas, customs and rituals was natural. Although the original beliefs of foreign religions like Islam, Christian remained in their practices, rituals and social customs were heavily influenced by Hinduism, which in turn, imported new ideas from these religions. The exchange of ideas between Hinduism and its three offspring was natural and obvious. The awesome capacity of Hinduism to "import and export" did not threaten Islam or Christianity in India, but it was perceived as a threat by its own offshoots. They worried that their "mother faith" threatened their independent identity.
    For example, when Buddhism emerged as an independent religion, almost the entire Indian population had embraced it. However, Hindu thinkers turned the table by accepting Buddha as their own avatar (divine incarnation) and by incorporating Buddhist concepts like ahimsa (non-violence). Hindus started worshipping Buddhist idols in their temples and Buddhists worshipped Hindu gods. The line between Hinduism and Buddhism blurred and the latter became, and remain, a minority religion in India.
    Jainism met the same fate when its major beliefs, vegetarianism and reverence of all living beings, were integrated into Hinduism, and Hindus accepted its founder Mahavira as a divine representation. Jains, despite some distinct features of their faith, integrated with Hindu society, socially and culturally, because of their natural affinity.
    This threat of absorption from Hinduism gave rise to separatist sentiments in the minds of modern leaders of Jainism, Buddhism and Sikhism. To asserts their distinctness, these leaders often downplay the similarities their faiths bear to Hinduism, and highlight the differences. The most recent instance of this practice is the anger stirred by India's constitution, which lumps Jainism, Buddhism and Sikhism with Hinduism due to their similarity to and common origin with their "mother religion." This fear of being swallowed by Hinduism took a political shape in India, and led to the Sikhs' demand for a separate state, called Khalistan.
    Historically, Hindus and Sikhs have been socially and culturally intertwined, and most of the major Sikh beliefs - karma, reincarnation, Moksha (salvation) and a guru as a divine representation - are borrowed from Hinduism. Hindu festivals like Diwali, Holi, Sankrant and Rakhri are also shared by Sikhs. In return, Hindus revere the first Sikh guru, Nanak Dev Jee, who was born of Hindu parents, and laud the sacrifices made by the last guru, Govind Singh Jee, who fought against the tyranny of the Muslim rulers.


    Until recently, the eldest son in most Hindu families in Punjab would become a baptized Sikh. The pictures of Sikh gurus adorn the walls of Hindu homes along with Hindu deities. It is not uncommon to find Hindus at prayer meetings in Sikh temples, and vice versa. Although Sikh gurus vehemently opposed the rigid Hindu caste system, most Sikhs still practice it. Hindus and Sikhs intermarry freely both in India and Canada; indeed five members of my own family are married to Sikhs.

    This intermingling is discouraged by many Sikh leaders and it undermines their claim of distinctness from Hinduism as well as their political cause. Despite the recent political turmoil in India's Punjab state, Canadian Hindus and Sikhs, after a brief interruption, continue their social and cultural intercourse.

    An estranged child may try to disown its mother, but a mother would never disown her children. Such is the relationship between Hinduism and the three faiths its spawned.

    Offspring Feel Threatened by Mother Faith by Ajit Adhopia
     
  13. Sikh80

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    Construction Of Guru Granth Sahib ji

