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Why am I sikh?

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by jaysangh, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. jaysangh

    jaysangh
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    (Before jumping into this I think it would be polite of me to state the overall theme of the following thread. I will not be discussing why I love sikhism or how I found sikhism. Instead I will be presenting some questions from a sketpical person with sikh parents.)

    Why am I a sikh? Why should I be? What proof is there that I should believe? Do I just need to have faith?

    These are questions I ask myself quite regularly. Maybe when I was a teenager if somebody asked me whether or not I was a sikh I would have said yes.

    However, these days I find it difficult to admit that I am a sikh. I don't go to the the temple on a regular basis (really only for special events and weddings). The times that I do go I don't really feel interested in getting involved with prayers and etc.

    One from here may quickly jump and wrongly accuse me of being ignorant of my own religion. My apathy towards sikhism doesn't result from poor parenting or lack of education. It likey stems from a few kids I met through my adolescence who asked me some questions, questions I had no answers to. Maybe you do, maybe you don't?

    Firstly, the title of this thread. Why am I sikh? Is there really a decent answer to that question. The only coherent answer I can think of is "because my parents are". But should a person really structure his/her belief system according to a viewpoint his/her parents held? What if the religion of a child's parents was corrupt and held very immoral beliefs. Should this child just blindly accept what he/she is told to believe?

    Now, I am not suggesting that sikhism is corrupt or immoral (I definitely would never say that). What I am trying to suggest is that the answer "because my parents are" is not valid.

    Let's take this question a bit further. If I was born into a hindu/christian/muslim family would I end up later in life finding sikhism and converting? I don't think I (or anyone) could say yes to that question with 100% certainty. Of course this is taking the question and twisting it into a completely impossible scenario. Children are merely a product of their parents (genetically). The hypothetical starting with "If I was born from different parents" is inherently flawed. If I had different parents I would no longer be me and therefore I cannot expect this other me to end up with the same system of beliefs as the real me.

    Now of course some may argue "well that's not true, we have souls which are capable of transcending space, time and matter" or something to that effect. I'd rather leave that line of argument out of this. The concept of souls (at least when using the conventional definition of the word) requires one to have faith in something that remains for the most part "unproven".

    So how about this scenario. Imagine a kid that was born from sikh parents. While the kid is very young (say...1-2 years old), the parents end up getting in some sort of accident and die (or decide to not be capable of raising the child and put him in an orphanage, whatever scenario you prefer). The child is put in a house until a loving hindu couple adopt the child. Treating the child as their own, they, of course, raise the child as a hindu. Once the child grows up he/she pursues a life as a devout hindu. He/she may never be aware that his original parents were sikhs.

    Now some ppl might argue that the kid was DESTINED to be a hindu. That this was just god's plan for him. What do you think?

    Back to my life though. These days I don't consider myself sikh. My personal belief system probably falls closer to an atheist than a sikh. I read here that sikhism isn't really a religion. However, whenever I read things about a belief system having a creator the word religion is immediately what I think. Can somebody possibly clear this up for me?

    That is all I have time for the moment. I look forward to publishing some more posts and hopefully hearing some intellectual responses. Until then...
     
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  3. skeptik

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    mate you're wasting your time. you're a sikh, accept it or not, but thats what you are. there is no point questioning it. its an obvious fact of reality.

    What if i were born a stool? Would I like people sitting on me? Would i have chosen sikhism later? Silly question because you know that you cant answer this sensibly. if you were born to another set of parents well mate that wouldnt be you, that would be someone else.

    Forget about this - choosing ones path bullshit. Its for phudus who have too much time on their hands. Ask instead, how can i be useful member of society? How can i contribute to the hapiness of my family? How can i be successful in my life? Things like that are more useful questions to ponder.

    Nonsense. You arent an atheist. Your a sikh who is too lazy to live as one. Just do it. Read your japji sahib, do your seva, take care of your family, and be a useful member of society. Work on the basics, thats the point.

    Nevermind what people say about Sikhism here. They are just too awed by liberalism interpretations of Sikhism to think Sikhi has nothing to do with ordinary society. They're wrong about this and if you are interested you can read a thread of mine on the other board where i discuss such misconceptions. As it happens, Sikhi is a religion. nevermind if it wasnt a religion when baba nanak lived - it has become one since then. Sikhs have a religious code, they have their history, they have their culture and they have their society. one cannot deny this.
     
