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Unmatched Query and Memo Field

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Robert, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Robert

    Robert
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I have created an unmatched query by using the wizard in Access 97.
    However, I find that it doesn't show the difference of a text field with
    size 255. Is it correct OR I have missed something ? Is it necessary for
    me to map the fields one by one (Actually, they are the same table but one
    is 1 month before) ?

    Moreover, one of the text field with size 255 is not sufficient and I will
    change it to Memo field. What is the difference between a text and memo
    field ?

    Thanks
     
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  3. Arvin Meyer [MVP]

    Arvin Meyer [MVP]
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Yes, you'll need to map dissimilar named fields individually. You cannot map
    a text field to a memo field. The difference is that a text field stores the
    data in the same table and has a limit of 255 characters; a memo field
    stored the data in another location and has a limit of 64K (or 1 GB when
    entering data programmatically). Text fields can be indexed and sorted, memo
    fields cannot.
    --
    Arvin Meyer, MCP, MVP
    Microsoft Access
    Free Access downloads
    http://www.datastrat.com
    http://www.mvps.org/access

    "Robert" <Robert@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:#Q#EIW1cGHA.4224@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > I have created an unmatched query by using the wizard in Access 97.
    > However, I find that it doesn't show the difference of a text field with
    > size 255. Is it correct OR I have missed something ? Is it necessary for
    > me to map the fields one by one (Actually, they are the same table but one
    > is 1 month before) ?
    >
    > Moreover, one of the text field with size 255 is not sufficient and I will
    > change it to Memo field. What is the difference between a text and memo
    > field ?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
     
  4. Douglas J Steele

    Douglas J Steele
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    If you're trying to compare records, yes, you need to map the fields one by
    one.

    Regarding Memo fields vs. Text fields, from the Help file:

    "Use a Text data type to store data such as names, addresses, and any
    numbers that do not require calculations, such as phone numbers, part
    numbers, or postal codes. A Text field can store up to 255 characters, but
    the default field size is 50 characters. To control the maximum number of
    characters that can be entered in a Text field, set the FieldSize property.

    "Use the Memo data type if you need to store more than 255 characters. A
    Memo field can store up to 64,000 characters. Memo fields can't be indexed
    or sorted. If you want to store formatted text or long documents, you should
    create an OLE field instead of a Memo field."

    What it doesn't mention is that you can't create indexes on Memo fields.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no e-mails, please!)


    "Robert" <Robert@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Q%23EIW1cGHA.4224@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > I have created an unmatched query by using the wizard in Access 97.
    > However, I find that it doesn't show the difference of a text field with
    > size 255. Is it correct OR I have missed something ? Is it necessary for
    > me to map the fields one by one (Actually, they are the same table but one
    > is 1 month before) ?
    >
    > Moreover, one of the text field with size 255 is not sufficient and I will
    > change it to Memo field. What is the difference between a text and memo
    > field ?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
     
  5. Robert

    Robert
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Dear Arvin,

    Thank you for your advice.

    However, as mentioned in previously, both of the tables structure are
    exactly the same. There is no dissimilar named fields to match. It is
    strange for the query not returning the unmatched rows.

    Since the comment > 255 characters, I think that the only way is to use a
    memo field (Maybe of size 400 characters). I believe that the memo field is
    stored in the same table OR there is a linked table stored the memo field ?

    Robert

    "Arvin Meyer [MVP]" <a@m.com> wrote in message
    news:OgtA9$1cGHA.536@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > Yes, you'll need to map dissimilar named fields individually. You cannot
    > map
    > a text field to a memo field. The difference is that a text field stores
    > the
    > data in the same table and has a limit of 255 characters; a memo field
    > stored the data in another location and has a limit of 64K (or 1 GB when
    > entering data programmatically). Text fields can be indexed and sorted,
    > memo
    > fields cannot.
    > --
    > Arvin Meyer, MCP, MVP
    > Microsoft Access
    > Free Access downloads
    > http://www.datastrat.com
    > http://www.mvps.org/access
    >
    > "Robert" <Robert@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:#Q#EIW1cGHA.4224@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    >> I have created an unmatched query by using the wizard in Access 97.
    >> However, I find that it doesn't show the difference of a text field with
    >> size 255. Is it correct OR I have missed something ? Is it necessary
    >> for
    >> me to map the fields one by one (Actually, they are the same table but
    >> one
    >> is 1 month before) ?
    >>
    >> Moreover, one of the text field with size 255 is not sufficient and I
    >> will
    >> change it to Memo field. What is the difference between a text and memo
    >> field ?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
  6. Arvin Meyer [MVP]

    Arvin Meyer [MVP]
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    The memo data is displayed in the same table but not stored there. Instead,
    a 14 byte pointer is actually stored in the table. In the event that the
    actual data stored in the memo field is less than 14 bytes, it is possible
    to store it in the table, but usually it's the pointer that's stored.
    --
    Arvin Meyer, MCP, MVP
    Microsoft Access
    Free Access downloads
    http://www.datastrat.com
    http://www.mvps.org/access