    1. Jup:In seven parts, Jup describes the greatness of the Supreme Lord. Its very recitation or mere listening is bound to evoke deep devotion in the heart of the listener.2. So Dar The Word is Beauty. The Word is Power. In the crucible of Name, melts the nectar of the Name. No one really knows His true greatness3. So Purakh Naam is the breath of life. Those who have not sought the sanctuary of the true Guru and the Sangat are cursed. Those who serve God find peace. 4. Sohila Gurmukh is the living expression of Guru's Words. The teacher of teachers is one who appears in many forms. Meeting the Guru your affairs are resolved. Purchase only that for which you have come into this world.5. Siree Raag (291 KB) The splendor of maya is deceptive. In that place where the lowly are cared for, there His blessings rain down. Tell your troubles to the One who is the source of all comfort. The world is a drama staged in a dream. The body is pure in which the True Name abides. As we plant, so we harvest and eat.6. Raag Maajh (210 KB)He alone is a companion who shows me the way to Lord. The word of your bani is inside as well as outside. Meditating on the Naam, I have found great peace. God has produced everything in great abundance. Serving the True Guru is the greatest greatness...7. Raag Gauree (679 KB) Without the Fear of God, no one crosses over the world-ocean. The body is dust; the wind speaks through it. One who takes pride in himself shall never be right. The Lord's slaves attain the highest status of life. The Name makes a man pure and fearless. (This very long chapter contains the well known Sukhmani, the peace of mind.)8. Raag Aasaa (493 KB)This is also a very long chapter with 142 parts. Included in this are the compositions of Kabir, Dhanna, Daiv Shaik Fareed, Sant Ravidas, etc. 9. Raag Goojaree I would make Your Name the sandalwood, and my mind the stone to rub it on. His lamps are the sun and the moon. Cursed is that life, in which the Lord's Love is not obtained. When God instills His fear, a balanced detachment springs up in the mind. The most fortunate ones serve their Guru; there is no difference between the Divine Guru and the Lord.10. Raag Dayv Without the Name of the Lord, the beautiful are just like the noseless ones. O my mind, act as it pleases God. O mother, without the Guru, spiritual wisdom is not obtained. Whenever something comes to mind, it is You. In this world, I have seen love to be false. Whether they are spouses or friends, all are concerned only with their own happiness.11. Raag Bihaagra (75KB) All are travelers, who have gathered under the world-tree, and are bound by their many bonds. In this world, the best occupation is to sing the Praises of the Naam. Rituals and religions are all just entanglements; bad and good are bound up with them. The ignorant fools pick up stones and worship them. But when those stones themselves sink, who will carry you across?12. Raag Wadahans (138 KB)When the mind is filthy, everything is filthy; by washing the body, the mind is not cleaned. This mind is not controlled by any other discipline, except the Sanctuary of the True Guru. Emotional attachment to Maya is darkness; without the Guru, there is no wisdom. Dwell forever and ever upon the Lord God, and you shall find the gate of salvation.
    13. Raag Sorat'h (230 KB) Make your ever-decreasing life your shop, and make the Lord's Name your merchandise. The benefit of bathing at the sixty-eight sacred shrines of pilgrimage is obtained by the Blessed Vision of the Guru's Darshan. O mind, serve the True Guru, and obtain peace. As long as this person believes in love and hate, it is difficult for him to meet the Lord 14. Raag Dhanaasaree (129 KB) The body is the paper, and the mind is the inscription written upon it. The ignorant fool does not read what is written on his forehead. He alone is a Yogi, who understands the Way. He alone is a Qazi, who turns away from the world, and who, by Guru's Grace, remains dead while yet alive. He alone is a Brahmin, who contemplates God. The Lord saves His Saints. 15. Raag Jaitsree (61 KB) As Gurmukh, purchase the merchandise of the Naam. Whatever I wish for, I receive; my hopes and desires are fulfilled, meditating on God. I have enshrined that love which drenches my soul. Nothing seems sweet to His devotees, except the Lord. When God becomes merciful, Maya does not cling. 16. Raag Todee Forgetting God one is ruined forever. The sublime essence of Lord is found in the Saadh sangat. The Name of the Lord is the medicine. One who has found God keeps quiet about it...17. Raag Bairaaree God is supreme and is incomprehensible even to Gods. Meditate upon God constantly for salvation. Whatever your mind desires, that you will obtain. 18. Raag Tilang The world is transitory, Lord's devotees are like sandalwood, the body is dyed in greed, true peace comes with His name, 19. Raag Soohee (237 KB) Build the raft of meditation and self-discipline, to carry you across the river. That vessel alone is pure, which is pleasing to Him. One who looks upon all with a single eye, and knows them to be one and the same - he alone is known as a Yogi. That stone, which he calls his god, that stone pulls him down and drowns him.20. Raag Bilaaval (224 KB) I serve the Lord of the Universe; I have no other work to do. How rare is that person, who looks upon life and death alike. He alone serves the Guru, O Beloved, unto whom the Lord becomes merciful. They are said to be very fortunate, O Beloved, who who dwell in the Society of the Saints.21. Raag Gond (63 KB)Through the Naam, my affairs are resolved. My mind is accustomed to the Naam. Through the Naam, I have become fearless. Let your mind accept the Word of the Guru's Shabad, and His Mantra. Twenty-four hours a day, sing the Glorious Praises of the Lord. This is the purpose of human life.22. Raag Raamkalee (349 KB) Please rid me of the desire to live, O my Lord and Master. In the midst of hope, remain untouched by hope; then, O Nanak, you shall meet the One Lord. The Langar - the Kitchen of the Guru's Shabad has been opened, and its supplies never run short. Whatever His Master gave, He spent; He distributed it all to be eaten.23. Raag Nat Naaraayan Very fortunate are those who meditate on the Lord's Name; they alone are the Lord's devotees. Whoever chants His Name is liberated; whoever listens to it is saved, as is anyone who seeks His Sanctuary. The treasure of the Naam, the Name of the Lord, is everything for me.24. Raag Maale Gaaura The Panch Shabad, the five primal sounds, vibrate and resound in the Court of the Lord. The Naam, the Name of the Lord, is the Purifier of sinners; the unfortunate wretches do not like this. One may give donations in charity at Prayaag, and cut the body in two at Benares,
