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What is Bhai Gurdas Jee's Key?

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by Archived_member2, Jan 3, 2008.

  1. Archived_member2

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    Pray Truth for all and say Satsriakaal!
    Dear all!

    Many preachers say that they have the key given by Bhai Gurdas Jee to understand Sri Guru Granth Sahib Jee.
    May I ask if Sikhs have now learnt to worship the key first and the true Guru later?


    Balbir Singh
     
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  3. Sikh80

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    Dear Balbir ji,
    When Bhai ji had presented The Vaaran to G Arjan Dev ji, it was then that Guru Sahib had said that the work was very useful and would be like a 'key' to the understanding Guru Granth Sahib ji.

    You would agree that the Bani is not simple and one can always take the help of Vaaran.
     
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  4. Archived_member2

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    Pray Truth for all and say Satsriakaal!
    Dear all and Sikh80 Jee!

    It is a blessing for seekers to have Satsang with true Sikhs on the spiritual path.

    Quote "When Bhai ji had presented The Vaaran to G Arjan Dev ji, it was then that Guru Sahib had said that the work was very useful and would be like a 'key' to the understanding Guru Granth Sahib ji."
    Please provide a reference when and where Guru Arjan Dev Jee has said so. I will be grateful.

    Quote "You would agree that the Bani is not simple and one can always take the help of Vaaran."
    Baanee is conformity to reality of Truth. Baanee is simple when one has tasted Truth.

    Who has come to know Naam Simran by writing and reading hundreds of articles about Naam Simran? Bhai Gurdas Jee's Baanee, in my observation, is misleading and represents other views than that from the true Gurus.

    Strange, avaricious preachers have marketed Bhai Gurdas Jee high to increase their profits. Their greed has placed his writings beside Sri Guru Granth Sahib Jee. Bhai Jee's writings are against the reverend Guru's statement though.


    Balbir Singh
     
  5. Sikh80

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    Balbir ji,
    Kindly do not make statements that are not as per the present edict. Bhai Gurdas ji's writings are held in reverence, I am not sure if these are approved bani or not but there is a clear cut verdict of SGPC on this.Kindly refer to those.
    Why do you unnecessarily write something that may not be seemingly palatable to the readers.?

    Anyways, choice has always been yours.
     
  6. Huck_Finn

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    i don't have any opinion on the topic right now
    but can i question the second part of the statement?

    "I am not sure if these are approved bani or not but there is a clear cut verdict of SGPC on this."

    SGPC - so let me remind you the backgroundf SGPC - it's a POLITICAL organization. You may like to call it quasi-political but it was fornmed with political motives and is political.

    now SGPC "defines" everything...SGPC gets "outraged", SGPC disallows publication of the bani, SGPC is interested in only "profit"

    so do i still listen to SGPC?
     
  7. Archived_member2

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    Pray Truth for all and say Satsriakaal!
    Dear all and Sikh80 Jee!

    Quote "When Bhai ji had presented The Vaaran to G Arjan Dev ji, it was then that Guru Sahib had said that the work was very useful and would be like a 'key' to the understanding Guru Granth Sahib ji."
    Why have you not provided any reference from Guru Arjan Dev Jee where Gurdev has said that?

    Quote "Kindly do not make statements that are not as per the present edict."
    I did not know that preachers have changed the Sikh edict.

    Quote "Bhai Gurdas ji's writings are held in reverence, I am not sure if these are approved bani or not but there is a clear cut verdict of SGPC on this.Kindly refer to those."
    O Really! Now they are for approving Bhai Gurdas Jee's writings as Baanee. Who are these unwitting who approve such titles?
    Please provide a link to the verdict of SGPC. I will be thankful.

    Quote "Why do you unnecessarily write something that may not be seemingly palatable to the readers.?"
    I do not agree that true Sikhi should develop acceptably to the taste or mind of ignorant.

    **************

    Bhai Gurdas Jee was the scribe to write Sri Guru Granth Sahib Jee. Secretly he wrote poems dreaming of the Guru-dom. His writings are not authentic either.
    Please ponder. Gurdev recited and Bhai Gurdas Jee wrote.

    Bhai Gurdas Jee wrote this in his Vaar 39-1-2.

    ਏਕੰਕਾਰੁ ਇਕਾਂਗ ਲਿਖਿ ਊੜਾ ਓਅੰਕਾਰੁ ਲਿਖਾਇਆ ।
    "aykankaaru ikaang|ikhi oorhaa oankaaru|ikhaaiaa|"

    Bhai Gurdas Jee is claiming in the above line that Gurdev asked him to write first 'aykankaaru ikaang' then 'oorhaa oankaaru'.

