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'Understand the concept of storing data in a structured format'

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by pbnw07619, Nov 10, 2005.

  1. pbnw07619

    pbnw07619
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    I want to explain the above to 16-18 year old students with basic knowledge
    of Access
     
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  3. Rick B

    Rick B
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    Okay. Do you have a question for us?

    If you are teaching a class on database design, I'd think that you would
    have books that explain the concepts. Or, you can search for hundreds of
    pages on the Internet that talk about it.

    What do you need from us? Are you looking for a specific story or example?


    --
    Rick B



    "pbnw07619" <pbnw07619@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:793EFC9A-6E51-4EBC-8882-1F722FBC23DA@microsoft.com...
    >I want to explain the above to 16-18 year old students with basic knowledge
    > of Access
     
  4. Albert D.Kallal

    Albert D.Kallal
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    Guest

    "pbnw07619" <pbnw07619@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:793EFC9A-6E51-4EBC-8882-1F722FBC23DA@microsoft.com...
    >I want to explain the above to 16-18 year old students with basic knowledge
    > of Access


    Hum, no structure vs. structure?

    Simply take a piece of paper, and have people write down their name, phone
    number, and address.

    Now, given then a 2nd piece of paper with a NICE CLEAR FORM with boxes on
    it, and then ask them to write down their names, and address.

    In one case, you got a mess of text like you would in a word processor.

    in the 2nd case, you got a clear defined structure, and the users are
    "forced" to put down the data into a structure. It is this forcing of
    structure that gives the data value. Anyone can ALWAYS look at the SAME spot
    on the paper to get the name, and with blank paper, this is not the case....

    So, that blank paper vs a nice clear paper form is like comparing word to
    ms-access.

    --
    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    pleaseNOOSpamKallal@msn.com
    http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
     
  5. Smartin

    Smartin
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    Guest

    pbnw07619 wrote:
    > I want to explain the above to 16-18 year old students with basic knowledge
    > of Access


    I really like Albert's suggestion.

    You may also want to Google for things like "relational database design"
    for more ideas.

    --
    Smartin
     
  6. pbnw07619

    pbnw07619
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    Guest

    Re: 'Understand the concept of storing data in a structured format

    Hi thanks for your response. Yes I was looking for a specific explanation
    from someone. I have looked on the internet and I have various handouts which
    I didn't think explained it very well. I have put something together, and in
    the meantime if I come across a better explanation I will revise my own notes.

    "Rick B" wrote:

    > Okay. Do you have a question for us?
    >
    > If you are teaching a class on database design, I'd think that you would
    > have books that explain the concepts. Or, you can search for hundreds of
    > pages on the Internet that talk about it.
    >
    > What do you need from us? Are you looking for a specific story or example?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Rick B
    >
    >
    >
    > "pbnw07619" <pbnw07619@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:793EFC9A-6E51-4EBC-8882-1F722FBC23DA@microsoft.com...
    > >I want to explain the above to 16-18 year old students with basic knowledge
    > > of Access

    >
    >
    >
     
  7. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews
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    Guest

    "Albert D.Kallal" <PleaseNOOOsPAMmkallal@msn.com> wrote:

    >Hum, no structure vs. structure?
    >
    >Simply take a piece of paper, and have people write down their name, phone
    >number, and address.
    >
    >Now, given then a 2nd piece of paper with a NICE CLEAR FORM with boxes on
    >it, and then ask them to write down their names, and address.
    >
    >In one case, you got a mess of text like you would in a word processor.
    >
    >in the 2nd case, you got a clear defined structure, and the users are
    >"forced" to put down the data into a structure. It is this forcing of
    >structure that gives the data value. Anyone can ALWAYS look at the SAME spot
    >on the paper to get the name, and with blank paper, this is not the case....
    >
    >So, that blank paper vs a nice clear paper form is like comparing word to
    >ms-access.


    Albert

    Well done. Very nice analogy.

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
  8. pbnw07619

    pbnw07619
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Re: 'Understand the concept of storing data in a structured format

    "Albert D.Kallal" wrote:

    > "pbnw07619" <pbnw07619@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:793EFC9A-6E51-4EBC-8882-1F722FBC23DA@microsoft.com...
    > >I want to explain the above to 16-18 year old students with basic knowledge
    > > of Access

    >
    > Hum, no structure vs. structure?
    >
    > Simply take a piece of paper, and have people write down their name, phone
    > number, and address.
    >
    > Now, given then a 2nd piece of paper with a NICE CLEAR FORM with boxes on
    > it, and then ask them to write down their names, and address.
    >
    > In one case, you got a mess of text like you would in a word processor.
    >
    > in the 2nd case, you got a clear defined structure, and the users are
    > "forced" to put down the data into a structure. It is this forcing of
    > structure that gives the data value. Anyone can ALWAYS look at the SAME spot
    > on the paper to get the name, and with blank paper, this is not the case....
    >
    > So, that blank paper vs a nice clear paper form is like comparing word to
    > ms-access.
    >
    > --
    > Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
    > Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    > pleaseNOOSpamKallal@msn.com
    > http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
    >
    >
    > Hi Albert


    Thanks for your reply. I am sure you are on the right track as you address
    the question of 'understanding the concept'. The example I used was a filing
    system in a Doctors surgery with records kept in alphabetical order and you
    had to search for a patient named Brown. A database could do it in a second.
    However I think your example better. Thanks
     

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