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Being A Mystic Monist

MysticMonist

SPNer
Dec 19, 2017
8
6
37
Aman asked me to talk a little bit about my mystic background. Short answer is I grew up Christain and studied Lutheran theology in undergraduate then became Zen Buddhist then studied Hassidic Judaism then recently became Baha'i with an interest in Platonism.

That really doesn't describe me other than to say I'm indecisive and a serial convert!

I thought I'd share a story of one of the significant moments of my life when I first prayed in Hebrew. I was a Buddhist at the time. My teacher had recently passed away and I was adrift. My meditative practice had become a wreck and I was looking for some sort of magical practice or mantra to fix it. Now that I was without a teacher the guilt and doubt from leaving my childhood faith in God haunted me. It was difficult to meditate and moments of peace became more elusive. So I experimented with Pure Land Buddhism and some Hindu Shiva devotion. Still felt lost. Then I stumbled across an Hassidic Jew who taught me Shema (Hear oh Israel, the Lord is One, the Lord is your God). I remember praying that standing in my kitchen and I began to weep. It wasn't a mantra, it was alot more. I felt God's presence more clearly than anything before.

I studied Hassidic Judaism and soon found that peace I sought was right here and was a prayer away. I saw God's presence in all things. I ended up becoming frustrated with all the rules of Judaism. So I studied the Quran, one of my favorite texts. But I didn't mind much meaning in the trappings of Islam. Im now a Baha'i, but I don't know how much of the teachings I really believe.

But that fire for God still burns with me. I am a mystic and a monotheist before anything else. I love that we encounter God in prayer and He begins to live in our lives. I adore the many scripturers that contain His words. I read the first few lines of the Siri Guru Granath Sahib and loved it. I'm trying not to read it too fast, I want to rreally absorb it's wisdom.
 

chazSingh

Writer
SPNer
Feb 20, 2012
1,644
1,639
Aman asked me to talk a little bit about my mystic background. Short answer is I grew up Christain and studied Lutheran theology in undergraduate then became Zen Buddhist then studied Hassidic Judaism then recently became Baha'i with an interest in Platonism.

That really doesn't describe me other than to say I'm indecisive and a serial convert!

I thought I'd share a story of one of the significant moments of my life when I first prayed in Hebrew. I was a Buddhist at the time. My teacher had recently passed away and I was adrift. My meditative practice had become a wreck and I was looking for some sort of magical practice or mantra to fix it. Now that I was without a teacher the guilt and doubt from leaving my childhood faith in God haunted me. It was difficult to meditate and moments of peace became more elusive. So I experimented with Pure Land Buddhism and some Hindu Shiva devotion. Still felt lost. Then I stumbled across an Hassidic Jew who taught me Shema (Hear oh Israel, the Lord is One, the Lord is your God). I remember praying that standing in my kitchen and I began to weep. It wasn't a mantra, it was alot more. I felt God's presence more clearly than anything before.

I studied Hassidic Judaism and soon found that peace I sought was right here and was a prayer away. I saw God's presence in all things. I ended up becoming frustrated with all the rules of Judaism. So I studied the Quran, one of my favorite texts. But I didn't mind much meaning in the trappings of Islam. Im now a Baha'i, but I don't know how much of the teachings I really believe.

But that fire for God still burns with me. I am a mystic and a monotheist before anything else. I love that we encounter God in prayer and He begins to live in our lives. I adore the many scripturers that contain His words. I read the first few lines of the Siri Guru Granath Sahib and loved it. I'm trying not to read it too fast, I want to rreally absorb it's wisdom.
Hey, Great post....

As i did many years ago and still do now, enjoy and contemplate gurbani as much as possible... :)
pay extra attention to what it says about where you can experience God....real tangible experience like biting into an apple... :) then seek any guidance on how you can begin seeking in that location...and give it a try...you're own personal experiment.... :)
 

Sikhilove

Writer
SPNer
May 12, 2016
608
160
Aman asked me to talk a little bit about my mystic background. Short answer is I grew up Christain and studied Lutheran theology in undergraduate then became Zen Buddhist then studied Hassidic Judaism then recently became Baha'i with an interest in Platonism.

That really doesn't describe me other than to say I'm indecisive and a serial convert!

I thought I'd share a story of one of the significant moments of my life when I first prayed in Hebrew. I was a Buddhist at the time. My teacher had recently passed away and I was adrift. My meditative practice had become a wreck and I was looking for some sort of magical practice or mantra to fix it. Now that I was without a teacher the guilt and doubt from leaving my childhood faith in God haunted me. It was difficult to meditate and moments of peace became more elusive. So I experimented with Pure Land Buddhism and some Hindu Shiva devotion. Still felt lost. Then I stumbled across an Hassidic Jew who taught me Shema (Hear oh Israel, the Lord is One, the Lord is your God). I remember praying that standing in my kitchen and I began to weep. It wasn't a mantra, it was alot more. I felt God's presence more clearly than anything before.

I studied Hassidic Judaism and soon found that peace I sought was right here and was a prayer away. I saw God's presence in all things. I ended up becoming frustrated with all the rules of Judaism. So I studied the Quran, one of my favorite texts. But I didn't mind much meaning in the trappings of Islam. Im now a Baha'i, but I don't know how much of the teachings I really believe.

But that fire for God still burns with me. I am a mystic and a monotheist before anything else. I love that we encounter God in prayer and He begins to live in our lives. I adore the many scripturers that contain His words. I read the first few lines of the Siri Guru Granath Sahib and loved it. I'm trying not to read it too fast, I want to rreally absorb it's wisdom.
The reason there are so many similarities in religions is that Truth is One.

Sikhi is not a religion. A Sikh is a student of Truth.

Any Truth principle taught by any religion or person will resonate with a True student of Truth and devotee(bhagat).

Don't get it twisted, Guru Nanak said theres no Hindu and No Muslim, only One, meaning theres no religion, Only One God.

He can cannot be confined to a religion when Hes All Pervading.
 

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This deeply spiritual and divine shabd is composed by Guru Ramdas ji and is contained on page 1200 of the SGGS.


The literal translation of the first verse is: O Son, Why Do You Argue...

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