    Gurdev truly wrote <>.

    Bhai Gurdas Jee's statement is not correct, in my view.


    Balbir Singh
     
  8. Sikh80

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    kindly clarify.
     
  9. Sikh80

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    Other topics discussed by Bhai Gurdas in his Vaars
    Bhai Gurdas writes in praise of the Creator describing His attributes in the Gurbani, but does not give any Gurbani quotation. He discusses, the Guru and his disciples and creation of Panth of Gurmukhs. He eulogizes the Gurus, life being led by Guru-faced Sikhs, relation between the Guru and the Word, similarity between the Guru and the True Sikh and discusses in detail qualities of a Sikh. He describes the difference between the Guru-oriented - gurmukhs and self-oriented-manmukhs. He discusses the daily routine of gursikhs, their virtues and their conduct in the world in several Vaars.
    He discussed in detail Hinduism, Islam, their sects and beliefs without criticising or finding faults in them.
     
  10. Sikh80

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    He discusses the five evils of the human mind responsible for its degradation. In place of the five evil thoughts of lust, anger, greed, infatuation and ego, the Guru oriented or Gurmukhs, imbibe Truth, Contentment, Compassion, Duty and Fortitude. He praises the value of Sadh Sangat, or the Holy Congregation.
    He relates several stories from epics concerning Dhruv and Prahlad, Rajas Ambrik, Bal, Janak and Hari Chand; the episode of Draupdi; Krishna and Sudama; the story of Ahilya and Gautam Rishi; the conversion of Balmik from dacoit to saint; the liberation of Ajamal, Ganika and Pootna, the evil women.
    He praises the various Bhagats: Jaidev, Naam Dev, Trilocha, Dhanna, Beni, Kabir and Rama Nand and Sain, etc. He describes briefly the ten incarnations of Vishnu, and the stories of Mahadev (Shivji), Indra, Brahma, Narad and other Rishis. He mentions their ego in showing miracles.
    He discusses the division of four varnas and how these are clashing with one another. Only Gurmukhs are above caste, belonging to one caste; they are ever imbued with the love of the Lord. He describes evolution of human life as the Supreme Being among the 84-lakh species on this earth. Without True Guru (Satguru), man keeps groping in the dark, ever engrossed in the distraction of the world, like family relations, business, pilgrimages, holy baths, worship of gods and goddesses and charities.
    Listening to the Word of the Guru in the holy congregation (Sadh Sangat), the Gurmukh is ever attuned to the Lord, detached from the world like lotus in water. The Gurmukh loses ego, and ever accepts the Will of the Lord. Involved in the Creation and filled with lust, anger, opposition, greed, infatuation, deceit and ego, the manmukhs (self-oriented), go astray. Again and again, Bhai Gurdas praises gurmukhs, their humility and their ever remaining attuned to the Lord while earning their livelihood, serving the Sadh Sangat or holy congregation and doing good in return for evil. The gurmukhs are without ego and do not indulge in greed even in dreams
     