    "Robert" <Robert@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:#3j3jUCdGHA.5116@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Dear Arvin,
    >
    > Thank you for your advice.
    >
    > However, as mentioned in previously, both of the tables structure are
    > exactly the same. There is no dissimilar named fields to match. It is
    > strange for the query not returning the unmatched rows.
    >
    > Since the comment > 255 characters, I think that the only way is to use a
    > memo field (Maybe of size 400 characters). I believe that the memo field

    is
    > stored in the same table OR there is a linked table stored the memo field

    ?
    >
    > Robert
    >
    > "Arvin Meyer [MVP]" <a@m.com> wrote in message
    > news:OgtA9$1cGHA.536@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > > Yes, you'll need to map dissimilar named fields individually. You cannot
    > > map
    > > a text field to a memo field. The difference is that a text field stores
    > > the
    > > data in the same table and has a limit of 255 characters; a memo field
    > > stored the data in another location and has a limit of 64K (or 1 GB when
    > > entering data programmatically). Text fields can be indexed and sorted,
    > > memo
    > > fields cannot.
    > > --
    > > Arvin Meyer, MCP, MVP
    > > Microsoft Access
    > > Free Access downloads
    > > http://www.datastrat.com
    > > http://www.mvps.org/access
    > >
    > > "Robert" <Robert@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:#Q#EIW1cGHA.4224@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > >> I have created an unmatched query by using the wizard in Access 97.
    > >> However, I find that it doesn't show the difference of a text field

    with
    > >> size 255. Is it correct OR I have missed something ? Is it necessary
    > >> for
    > >> me to map the fields one by one (Actually, they are the same table but
    > >> one
    > >> is 1 month before) ?
    > >>
    > >> Moreover, one of the text field with size 255 is not sufficient and I
    > >> will
    > >> change it to Memo field. What is the difference between a text and

    memo
    > >> field ?
    > >>
    > >> Thanks
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  7. Robert

    Robert
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Dear Arvin,

    Thank you for your advice.
    I would like to know
    1) In my case, if I change the CHAR field to MEMO with 400 characters, will
    the data be stored in the table ?
    2) If NOT, I believe that it still stored in the database ? This is because
    I have to send the database to someone in another company.

    Thanking you in anticipation.

    Robert

    "Arvin Meyer [MVP]" <a@m.com> wrote in message
    news:uyPrkJOdGHA.3632@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > The memo data is displayed in the same table but not stored there.
    > Instead,
    > a 14 byte pointer is actually stored in the table. In the event that the
    > actual data stored in the memo field is less than 14 bytes, it is possible
    > to store it in the table, but usually it's the pointer that's stored.
    > --
    > Arvin Meyer, MCP, MVP
    > Microsoft Access
    > Free Access downloads
    > http://www.datastrat.com
    > http://www.mvps.org/access
    >
    > "Robert" <Robert@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:#3j3jUCdGHA.5116@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    >> Dear Arvin,
    >>
    >> Thank you for your advice.
    >>
    >> However, as mentioned in previously, both of the tables structure are
    >> exactly the same. There is no dissimilar named fields to match. It is
    >> strange for the query not returning the unmatched rows.
    >>
    >> Since the comment > 255 characters, I think that the only way is to use a
    >> memo field (Maybe of size 400 characters). I believe that the memo field

    > is
    >> stored in the same table OR there is a linked table stored the memo field

    > ?
    >>
    >> Robert
    >>
    >> "Arvin Meyer [MVP]" <a@m.com> wrote in message
    >> news:OgtA9$1cGHA.536@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> > Yes, you'll need to map dissimilar named fields individually. You
    >> > cannot
    >> > map
    >> > a text field to a memo field. The difference is that a text field
    >> > stores
    >> > the
    >> > data in the same table and has a limit of 255 characters; a memo field
    >> > stored the data in another location and has a limit of 64K (or 1 GB
    >> > when
    >> > entering data programmatically). Text fields can be indexed and sorted,
    >> > memo
    >> > fields cannot.
    >> > --
    >> > Arvin Meyer, MCP, MVP
    >> > Microsoft Access
    >> > Free Access downloads
    >> > http://www.datastrat.com
    >> > http://www.mvps.org/access
    >> >
    >> > "Robert" <Robert@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> > news:#Q#EIW1cGHA.4224@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    >> >> I have created an unmatched query by using the wizard in Access 97.
    >> >> However, I find that it doesn't show the difference of a text field

    > with
    >> >> size 255. Is it correct OR I have missed something ? Is it necessary
    >> >> for
    >> >> me to map the fields one by one (Actually, they are the same table but
    >> >> one
    >> >> is 1 month before) ?
    >> >>
    >> >> Moreover, one of the text field with size 255 is not sufficient and I
    >> >> will
    >> >> change it to Memo field. What is the difference between a text and

    > memo
    >> >> field ?
    >> >>
    >> >> Thanks
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     

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