    but without the Lord's Name, no one attains liberation, even though one may give away huge amounts of gold.25. Raag Maaroo (425 KB) All must abandon their worldly homes; no one remains here forever.Forgetting the Lord, your own virtues shall rot away. The night is a net, and the day is a net; there are as many traps as there are moments. The food of spiritual wisdom is the supremely sweet essence. He alone is a Qazi, who practices the Truth. He alone is a Haji, a pilgrim to Mecca, who purifies his heart. He alone is a Mullah, who banishes evil.26. Raag Tukhaari The Word of the Shabad is the lamp which illuminates the three worlds; it slaughters the five demons. I am a stone in the Boat of the Guru. Please carry me across the terrifying ocean of poison. Without the Fear of God, His Love is not obtained. Without the Fear of God, no one is carried across to the other side.27. Raag Kaydaaraa That person, upon whom my Lord and Master showers His Mercy - the Lord attunes that one to Himself. Let my mind become the dust of all; may I abandon my egotistical intellect. One who eats and drinks countless delicacies is no more than a donkey, a beast of burden. In the Fear of God, is the Love of God. You live in a house of sand, but you still puff up your body - you ignorant fool!28. Raag Bhairao (156 KB) The Guru is Divine; the Guru is Inscrutable and Mysterious. Serving the Guru, the three worlds are known and understood. Without the True Word of the Shabad, you shall never be released, and your life shall be totally useless. The Yogis, the householders, the Pandits, the religious scholars, and the beggars in religious robes - they are all asleep in egotism. In this Dark Age of Kali Yuga, glorious greatness is obtained through the Lord's Name.29. Raag Basant (110 KB) Karma is the tree, the Lord's Name the branches, Dharmic faith the flowers, and spiritual wisdom the fruit. If the mind is not pure, what use is it to hold the breath at the Tenth Gate? If someone's soul is polluted within, what is the use of his traveling to sacred shrines of pilgrimage all over the world? This mind is released, only when it meets with the True Guru.30. Raag Saarang (203 KB) O my mind, chant the Name of the Lord, and study His Excellence. That poison which you believe to be your own - you must abandon it and leave it behind. What a load you have to carry on your head! Only the Word of the Holy Saint is eternal. Without the Name, everyone is poor. Hearing the Name, all supernatural spiritual powers are obtained, and wealth follows along.
    Water is the father of the world; in the end, water destroys it all.31. Raag Malaar (144 KB) Pain is the poison. The Lord's Name is the antidote. One who sings the Glorious Praises of the True Lord, merges in the True Lord. The Shabad is the Guru's Gift. It shall bring you lasting peace deep within; it shall always stand by you. O Pandit, O religious scholar, reflect on this in your mind. Why do you read so many other things, and carry such a heavy load? Those who follow the Guru's Teachings are the true spiritual warriors.32. Raag Kaanraa (94 KB) Meeting with the humble Saints, filth is washed away. My mind is the dust of the feet of the Saints. Whoever remembers his Guru, shall not suffer sorrow, even in dreams. Devotion is the natural quality of God's devotees. Blessed is that love, which is attuned to the Lord's Feet. He alone is liberated, O Nanak, whose True Guru is Good. The Sat Sangat, the True Congregation of the True Guru, is the school of the soul, where the Glorious Virtues of the Lord are studied.33. Raag Kalyaan When you serve the Lord, Death cannot even see you. It comes and falls at the feet of those who know the Lord. Those whom my Lord and Master protects - a balanced wisdom comes to their ears. That mortal being is supreme among all people, who is perfumed by the fragrance of the Lord's Name 34. Raag Prabhaatee (95 KB)Whoever the Lord blesses with forgiveness - his affairs are perfectly resolved. Your Name is the only cure; nothing else works, O Infinite Creator Lord. That body in which the Naam does not well up - that body becomes miserable. There is no sacred shrine equal to the Guru. The Guru encompasses the ocean of contentment. Both the singer and the listener are liberated, when, as Gurmukh, they drink in the Lord's Name, even for an instant.35. Raag Jaijaavantee You must understand that this wealth is just a dream. Why are you so proud? The empires of the earth are like walls of sand. Night and day, you listen to the Puraanas, but you do not understand them, you ignorant fool! Death has arrived; now where will you run?36. Shalok Sehskritee, First Mehl & Fifth Mehl If you know God and the nature of karma,
    you know that all these rituals and beliefs are useless. Says Nanak, meditate on the Lord with faith. Without the True Guru, no one finds the Way. The Righteous Judge of Dharma is relentless; he counts each and every breath. The mortal is beautiful and speaks sweet words, but in the farm of his heart, he harbors cruel vengeance. He pretends to bow in worship, but he is false. Beware of him, O friendly Saints37. Fifth Mehl, Gaat'haa Even if the mortal could reduce himself to the size of an atom, and shoot through the ethers, worlds and realms in the blink of an eye, O Nanak, without the Holy Saint, he shall not be saved. That palace is beautiful, in which the Kirtan of the Lord's Praises are sung. One's bad reputation is erased by a true son, who meditates in his heart on the Guru's Mantra38. Phunhay, Fifth Mehl The Lord is found in the Saadh Sangat, the Company of the Holy. I have seen all places, but none can compare to You. The eyes which do not see the Holy - those eyes are miserable.
    The ears which do not hear the Sound-current of the Naad - those ears might just as well be plugged. The tongue which does not chant the Naam ought to be cut out, bit by bit.39. Chaubolas, Fifth Mehl How long can the physicians go on, suggesting various therapies? You fool, remember the One Lord; only He shall be of use to you in the end.40. Shaloks Of Devotee Kabeer Jee. (50 KB) Kabeer, earrings made of gold and studded with jewels, look like burnt twigs, if the Name is not in the mind. Kabeer, rare is such a person, who remains dead while yet alive.Singing the Glorious Praises of the Lord, he is fearless. Kabeer, she came to me in various forms and disguises.
    My Guru saved me, and now she bows humbly to me. Kabeer, those who only preach to others - sand falls into their mouths.41. Shaloks Of Shaykh Fareed Jee Kabeer, the Brahmin may be the guru of the world, but he is not the Guru of the devotees.
    He rots and dies in the perplexities of the four Vedas. Fareed, do not turn around and strike those who strike you with their fists. Kiss their feet, and return to your own home. If you desire your Beloved, then do not break anyone's heart.42. Swaiyas From The Mouth Of The Great Fifth Mehl. (98 KB)Chant and vibrate the Name of the Lord, O Nanak, through the Teachings of the Saints. Meditate on the Lord with love in your soul. Lust, anger, egotism, jealousy and desire are eliminated by chanting the Name of the Lord. Those who serve Guru Amar Daas - their pains and poverty are taken away, far away. Glass is transformed into gold, listening to the Word of the Guru's Shabad.43. Shaloks In Addition To The Vaars. (63 KB)One who understands himself, meets with the Lord, and never dies again. If you wish to put out the fire, then look for water; without the Guru, the ocean of water is not found. Without the Shabad, everyone is dead. True love and affection are obtained from the Perfect Guru.44. Shalok, Ninth Mehl If you do not sing the Praises of the Lord, your life is rendered useless. Like a dream and a show, so is this world, you must know. None of this is true, O Nanak, without God.45. Mundaavanee, Fifth Mehl & Raag Maalaa I had looked upon the world as my own, but no one belongs to anyone else. Each Raga has five wives, and eight sons, who emit distinctive notes
     