  11. Sikh80

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    Bhai Gurdas gives the names of the important Sikhs of the first six Gurus in the 11th Vaar:
    Sikhs of the First Guru: In Pauri 13-14 are enumerated 22 Sikhs of Guru Nanak. Some are identified by their castes and others by their profession. He only mentions that they were beloved of the Guru and were good Sikhs. He writes that Mardana was a good Rabab-player and has performed in all congregations, but does not mention the name of Bala among the Sikhs of Guru Nanak. Even earlier in the first Vaar Bhai Gurdas had only mentioned that Rababi Mardana was accompanying the "Akal Roop Baba Nanak" when Baba reached Baghdad. If Bala had been a prominent Sikh and had accompanied Guru Nanak during his travels then Bhai Gurdas must have known about it. We can justly conclude that there was no Sikh of Guru Nanak by the name of Bala, and that only Mardana was the constant companion of Guru Nanak during his journeys.
    Sikhs of the Second Guru: Pauri 15. Among the 12 Sikhs of Guru Angad enumerated here, Bhai Gurdas mentions that Jodh who was liberated, was the cook of the Guru.
    Sikhs of the Third Guru residing at Dalla: Pauri 16. Here Bhai Gurdas gives 25 names but only mentions that Pandha and Bulla were known as a singer and a writer of the Gurbani respectively.
    Sikhs of the Fourth Guru residing at Sabherwal: Pauri 17. Here, Bhai Gurdas just gives 21 names, but as before, does not mention any episode connected with any of them.
    Sikhs of the Fifth Guru: Pauris 18,19,20
    In the first list of 27 names is mentioned that Jhanju and Mukand were kirtanias.
    In the second life of 27 only Ram Das is mentioned as a cook and all are praised as Gurmukhs.
    In the third list of 16 Sikhs, some are identified by their subcaste. He does not mention that Goend of Ghai sub-caste was a highly respected beloved Sikh of the Guru. He, however, does not give any reason as to how and why he deserved this special praise.
    Sangat at Sultanpur: Pauri 21. Here are enumerated 20 names and, in the end, Bhai Gurdas mentions that Sultanpur is a ‘storehouse’ of Gursikhs. This indicates that he is monitoring the names of only prominent Sikhs.
    Important Masands of the Guru: Pauri 22. Here are mentioned names of 14 well-known Masands and Bhai Gurdas writes that they were all respected Gurmukhs.
    Very dear Sikhs of the Guru: Pauri 23. In this list Bhai Gurdas identifies 21 names by their sub-caste or their physical character and in addition states that each was better than the other.
    Well-known Sikhs of Punjab: Pauri 24. This list includes 14 names, identified by their caste or profession. Again no reason is mentioned to explain their prominence.
    Sangat of Lahore residing at Mozang: Pauri 25. Here again the 18 names are identified by their sub caste or profession and that they were all respected Gursikhs.
    Sikhs residing at far off places: Pauri 26. Here are given names of 15 Sikhs who were residing at Kabul, Kashmir, Sirhind, Thanesar and Fatehpur. Here, again, he does not mention any special detail about any individual Sikh or of the Sangat at those places.
    Sikhs of the Agra Congregation: Pauri 27. In this list are given 15 names and Bhai Gurdas remarks that all Gursikhs were stringed like the beads of the rosary.
    Sikhs of the Inner Circle: Pauri 28. Here are given names of 12 Gursikhs who were always in close company of the Fifth Guru. These Sikhs were always at the service of the congregation, but no details are given about any specified work they were doing.
    Sikhs of the Sixth Guru: Pauri 29-31. In the first list of Sikhs of the Sixth Guru are given 18 names only. In this list of 12 Sikhs mentioned, one was residing at Lashkar, another at Gwalior, one at Ujjain and one at Gujarat. He mentions that large number of Sikhs were residing at Burhanpur.
    In the third list of Sikhs of the Sixth Guru are 11 names and, among them, is mentioned one residing at Suhanda, one at Lucknow one at Parag, one at Jaunpur, one at Patna, one at Agra and one at Dhaka.
    These lists of Sikhs in the 11th Vaar tells us that by the time of Guru Hargobind Ji, Sikhs had spread out from Punjab to Kabul, Kashmir, central and eastern India (now Bangladesh). Bhai Gurdas, however, does not mention any activity, episode or happening among Sikh-Sangats of those places. He does not give any reason as to why he has not detailed any events, which he has witnessed during his lifetime. He only gives detailed exposition of living according to the teachings of Gurbani in his own words.
    Key or Chronicle? The remark of Guru Arjun Dev ji that Vaars of Bhai Gurdas "serve as a key to understand Gurbani" has been accepted by all of us. There is no doubt that the details of Sikhs of Guru Hargobind and his writing about Guru Hargobind confirm that several of his vaars were written during the life of Guru Hargobind ji, i.e. after the compilation of the Pothi Sahib.
    This hypothesis that the Gurus were not in favour of anybody writing about the worldly anecdotes, happenings in relation to the Gurus and the Sikhs held true even in the time of Guru Gobind Singhji. All of us accept that Guru Gobind Singh ji had a large number of scholars with him. None of them wrote about the details of martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur ji, or any details of the various battles forced upon Guru Gobind Singh ji. No one recorded the exact details of his last days and ascension. The scholars with Guru Gobind Singh ji wrote mostly stories from the epics and Puranas.
    The Vaars of Bhai Gurdas clearly indicate that Bhai Gurdas was fully conversant with -and proficient in - the art of history writing. This is borne out by his narration of only significant events from the life of Guru Nanak. There is no doubt that he was prevented from writing about the remarkable events concerning the Gurus and the Sikhs happening in front of him.
     