  4. jaysangh

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    I'd have to say I disagree with you on some points

    Hmm, wasting my time? I don't see how questioning what belief system you are going to follow is at all a waste of time. The worst thing I think people can do is just blindly accept what they are told without questioning it

    Yah, I pointed out the flaw in my own argument in the original post..

    Firstly, I will admit those questions are also important but I wasn't really talking about chosing a path. I personally tend to reject concepts like fate and destiny. I don't see how people can really believe in it. THere is no proof or evidence that states that all our actions are controlled by some deity. Fate, come on ppl, give me a break

    Okay this little piece annoyed me. I am not an atheist? How can you even say something so bold without even knowing me. You read one little blurb I wrote in 10 minutes and think you can correct me on whether or not I am sikh. I am not too lazy to be a sikh. I would be a sikh if I thought that any of the teachings were at all necesary to be a moral, functioning adult. I have never been provided substantial proof that god even exists and if he does I have never been provided any reason to belief sikhism over any other religion.

    If you can provide any real factual evidence that shows me why you think I should be sikh (or heck even why you are a sikh) I might start reconsidering sikhism. I do not really want to hear "stop the nonsense, you are a sikh" or even "it's just something you have to believe".

    I think that most people these days don't have any real, tangible evidence that explains why they are religious in the first place and secondly why they subscribe to one religion over another
     
  5. skeptik

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    You reject them because people these days are so self obsessed and selfish that they cant see beyond themselves. Thats the main reason - forget about 'questioning beliefs' and things like that.

    Let me point out one important thing - you arent Guru Nanak - You arent Ramanand or Kabir or Naam Dev or any of those spiritual fellas. You're just another face in a sea of faces in the 21st century. They questioned and we should learn from what they taught. There is no need for every single person in our society to question everything, without a good reason. And no your reason isnt good enough - "The worst thing I think people can do is just blindly accept what they are told without questioning it" - its not the worst thing. I happen to think the Sikh faith is good enough that it doesnt need to be questioned every two seconds by every second Rahul who gets up on a 'But Guru Nanak Questioned' trip. Yes Guru Nanak did. No that doesnt mean you should do the same too. It doesnt follow at all that you should, just because he did. He also wrote Bani and started a new religion - are you going to do that too? He also travelled the world teaching people about his faith - are you going to do that? Imagine if everyone in our society did those things - who would do the work? Who would run the businesses, milk the cows, feed the kids, harvest the crops, write the books, run the races, paint the walls, marry the kids, etc.

    You dont believe in fate or destiny because you cant accept that there is a point to living, beyond your own amazing existence. you are so in love with yourself that you need a reason for not being so in love wiht yourself - and believing you are such an individuaul that you wont follow the grain, and do what others do. But no reason will be good enough to make you choose against being in love with yourself. No abstract God can do that. Fate and destiny constrain your precious individuality - which you love so much that you put it above the basics of your Sikh faith - which emphasises instead, the good of the community, and ones role in being a productive and useful member of your direct community.

    Sorry bro, but I know who you wrote very well because what you wrote is very familiar to me. Ive heard such things expressed a dozen times, and ive thought about these and on those thoughts myself. Their selfish and destructive. You arent an athieist, you only think that way because its romantic to be an Individual - to stand out of the crowd - but why should that be any better? You might convince yourselfg that you've thought yourself into that position but the truth is, you just took whatever others do, and reversed it. Your choice is just as arbitrary really as the original one. Basically you dont want to believe in a God because you already believe your the master of your destiny and you cant accept anyone else having power over you. You are your own God. But this is false, not because God exists and he has power over you - i dont know that, no more than you do. But because there are many people in the world who have power over you. Your president could have your arrested and sentenced to death for being a dodgy terrorist - a rich man could pay a bum to have your throat sliced. Another could buy your freedom by offering you millions and millions of dollars. Are you really that free - even just amongst mere morals? Think about it.

    You wouldnt be a Sikh? Thats news to me. You do know that not every Sikh is a revolutionary, anti establishmentarian, dont you? I mean the way you people think these days, you'd think those fools who become the Guru's Sikhs in those days were fools, for giving up their freedom and deciding to follow some Guru dude, even though if they really were good Sikhs they'd just sit there questioning everything. What a joke.

