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When should you...

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Daniel, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Daniel

    Daniel
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    Guest

    Good morning,

    I know this is probably going to open a can of worm, but here goes...

    My question is when should I, as a developer who has taken over someone
    else's work, put in substantial time and efforts trying to clean up the
    previous developpers work?

    The db I am currently working on does not following naming convention and is
    a mess to work with.

    Typically, should I try and clean it up... Table structures and therefore
    forms and form coding... which also implies Reports... or do I simply
    ensure I do things properly moving forward?

    Thank you for your experience and insight on this issue,

    Daniel
     
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  3. Joseph Meehan

    Joseph Meehan
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    Guest

    Daniel wrote:
    > Good morning,
    >
    > I know this is probably going to open a can of worm, but here goes...
    >
    > My question is when should I, as a developer who has taken over
    > someone else's work, put in substantial time and efforts trying to
    > clean up the previous developpers work?
    >
    > The db I am currently working on does not following naming convention
    > and is a mess to work with.
    >
    > Typically, should I try and clean it up... Table structures and
    > therefore forms and form coding... which also implies Reports... or
    > do I simply ensure I do things properly moving forward?
    >
    > Thank you for your experience and insight on this issue,
    >
    > Daniel


    You should do it when you determine that you are going to end up
    spending more time on it because of the current situation than it will take
    you to fix it. Hint, you will likely underestimate both.

    Could you be working on some of my old databases? :)


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
  4. Daniel

    Daniel
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    Guest

    :) No this isn't one of yours!

    How do you explain the extensive time required to your boss who thinks every
    thing is a 2 minute job (and I'm not exagerating)?



    "Joseph Meehan" wrote:

    > Daniel wrote:
    > > Good morning,
    > >
    > > I know this is probably going to open a can of worm, but here goes...
    > >
    > > My question is when should I, as a developer who has taken over
    > > someone else's work, put in substantial time and efforts trying to
    > > clean up the previous developpers work?
    > >
    > > The db I am currently working on does not following naming convention
    > > and is a mess to work with.
    > >
    > > Typically, should I try and clean it up... Table structures and
    > > therefore forms and form coding... which also implies Reports... or
    > > do I simply ensure I do things properly moving forward?
    > >
    > > Thank you for your experience and insight on this issue,
    > >
    > > Daniel

    >
    > You should do it when you determine that you are going to end up
    > spending more time on it because of the current situation than it will take
    > you to fix it. Hint, you will likely underestimate both.
    >
    > Could you be working on some of my old databases? :)
    >
    >
    > --
    > Joseph Meehan
    >
    > Dia duit
    >
    >
    >
     
  5. Joseph Meehan

    Joseph Meehan
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Daniel wrote:
    > :) No this isn't one of yours!
    >
    > How do you explain the extensive time required to your boss who
    > thinks every thing is a 2 minute job (and I'm not exagerating)?


    I never had to. My boss could not find a Word file once he saved it.
    I often had to find it for him. Usually just using the find feature. In
    other words, computers were a mystery to him. 90% of the time I was free to
    find and work on jobs of my choice. I picked my own projects. I had a great
    job.


    >
    >
    >
    > "Joseph Meehan" wrote:
    >
    >> Daniel wrote:
    >>> Good morning,
    >>>
    >>> I know this is probably going to open a can of worm, but here
    >>> goes...
    >>>
    >>> My question is when should I, as a developer who has taken over
    >>> someone else's work, put in substantial time and efforts trying to
    >>> clean up the previous developpers work?
    >>>
    >>> The db I am currently working on does not following naming
    >>> convention and is a mess to work with.
    >>>
    >>> Typically, should I try and clean it up... Table structures and
    >>> therefore forms and form coding... which also implies Reports...
    >>> or do I simply ensure I do things properly moving forward?
    >>>
    >>> Thank you for your experience and insight on this issue,
    >>>
    >>> Daniel

    >>
    >> You should do it when you determine that you are going to end up
    >> spending more time on it because of the current situation than it
    >> will take you to fix it. Hint, you will likely underestimate both.
    >>
    >> Could you be working on some of my old databases? :)
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Joseph Meehan
    >>
    >> Dia duit


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
  6. Daniel

    Daniel
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Is your boss looking for new employees?