  12. Sikh80

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    Bhai Gurdas, the amanuensis, who inscribed the Adi Granth at the dictation of Guu Arjun was also the author of 39 vars (ballads in the heoric meter) in Punjabi and 556 kabits (couplets) in Braj language. These vars are of great historical and theological importance. The vars are regarded as the key to an understanding of the Sikh scriptures and Sikhism. They are the only really authentic references to the period of the third, fourth, fifth and the sixth Sikh Gurus by a Sikh. Bhai Gurdas’s commentary on Sikh practices is a valuable indication of the state of things at that time.
     
  13. Sikh80

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    Bhai Gurdas was born in Goindwal in 1551 AD. He was the son of Datar Chand, the younger brother of the third Sikh Guru Amar Das. The name Gurdas was given to him by Guru Amar Das and he took the child’s education into his own hands. Gurdas was quick to learn and soon became one of the chief exponents of the teachings of the Gurus. On the death of Guru Amar Das, the fourth Guru Ram Das formally initiated Gurdas into the faith and sent him to Agra as a missionary. On the death of Guru Ram Das, Gurdas returned to Amritsar and presented himself before Guru Ram Das’s successor - Guru Arjun. Gurdas was first engaged in trying to appease Prithi Chand, the Guru’s elder brother who had set himself as a rival guru and had launched a campaign of vilification against Guru Arjun. Bhai Gurdas failed in this mission. His var 36 on Prithi Chand’s attitude is fully of vituperation. Then Gurdas came back to Guru Arjun and turned his attention to purely academic pursuits. So Guru Arjun in 1603 AD, when he started the great task of compiling the Adi Granth, chose Gurdas as the scribe. The volume was completed in the summer of 1604 AD and was installed in the Hari Mandir, Amritsar.
     
  14. Sikh80

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    The Mughal Emperor Akbar, while passing through the Punjab desired to scrutinize the sacred volume and see for himself whether there was any truth in the allegation that it contained some references derogatory to Islam and the Prophet. Gurdas was entrusted with this mission of taking the Granth to the Emperor. The volume was opened at random three times, but none of the passages had anything offensive to Muslim susceptibilities. On the contrary, at least two passages echoed sentiments complimentary to the Islamic faith. Akbar made the offering of 51 gold mohars to the Holy Book and presented a pair of expensive Kashmiri Shawls to Gurdas.
     
  15. Sikh80

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    After the martyrdom of Guru Arjun and during the years of his successor Guru Hargobind, who was imprisoned in Gwalior fort, the affairs of the Sikh community were left in the hands of trusted followers among whom were Bhai Gurdas and Bhai Buddha.
    Tradition asserts that this Bhai Buddha was the disciple of the first Sikh Guru Nanak and lived from 1506 to 1631 AD. He died at Ramdaspur which is now called Amritsar. He was given the name Bhai Buddha, signifying a wise old man, by Guru Nanak, while still a boy. Bhai Buddha took part in the installation ceremony of the next five Gurus. He was the first Granthi of the Adi Granth. On Guru Hargobind’s release from Gwalior fort from prison on Diwali Day, which Sikhs call ‘Bandi Chhod Diwas’ as Guru Har Gobind, along with his own release, also got the release of 52 Hindu Rajas also imprisoned in the same fort by the Emperor Jehangir. Guru Har Gobind sent Gurdas to Kabul to buy horses as Guru Har Gobind, following the execution of his father, Guru Arjun, decided to arm his followers and then train them as soldiers. Before Gurdas could complete the deal to buy horses, the money was stolen from him and the crestfallen Gurdas, being unable to face his master, fled to Benaras. He was apprehended and was brought to Amritsar. Guru Har Gobind forgave him and Gurdas again resumed his duties as the chief organizer of the then scattered Sikh community. At this time, Guru Har Gobind’s militant ways and his close association with Muslims who had tormented his father Guru Arjun caused a certain amount of unrest in the Sikh community. Gurdas rose to his master’s defence. To him Guru Har Gobind was ‘the destroyer of enemy hordes, the hero of battles, the great warrior’ as well as ‘the great benefactor’.
     
  16. Sikh80

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    Gurdas remained celibate and passed away at Goindwal in 1629 AD. His funeral rites were performed by Guru Har Gobind himself.
    Bhai Gurdas did not set out to write a work of history, but there are several references, mostly in var 11 to persons and events which are of some importance to the historians of today. In the copies of Gurdas’ vars which are current today, there is the 40th var written by the Sindhi poet of Shikarpur of the same name. This Sindhi Gurdas lived in the time of Banda Bahadur (1670-1716 AD). His composition, though in the same meter as that used by the elder Gurdas is of the higher poetic quality and is frequently quoted in describing the mission of Guru Gobind Singh.


    http://www.sikhreview.org/september2007/heritage1.htm

    More to follow after the postings Of Veer balbir ji.
     