    You want proof? Are you f**king stupid? No one can prove to you why should believe something, no less believe a religion. I can give you good practical reasons but you really have to put down the 'me me me' attitude, that disgusting 'individuality' above all costs sickness and think about what im about to say:

    Do it because being a good Sikh means you are a good useful and respectable member of society. You will live your life in the rich tradition of the Sikhs, who have fought long and hard to keep their communities safe; who've cherished good society and always tried to keep it going, even through the most difficult times. If you can read the history of the SIkhs, and feel some affinity to those people and what they have achieved through selfnessless - and complete disregard for selfish notions of 'individualism' then you'll have learnt an important lesson. This by the way is somethign the Sikh faith can give you - that no other palatable faith can give you. Not liberalism - the biggest religion of the moment. Sikhi.

    None exists, stop looking for it or demanding it. If you are a member of the sikh community, you should be a useful and positive member of that community. If you question everything and anything in the community you'll just be a cynical bast**d who does little good, but finds plenty to complain about. Dont question just for the sake of questioning - question when there is a good reason.

    By the way if all of this is harsh, then yes it is, but i am not purposely trying to be cruel. I do want to help you, i just think you need to be shaken up into doubting the nonsense individualism that has taken hold over you.

    Consider in the past men gave their lives to a cause, they fought for principle, they lived to find a cure, to teach the young, to protect the weak, to die for their people. Even today, men and women work their lives to raise their kids in good circumstance. They suffer through the most difficult circumstances so their families can be safe and healthy and successful. These were not wastes. They did something for other people. We should not forget that we live amongst others, and we cant divorce the questions of 'faith and fate, and things like that' from the wider community that we are part of. Even family and friends if you arent concernred about someone you dont know and dont care about. Altrurism is not something to be dismissed away as a myth - its real and pervasive. The Sikhs believe in it. If you are a Sikh - believe in too - and make use of your precious intellect, ability and opportunities.
     
  6. bkd

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    ur karams were good in ur last life so u got to be a sikh and if u do good in this janam then u migh t be able to become a sant in ur next janam cool huh
     
  7. satwant

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    This is an absolute pathetic cry. You are just another sorry pain in place where the sun does not shine person who just dont want to go to temple, do your prayers and keep hair. You just want to be modern, smoke and look cool in front of the chicks.

    Now after many years of being lazy and sitting under your mother's skirt, you decide to ask "Why am I a Sikh"? All I can say is that answers are with you. Go to the gurudwara in the morning and meditate and read about the gurus and their sacrificies so that we all can have a faith called Sikhism. You are the type of person that no one should be your friend as one day you will question, are you really my friend or what is a friend? what a born loser

    Satwant
     
  8. muneet

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    Having sikh parents is like finding yourself on a road which you have to trust , leads to something worthwhile. Now you dont spend your time on the roadside thinking you should rather have been present on that yonder junction to be better placed or some other. (you could - if you felt that yonder road would better reach you to your destination. But in case of the journey to the center of your self every road (every faith) reaches there.
    Athism also exists on the "denial of theism"
     
  9. muneet

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    What you are going through - is quite usual in everyones life- you feel lost and confused. Modern life can make you that. But to realise the futility of life the elders say that one should visit a funeral or see patients in a hospital. Once you are convinced of your mortality and the fact that you have a limited time on this life and dont remember a thing before or or will later after death- you will bloody well search for a meaning for all this.
    Temple visiting is not important- guru says that the ultimate temple is your self- first the 'presence. has to be there for you to be spiritual. Are you there- no you are scattered outside.- with your feelings, possessions ( even ideas are possessions), relations, career, money etc.
     
  10. jaysangh

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    Well, I guess I have a lot to respond to.

    The unfortunate thing is that most of you guys have completely missed the point. Instead of taking this opportunity to offer advice you have instead resorted to personal attacks. Instead of presenting logical arguments you have decided to make assumptions of my character. I feel that I am partly to blame because I may not have done the best job relaying my message.

    I did not make my original post so I could spurt out random anti sikh garbage. I made that post so I could ask some questions. The same questions I talk to my parents about, people at the sikh temple, and officials from other churches. I am in pursuit of achieving a greater understanding of the world around me. I am not here to attack you or your beliefs. I am here to learn about what you believe and why. I came here full of questions seeking answers. I am seemingly leaving here with a handful of insults.

    From my understanding Sikhism teaches you to be mindful and respectful of other people’s beliefs. I am not seeing that here.