    Still looking for that type of work env. Thank you for the info about my
    original post. I think upgrading is required but I just don't know how to
    justify it to management.. They only understand money and in my case, my
    work costs them money... they don't see me as saving them money by automating
    processes and improving visibility... they only see me as a billable expense.

    Thanks once again... always interesting to get someone else's insight...



    "Joseph Meehan" wrote:

    > Daniel wrote:
    > > :) No this isn't one of yours!
    > >
    > > How do you explain the extensive time required to your boss who
    > > thinks every thing is a 2 minute job (and I'm not exagerating)?

    >
    > I never had to. My boss could not find a Word file once he saved it.
    > I often had to find it for him. Usually just using the find feature. In
    > other words, computers were a mystery to him. 90% of the time I was free to
    > find and work on jobs of my choice. I picked my own projects. I had a great
    > job.
    >
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Joseph Meehan" wrote:
    > >
    > >> Daniel wrote:
    > >>> Good morning,
    > >>>
    > >>> I know this is probably going to open a can of worm, but here
    > >>> goes...
    > >>>
    > >>> My question is when should I, as a developer who has taken over
    > >>> someone else's work, put in substantial time and efforts trying to
    > >>> clean up the previous developpers work?
    > >>>
    > >>> The db I am currently working on does not following naming
    > >>> convention and is a mess to work with.
    > >>>
    > >>> Typically, should I try and clean it up... Table structures and
    > >>> therefore forms and form coding... which also implies Reports...
    > >>> or do I simply ensure I do things properly moving forward?
    > >>>
    > >>> Thank you for your experience and insight on this issue,
    > >>>
    > >>> Daniel
    > >>
    > >> You should do it when you determine that you are going to end up
    > >> spending more time on it because of the current situation than it
    > >> will take you to fix it. Hint, you will likely underestimate both.
    > >>
    > >> Could you be working on some of my old databases? :)
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Joseph Meehan
    > >>
    > >> Dia duit

    >
    > --
    > Joseph Meehan
    >
    > Dia duit
    >
    >
    >
     
  7. Larry Linson

    Larry Linson
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    Guest

    Before you can fix something, you have to understand that something. In the
    world of database development (or other programs), that means you have to
    understand the requirements (what the user needs the application to do), the
    design (how the developer constructed the application to fill those user
    needs), and the implementation itself.

    Explain to your boss that the applications you corrected before were Ford
    Mustangs, Chrysler Town & Countrys, and Chevrolet Suburbans, but the
    application today is a Toyota Prius hybrid which is different from any of
    those, and you have to learn what a Prius should do, then compare with what
    it does, before you can even consider fixing it.

    It is possible that you may have inherited a well-documented, well-designed,
    and well-implemented Access database application, but they are rare (as are
    well-documented, well-designed, and well-implemented applications done in
    any other language). The sad part is that it may be difficult to determine
    that you need to start over on an application until you have invested much
    time and effort in trying to work with the existing one.

    One "red flag": If there are not written requirements that have been updated
    as changes were implemented, you are "in for trouble." An undocumented
    database itself can be understood with a considerable investment of time and
    effort; an undocumented design can be extracted from the database with
    another considerable investment of time and effort, but if you try to
    extract requirements from that design, you never know whether you got all of
    them, because you won't know whether the original developer actually
    satisfied all the requirements. So, you almost _have to_ go back to the
    users to determine what they need the software to do, whether it does it,
    and how well.

    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Access MVP

    "Daniel" <Daniel@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:B17BD4CC-6198-4E2C-819C-11F29B65F1ED@microsoft.com...
    > Good morning,
    >
    > I know this is probably going to open a can of worm, but here goes...
    >
    > My question is when should I, as a developer who has taken over someone
    > else's work, put in substantial time and efforts trying to clean up the
    > previous developpers work?
    >
    > The db I am currently working on does not following naming convention and
    > is
    > a mess to work with.
    >
    > Typically, should I try and clean it up... Table structures and therefore
    > forms and form coding... which also implies Reports... or do I simply
    > ensure I do things properly moving forward?
    >
    > Thank you for your experience and insight on this issue,
    >
    > Daniel
     

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