  17. Archived_member2

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    Pray Truth for all and say Satsriakaal!
    Dear all and Sikh80 Jee!

    Quote from Sikh80 (Post #7) of this thread "kindly clarify."
    Bhai Gurdas Jee wrote that he wrote as asked 'ooraa' 'Oankaar'. My curiosity is to know who asked him to write so. This was not Gurdev, in my view. Gurdev always wrote <> but never (1 Oankaar) 1 EAMkwr.

    Quote from Sikh80 (Post #8) Jee "Bhai Gurdas writes in praise of the Creator describing His attributes in the Gurbani, but does not give any Gurbani quotation."
    Strange, the true Gurus have also not mentioned him or his writings anywhere.
    Still, preachers try to convince Sikhs that his writings are the keys to understand Gurbaanee.

    Quote from Post #9 "He discusses the daily routine of gursikhs, their virtues and their conduct in the world in several Vaars."
    The virtues and activities of a true Sikh are but different in eyes from Gurdev than those described by Bhai Gurdas Jee.

    Quote from Post #10 "Sikhs of the First Guru: In Pauri 13-14 are enumerated 22 Sikhs of Guru Nanak. Some are identified by their castes and others by their profession."
    Gurdev realized God in everybody and identified him as God.
    Interesting, Bhai Gurdas Jee identified persons around Gurdev by their castes and profession.

    **************

    Dear Sikh80 Jee, all that you have referred are the excerpts from articles written by chorus line authors.
    Has someone found also something written about Bhai Gurdas Jee by the true Gurus?


    Balbir Singh
     
  18. Sikh80

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    Bhai Gurdas was scion of the family of Guru Amar Das ji, and contemporary of four Gurus, Guru Amar Das ji, Guru Ram Das Ji, Guru Arjun Devji and Guru Hargobind ji. He was born circa 1555 and died in 1629/1637 in the presence of Guru Hargobindji. He is accepted as a nephew of Guru Amar Das ji, and a maternal uncle of Guru Arjun Devji. Bhai Gurdas must have been hearing anecdotes from the lives of the Gurus and about the situation in Punjab at the advent of Guru Nanak. There was perhaps no written record about the life and times of Guru Nanak, but stories must have been going round by word of mouth.
    Poetry starts welling out from the mind at a young age. As soon as poetry started forming in his mind, he commenced writing about the story of the new emerging society whose foundation was laid by Guru Nanak. His sensitive mind quickly concluded that Guru Nanak had in fact organised a new "Nirmal (pure) Panth". This was an entirely new dispensation differing from all existing religions and sects. He studied the all-important existing religions and their interactions with one another to understand the reasons which lead Guru Nanak to embark upon the creation of a new path or movement. He considered it necessary to describe the practice of religion by the people when Guru Nanak came on the scene.
     
  19. Sikh80

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    Poetry starts welling out from the mind at a young age. As soon as poetry started forming in his mind, he commenced writing about the story of the new emerging society whose foundation was laid by Guru Nanak. His sensitive mind quickly concluded that Guru Nanak had in fact organised a new "Nirmal (pure) Panth". This was an entirely new dispensation differing from all existing religions and sects. He studied the all-important existing religions and their interactions with one another to understand the reasons which lead Guru Nanak to embark upon the creation of a new path or movement. He considered it necessary to describe the practice of religion by the people when Guru Nanak came on the scene.
    Historical Events mentioned in the first Vaar:
    Bhai Gurdas gives us a great insight into Guru Nanak in his first Vaar, which happens to be the longest one, with 49 pauris. He describes the Creation of the Universe and the beliefs accepted by the ancient Hindu mythology in the first 19 pauris. He makes his comments on the Creation of the Universe and the behaviour of humans. The all-pervading Onkar revealed Himself by his One Word and created the infinite Cosmos. Gurdas writes that it appears as if in His "One Hair" there are myriads of galaxies. In each world He revealed Himself in uncountable forms. He created the four Yugas, or ages, of this world. In the Satyug, Treta and Duapur Yug people lived for long years, but they did not construct palaces or temples. Dwelling briefly on the events of the Satyug, Treta and Duapur Yugas, Bhai Gurdas describes that in the present age of Kaliug the low instincts have come to the forefront. Ego and hate reign supreme. Everyone behaves according to his own whims, and is ever engrossed in his personal welfare. So long the Lord does not appear on the earth the True guru (Satguru), the mystery of the world cannot be understood. Bhai Gurdas does not find any difference between the True Guru and God. Satguru dispels the prevailing darkness. Kaliyug is the ocean of ignorance. Some worship stones, others worship graves, and some recite magical formulae and practise spells and charms. Hypocrisy is practiced at large. Different religious practices have cropped up. Some worship the moon, the sun; whilst others worship the earth and the sky. Some propitiate air, water and fire to appease Yama the god of Death. Mankind is immersed in delusions. Four Varnas, Ten orders of ascetics and twelve of Yogis have emerged. Naked Jains and other sadhus and mendicants have their own way of living. Many varieties of Brahmins commenced giving different expositions of religious philosophy by commenting on the Shastras, the Vedas and the Puranas. Mutual rivalries confused the public. In the twentieth pauri Bhai Gurdas describes the prevalent tenets of Islam. After Mohammad Sahib, 72 divisions appeared among Muslims. Pirs and Aulias propagated the rituals of Ramzan Rozas, Eid and Namaz. Temples were demolished and mosques erected in their place. Non-conformists were declared apostates (kafirs) and killed.
     