    With that preliminary topic discussed allow me to move on. It seems to me that most of you guys are trying to promote an attitude “you’re a sikh, just listen to what you are told, stop questioning things!” That type of attitude I think is very dangerous. The type of religion a person subscribes to lays out the foundation for how a person will live their life. It affects all of us at our very core and it is something that is in play in every decision we make throughout our entire adult life.

    It is quite evident that religion is a very important matter. Why is it that I am being asked to shut up and to stop thinking about it? The only reason I question my religion is because I am aware of its importance. Heck, I would rather question Sikhism and later find that it is truly a religion that aligns with my personal life philosophy and cherish it because I understand it rather than blindly follow the teachings.

    Now to discuss the horrendous personal attacks made by Satwant. For the record, I do not smoke, I respect my parents, I am attending university, and I am working while going to school to ensure my parents don’t end up with huge bills. On a daily basis I bus to school and work even though my parents offered to lend me a car. I do this because I care about the environment and because I’d rather not have my parents working hard to pay for my expenses. It troubles me how you so quickly assume that because I am questioning my faith that I am a freeloading, smoking teenager who only cares about picking up chicks. I sincerely hope you that in the future you are capable of looking past these stereotypes that are seemingly blinding you from the truth.

    I have the utmost respect for my parents and my immediate family. I respect my culture and my upbringing and I have not lost touch with my roots. I am still proud of who I am and the country my parents are from. Sihkism is the only aspect of my life that I am questioning. I am not rejecting it nor am I trying to sully it.

    Now, I shall go to some comments posted earlier by skeptik. I do not think that I am god, I do see myself as an individual in this world but that does not mean that I think that my wants and needs are more important than anybody else’s. I do not wish to discuss the concept of fate and why I do not believe in it. If you wish we may start another thread and discuss it at length but it is not pertinent to this topic. Discussing it here will only lead us on a tangent.

    I am annoyed, however, by the argument of “you are nothing compared to the guru’s stop questioning them, you may never understand their true intentions”. The argument that we are too stupid to understand entirely what god meant and therefore are in no position to question god isn’t much of an argument. It essentially throws you in a position where logic cannot defeat your argument. It accomplishes nothing except killing any potential for an intellectual debate.

    And again please don’t respond to this by saying “shut up and go to the gurdwara and listen to what they have to tell you”. That isn’t the answer. I have done that for many years and it is what has led me to where I am today. What a person would gain from the gurdwara mainly helps people that already believe in Sikhism moderately and are being troubled over small details. The concept of a deity, the concept of supernatural beings is really what is troubling me.

    Also please don’t tell me to give back to my community. By doing so you assume that I already don’t do that. I give back to my community plenty through volunteering (by “my community” I don’t just mean the sikh community, I refer to a larger community consisting of people from all religions and races).

    There is much more I can say, but I will leave it at this and wait for some responses. Additionally, I would like to ask that we stop the insulting. My intent is to encourage intellectual debate about Sikhism, Atheism, and other systems of beliefs. I am not here to bully anybody. If that is why you are here, then I recommend you not waste your time.
     
  11. Dimitri

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    I think you are on a right track or sort of very close. But you are asking way to many questions . Anyway.
    Why did Guru Nanak questions why should I wear Jenau (that thread brahmans wear). Why I can’t sleep with my feet facing that direction. Why should I through the water towards sun whereas my crops are on the other side.

    First of all have you ever thought what Akal, Waheguru or God is according to Sikhism. What is the Guru Granth philosophy about this creator of the whole universe. Now to go about understanding this you need to invest time in actually UNDERSTANDING Guru Granth.

    You are asking why I should believe in God, simply because its passed on to you. I don’t know how old you are but this creation, the endless universe, the diversity of creation on this planet, us sitting on it – do you think its all a chance. There is no entity, a creative energy or force behind it?
    Sikhism is only about 400-500yrs old. Do you think ppl in Punjab and other part of India who followed Gurus teachings were disillusioned or they had no idea, they probably weren’t intelligent. We living in our current age are better at understanding things as we can use computers, drive and do our jobs – if we loose electricity, or there is some natural/non natural disaster then we probably won’t even know how to go about surviving but that’s alrite, I think we know better. According to Guru Granth, what stops us from accepting/acknowledging that there is some force behind all this creation; the only thing that is stopping you is this I, in other words your humay, Your own Ahankar. Now that your are capable, big and strong you feel yup there is none of this God stuff. I Know, I am running my show. But what about when you were born, how capable were you then. Before you came out your nourishment was placed in front you, your sustenance was there when u had no capacity of your own – as in your mothers milk. Are you absolutely sure that there is no design behind this? What stops us from not believing is simply our Humay or “I ness” that is talked in Guru Granth. This concept of Humay is discussed big time in Guru Granth. In the end you have to make your own sense of it buddy. Its no point to get info from anybody else. I strongly urge to read about cosmology, biology and all other stuff mentioned in Guru Granth.