  14. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    Hinduism and Sikhism have had a long and complex relationship. Views range from Sikhism being a distinct faith in itself to Sikhism being a sect of Hinduism. A vast majority of Sikhs oppose the notion that Sikhism is a sect of Hinduism, while others stress the similarities, but recognise that the religions are distinct.
    Main article: Hinduism and Sikh Panth
     
  15. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Sikh80 ji

    Your observation is true There are different points of view about Sikhism. Some do not think Sikhism is distinct from Hinduism; others argue this point.

    However, I read the article you linked to and two things about it. It has a strong bias and associates Hindu belief and Sikh belief wrongly. Also, the notice at the top of the page indicates that the article is may give skewed understanding of Sikhism; and the article is being debated on the Wikipedia site for that reason.

    So I would not take the article very much at face value.
     
  16. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    I can not reply to all the doubts. However, whether sikhism is a separate religion or not is answered by the Indian government which has not considered sikhism as a separate religion.It has been treated as an offshoot of hinduism only.

    Sikhs are not separate entity out here.It is just for information only.May be you already know this .
     
  17. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Yes Sikh80 ji,

    I have been tracking the view of the Indian government on this issue for some time. What can anyone say, if you are not an Indian citizen, that would make any sense at all? So I don't comment on this from the political side.

    But you don't have to live in India to understand how biased and skewed the arguments are. And some of the scholars, such as Trupp, only fan the fire of irritation. And he is neither Indian nor Sikh.

    Taken to its extreme this point of view advances "hindutsva" - hope I spelled that right-- which many Hindus also denounce. If we trace all of this back to the beginning, the reasons for considering Sikhism to be a sect of Hinduism, etc., the story is nothing but political. And we might not like the story once we hear it.
     
  18. Randip Singh

    Randip Singh
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  19. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    Replying To aad ji,
    Re: Sikhs in India

    The problem of sikhs being isolated from the mainstream is on account of apathy by the Government and fired by the lax attitude of SGPC is the culprit. If SGPC takes up the issue strongly, the Government will be required to lend year. In recent Deara issue the Punjab Government and the SGPC made it a point that Dear should be closed and the result is before us. For the time being the Dera under consideration is dormant with any prospects of becoming popular again.
     

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