  20. Sikh80

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    Episode X
    Baba back to Kartarpur and giving charge to Guru Angad: 45
    Pauri 45.1 Jiarati kari Multan di phiri Kartarpure no aia.
    Pauri 45.4 Maria sika jagati vichi Nanak nirmal panth chalaia.
    Pauri 45.5 Thapia Lahina jivade guriai siri chhatr phiria.
    Pauri 45.6 Joti joti milaikai satigur Nanak rup vataia.
    Pauri 45.7 Lakhi na koi sakai acharaje acharai dikhaia.
    Pauri 45.8 Kai palati sarup banaia.
    Returning from Multan, Baba reached Kartarpur. Just like minting a new coin in the world, Nanak commenced a pure Panth (religion). While still alive, he appointed Lehna and spread the Canopy of Guruship over his head. Merging his own light with him, the True Guru Nanak just changed his body. No one could understand this strange happening. Nanak converted his "body" into a new form.
    When did Bhai Gurdas write his Vaars:
    Bhai Gurdas does not mention the fact himself. All of us have accepted the fact that Bhai Gurdas was the scribe of the Pothi Sahib or the first recension of Guru Granth Sahib, which was installed in the sanctum sanctorum of the newly constructed Darbar Sahib at Amritsar in 1604. It appears strange and not logical to state that Bhai Gurdas wrote his Vaars during the years 1610-1628 as stated by Dr. Sukhdial Singh. (Punjab da Itihas, Vol. 5 Guru Kaal 1469-1708, Punjabi University 2000 p. 40) This means that Bhai Gurdas became a poet in the last years of his life! There are three good reasons which point out that Bhai Gurdas wrote major portions of his famous poetry (Vaars) much before he was chosen to be the scribe of Pothi Sahib by Guru Arjun Dev Ji.
    1. Poetry is a born gift and it starts forming in the mind of the poets at a very young age, usually in the teens.
    2. Bhai Gurdas must have established himself as a known writer and poet before Guru Arjun Dev ji selected him for being the scribe of the holy Pothi Sahib.
    3. Bhai Gurdas was born about 20 years after Guru Nanak Dev ji had left this world. Bhai Gurdas selected only 10 important episodes from Guru’s life, which have a bearing on Sikh thought. He left out so many other prevalent anecdotes, which he considered unimportant. It is quite likely that some of them may have been uncovered much later. The story of Panja Sahib at Hasan Abdal is one such story. There is doubt that while returning from Baghdad Guru Nanak passed through this place and had met ‘Wali Kandhari’, a respected pir or "wali" of the place and the imprint of the hand on the stone is indeed that of Guru Nanak. The story of the "wali" throwing a big rock on the Guru Sahib from the hillstop is incredible. Guru Nanak may have met the "wali" by the side of the natural spring. "Wali" may have requested Guru Nanak to let his right palm imprint be sculptured on a rock to commemorate his visit and meeting him. It is most unlikely that the "wali" would hurl a rock on a "Haji" and ‘Akal Roop’ Baba Nanak. Even if Bhai Gurdas knew this episode as described above, his must have ignored it as of little importance.
     
  21. Sikh80

    Sikh80
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    Dear balbir ji,
    Kindly clarify further.
     

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