    “Lord has established his stocks and stores in many worlds. He has replenished them once and for all so that the supplies never run out” (GGS P7). I see none as great giver as you. O Great Giver; you give in charity to the beings of all the continents, worlds, solar system, nether regions and universe. (GGS P549).

    “having created the creation, He watches over it. By His glance of Grace, He bestows happiness. There are planets, solar systems and galaxies. If one speaks of them, there is no limit, no end. There are worlds upon worlds of his creation. As he commands so they exist. He watches over all and contemplating the creation, He rejoices. O nanak to describe this is as hard as stell’ (GGS P8).

    The fundamental building block of us, microbes, animals, whatever we see in universe are the same – atoms. Basically any matter that we see is combinations of atoms and molecules. At this moments millions of hydrogen bombs are going off on Sun to radiate energy and the same hydrogen is in us human body is 70, 50 or whatever percent water. H2O.

    ‘What ever is in the cosmos is also to be found within the matter. The enlightened can know this” (GGS P695). “Whatever is in the Universe is also in the matter. Only the researchers understand this” (GGS P695).
     
  12. max314

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    Sounds like something out of The Lord Of The Rings to me.

    To jaysangh:

    I admire your courage to step out of the comfort of your home ground and attempt to set out on a journey of self discovery. What end your journey comes to, or whether your journey even has an end, I wish you well.

    I will not say much on this matter, except this: God has given you your five senses, he has given you hands, a head and a heart. Every choice you make from now until the death of your human vessel is what you are destined to do.

    God is not a Sikkh, nor a Khalsa, nor a Muslim, nor a Hindu, nor a Jain, nor a Christian, nor a Jew. You may have been born into a particular family with a particular name and a particular 'religion', but you are not limited to what you were born into.

    You are limited only by the extent of your own courage, and by your divine destiny.

    Embrace your search for Truth, and you embrace God himself.
     
  13. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
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    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
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    I found this article to be of immense help on your discussions.

    Sikh basics and misconceptions
    Guide to a Sikh.
     
  14. Saim

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    I was researching Sikhism and I found this site.

    I would like to talk about the atheist POV.

    Atheists don't necessarily say that a god doesn't exist, they just say that there is no evidence for a god's existence, so we should assume that it (or he or she) doesn't exist.

    If you remain unconvinced read the God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. It is a very convincing book. It doesn't touch Sikhism (mostly focusing on Judaism, Christianity and Islam) but it does put forth arguments against god and religion in general.
     
  15. drkhalsa

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    Welcome Saim


    Although I am Learner ( Sikh) but I feel same for the Atheist point of view as you think
    that is for withist there is no god till he meet one ...right!?

    and that is ok as far as I am concerned

    Have a nice time here and do let us know more about your views

    Thanks

    Jatinder Singh
     
  16. Sinister

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    These will be the most honest answers that you will receive, so read carefully.

    Why am I a sikh?
    Your not

    Why should I be?
    You shouldn’t

    What proof is there that I should believe?
    None

    Do I just need to have faith?
    That won’t get you anywhere other than a superficial belief in rituals (and your smart enough to know that)



    Aside from your meandering lectures on “the unexamined life is not worth living” and ill developed questions, I think you’re right on track in your life.


    I look forward to publishing some more posts and hopefully hearing some intellectual responses.

    Sorry, in order to have an intellectual response you have to able to produce an intellectual question. Exactly what are you asking the members of this forum? You are asking questions that you already know the answers to!
    You are not the only one questioning the faith…at least come up with a developed question…synchronize your questions into one overarching thesis that covers a narrower sphere that a member can be discuss with impunity on a forum.

    But should a person really structure his/her belief system according to a viewpoint his/her parents held?

    Answer: NO

    I am in pursuit of achieving a greater understanding of the world around me.

