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What is an Automation object?

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by rg, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. rg

    rg
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    Guest

    I'm getting an error message that says, "The object doesn't contain the
    Automation object 'Content standard.'" It goes on to say, "You tried to run a
    Visual Basic procedure to set a property or method for an object. However,
    the component doesn't make the property or method available for Automation
    operators. Check the component's documentation for information on the
    properties and methods it makes available for Automation operators."

    Unfortunately, this is all greek to me. I can't find what an Automation
    object is, and I don't know what component it's talking about. Obviously I"m
    trying to do something that's not allowed, but I don't have enough knowledge
    to even find out what I'm not supposed to be doing.
    -rg
     
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  3. Douglas J Steele

    Douglas J Steele
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    Guest

    Automation usually refers to using objects from another application inside
    your application. For example, you can use Automation from within Access to
    work with a Word document or an Excel spreadsheet.

    What are you trying to do in your code? Post the relevant code, and indicate
    where the error is occurring, and someone will probably be able to help you.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no e-mails, please!)


    "rg" <rg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:6C535076-0EB7-4FBC-BD5D-1D3C68E0F03E@microsoft.com...
    > I'm getting an error message that says, "The object doesn't contain the
    > Automation object 'Content standard.'" It goes on to say, "You tried to

    run a
    > Visual Basic procedure to set a property or method for an object. However,
    > the component doesn't make the property or method available for Automation
    > operators. Check the component's documentation for information on the
    > properties and methods it makes available for Automation operators."
    >
    > Unfortunately, this is all greek to me. I can't find what an Automation
    > object is, and I don't know what component it's talking about. Obviously

    I"m
    > trying to do something that's not allowed, but I don't have enough

    knowledge
    > to even find out what I'm not supposed to be doing.
    > -rg
     
  4. rg

    rg
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Thanks for the information.
    I am trying to set the value of one field in a record based on the value of
    two other fields in the same record. I created a macro that has one action -
    SetValue. The Item is [Content standard]![ID], and Expression is [Content
    standard]![Strand ID] & "." & [Content standard]![Standard #]. I don't
    understand why Access thinks that my table name is an Automation object.
    There must be a better way to accomplish what I'm trying to do, any one with
    ideas? Thanks,
    rg

    "Douglas J Steele" wrote:

    > Automation usually refers to using objects from another application inside
    > your application. For example, you can use Automation from within Access to
    > work with a Word document or an Excel spreadsheet.
    >
    > What are you trying to do in your code? Post the relevant code, and indicate
    > where the error is occurring, and someone will probably be able to help you.
    >
    > --
    > Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > http://I.Am/DougSteele
    > (no e-mails, please!)
    >
    >
     
  5. Douglas J Steele

    Douglas J Steele
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    Guest

    There's no reason to store that computed value in your table. As fellow MVP
    John Vinson likes to say "Storing derived data such as this in your table
    accomplishes three things: it wastes disk space; it wastes time (almost any
    calculation will be MUCH faster than a disk fetch); and most importantly, it
    risks data corruption. If one of the underlying fields is subsequently
    edited, you will have data in your table WHICH IS WRONG, and no automatic
    way to detect that fact."

    Create a query with a computed field in it that concatenates the two fields.
    Use the query wherever you would otherwise use the table.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no e-mails, please!)


    "rg" <rg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:82D472ED-0B80-485D-9DA6-FC115D8B8F62@microsoft.com...
    > Thanks for the information.
    > I am trying to set the value of one field in a record based on the value

    of
    > two other fields in the same record. I created a macro that has one

    action -
    > SetValue. The Item is [Content standard]![ID], and Expression is [Content
    > standard]![Strand ID] & "." & [Content standard]![Standard #]. I don't
    > understand why Access thinks that my table name is an Automation object.
    > There must be a better way to accomplish what I'm trying to do, any one

    with
    > ideas? Thanks,
    > rg
    >
    > "Douglas J Steele" wrote:
    >
    > > Automation usually refers to using objects from another application

    inside
    > > your application. For example, you can use Automation from within Access

    to
    > > work with a Word document or an Excel spreadsheet.
    > >
    > > What are you trying to do in your code? Post the relevant code, and

    indicate
    > > where the error is occurring, and someone will probably be able to help

    you.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > > http://I.Am/DougSteele
    > > (no e-mails, please!)
    > >
    > >

    >
     
  6. rg

    rg
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    That's cool., I had found another message you wrote to someone else saying
    basically the same thing. The field had been used as a unique key and your
    other post said not to store the data, but to use more than one field for
    primary key, which is what I have now done. Thanks for your help, it's
    really appreciated.
    -rg

    "Douglas J Steele" wrote:

    > There's no reason to store that computed value in your table. As fellow MVP
    > John Vinson likes to say "Storing derived data such as this in your table
    > accomplishes three things: it wastes disk space; it wastes time (almost any
    > calculation will be MUCH faster than a disk fetch); and most importantly, it
    > risks data corruption. If one of the underlying fields is subsequently
    > edited, you will have data in your table WHICH IS WRONG, and no automatic
    > way to detect that fact."
    >
    > Create a query with a computed field in it that concatenates the two fields.
    > Use the query wherever you would otherwise use the table.
    >
    > --
    > Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > http://I.Am/DougSteele
    > (no e-mails, please!)
    >
    >
    > "rg" <rg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:82D472ED-0B80-485D-9DA6-FC115D8B8F62@microsoft.com...
    > > Thanks for the information.
    > > I am trying to set the value of one field in a record based on the value

    > of
    > > two other fields in the same record. I created a macro that has one

    > action -
    > > SetValue. The Item is [Content standard]![ID], and Expression is [Content
    > > standard]![Strand ID] & "." & [Content standard]![Standard #]. I don't
    > > understand why Access thinks that my table name is an Automation object.
    > > There must be a better way to accomplish what I'm trying to do, any one

    > with
    > > ideas? Thanks,
    > > rg
    > >
    > > "Douglas J Steele" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Automation usually refers to using objects from another application

    > inside
    > > > your application. For example, you can use Automation from within Access

    > to
    > > > work with a Word document or an Excel spreadsheet.
    > > >
    > > > What are you trying to do in your code? Post the relevant code, and

    > indicate
    > > > where the error is occurring, and someone will probably be able to help

    > you.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > > > http://I.Am/DougSteele
    > > > (no e-mails, please!)
    > > >
    > > >

    > >

    >
    >
    >
     

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