    LOL good one. You keep at it. Ill praise you for this. I would recommend you stick to science if you truly are looking for “logic” in your explanations. Religion is more of a social and moral science thus is not always correlated to the stringent rules of nature. But as an intellectual shouldn't you already have this knowledge?

    It essentially throws you in a position where logic cannot defeat your argument.
    So why ask it? unless you are here to preach.

    If you can provide any real factual evidence that shows me why you think I should be sikh (or heck even why you are a sikh) I might start reconsidering sikhism. I do not really want to hear "stop the nonsense, you are a sikh" or even "it's just something you have to believe".

    why am I sikh: because i have tremendous respect for history.
    Talk to me and I will have some discourse with you. Maybe we’ll both learn something in the process.

    PS: Keep your posts shorter because they are really boring!
    And don’t listen to skeptik, he seems deranged as it is with all his profanities (where are the moderators on this forum?) :down:
     
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  17. Saim

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    Great point! There is nothing I dislike about religion more than the labeling children with their parent's religion (your (probably) not a child, of course, but you still are only Sikh because of your family).
     
  18. TGill

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    Bang on target
     
  19. amar7979

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    Jaysangh ji,

    With due respect to your thought process and no comments on that, i would like to share you my views as to why 'i' am a SIKH?

    Because I have not to worship and appease many Gods and a goddesses and seek the help of so many of them to meet my needs. Rather I depend upon one God who is Omnipresent and is with me where-so-ever I may be. I can meditate on His qualities any where, any time and on every occasion and my seeking His help is so simple and easy that it tempts me to be a Sikh. Because I need not go from door to door to seek guidance and advice. I have all guidance and advice incorporated in one and only one Holy Granth. Because practicing Sikhism is so simple - no complexities of rituals and ceremonies, fasts and austerities, renunciations and reclusions or heavens and hells.
    This simplicity of faith and freedom of joy are the greatest inducements for me to be a Sikh.

    Because it is not a faith to be practiced in the temples and living in seclusions. I have to practice it in daily life, behind the plough, on the roadside in the workshop and on the table. I have to be a Sikh at home, a Sikh abroad, a Sikh in society and a Sikh in battle field. I have to be a Sikh in thought, word and deed, a Sikh in my dealings with the world at large and a Sikh-like in all stations of life. Because I need no priestly order to redeem my sins. I am priest to myself. I can stand alone and pray to God for my redemption. He listens to my prayers. I have also full faith in a congregation of my people-devotees of my Guru. We sit together in the presence of our Guru-Holy Granth, sing in chorus hymns from the Granth till we are all one and in harmony with the Guru. We stand up then and pray with folded hands for redemption of our sins, for proper guidance in life and for His blessings for the entire mankind and the Universe. There I feel one with universe, a member of the human brother-hood and lie prostrate at His feet with all humbleness praying for the common good of all friends or foes.
    What a wonderful prayer! Hence I am a Sikh.

    Because Sikhism recognizes no caste or creed as high or low nor is there any colour, country or race bar. Its doors are open to the black and the white, to the western and the eastern and to the Negro and the American alike. There are no untouchables with the Sikhs. They run free community kitchens and call them Guru-Ka-Langar. Whosoever may contribute, the ration cooked in the Langar is considered to be that of the Guru. Theirs is only the service that they do in person. It is therefore that even the wealthiest among them and the persons commanding greatest respect male or female are seen cooking meals and cleaning utensils in the Guru-Ka-Langar, here all dine sitting in one and the same row (pangat) and partake of one and the same food regardless of the fact of one's descending from a royal lineage or having in hand a beggar's bowl or of being a Brahman or a Shudra, a Muslim, a Hindu, a *** or a Christian. Again they have common bathing tanks at Amritsar, Tarn Taran and a Baoli at Goindwal, constructed by the Gurus themselves where all are welcome to have a dip without the least distinction of caste or creed. When they join hands in congregational prayers, they place no bar on anybody may be of any nationality or profess any religion. It is this spirit of universal brotherhood, a commonwealth of man in Sikhism that appeals to me to be a Sikh.
    It is a life to be lived and not a tenet or a philosophy to be preached. It feels worthwhile to be a Sikh…
    ..SO I AM PROUD TO BE A SIKH!!
     
  20. TGill

    TGill
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    You would have written something different had you born to a hindu family ...:)
     
  21. amar7979

    amar7979
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    No idea on that Bro’ but all my non-Sikh friends do admire Sikhism for its uniqueness and values !
     

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