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The Reptilians and Sikhism

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by Admin Singh, Aug 30, 2009.

  1. Admin Singh

    Admin Singh
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    Gurfateh ji, well, just found this interesting piece of writing whilte surfing the internet, thought it makes an interesting reading and some food of thought... should help us in dealing with such kind of questions...

    Hello everyone,

    Some facts about the Sikhism, Sikh history, and the Sikh people:

    Of all the religions in this world, Sikhism has to be the most fair and logical. If you don’t believe me, study it and compare it to all other religions. You’ll see that the unlike Hindusim, Sikhism doesn’t teach people to discriminate against people of different social groups or women. Unlike Christianity, Sikhism doesn’t tell people to remain non-violent even if a great injustice is done. Unlike Islam, Sikhism doesn’t tell people to forcibly convert others, or kill them if they refuse convert. Unlike Buddhism, Sikhism doesn’t tell people to give up a householders life and wander in forests. So it’s the most wonderful religion. But is this perfect religion from God or from the reptilians like all the other major religions are? If this is religion is from God, then I beg dearly for forgiveness. But if this religion is from the reptilians, then they created the most perfect religion only to fight the Islamification of India, centuries ago. The reptilians were behind the Mughal Jihad in the first place, but they had to stop the Jihad at a certain time (through human bloodshed, of course), because their plans had to move to another stage - the coming of the British.

    I mean no disrespect to the Sikh community, but it would be a sin not to investigate what we are taught. ‘Sikh’ means ’Learn’. So it’s every Sikh’s religious duty to learn what the truth really is, rather than be blindly loyal to some path they are told to follow. Sikhs should remember that this is what the Sikh gurus taught, and the gurus constantly accused Hindus and Muslims of being ignorant and blindly practicing pointless customs and rituals. If any Sikh is angered by this, then he or she is being ignorant, which is un-Sikh. So let us examine the facts and establish the truth:

    1) All the Sikh gurus belonged to the Kshatriya caste (one of the four main Hindu social classes). But it must be pointed out the gurus were firmly against casteism. Being Kshatriyas meant they were Aryans. All the founders of the major world religions seemed to be Aryans -- Buddha (founder of Buddhism), Maha-veer (founder of Jainism), Zoroaster (founder of Zoroastrianism), etc. Mr Icke’s books explain the special link between the Aryan race and the reptilians. Guru Nanak was once shielded from the scorching sun by the hood of a large serpent. Many people witnessed it. People should note that no low-caste man or female was the founder of a major religion. Are they not worthy to become messengers of God? Do they have to have certain DNA???

    2) All gurus except, I believe Guru Nanak, were related. However, I might be wrong and maybe all the gurus shared the same blood. But from the fourth guru to the tenth, I believe it was a father-to-son succession. The tenth guru wrote an autobiography, which he entitled ‘Bachittar Natak’. It can be found in the Shri Dasam Granth Sahib. According to it, all the Sikh gurus are descendants of Luv and Kush, the two sons of the Lord Rama, who Hindus consider to be an incarnation of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. According to Mr Icke’s writings, all the monarchs, major political leaders, and so-called ‘prophets’ (at least, the ones that existed) were related. Barack Obama has Aryan genes in his blood, which he got from his white mother. There was even a story on a US news programme about how Obama ’turns-out’ to be a distant relative of US presidents, and the report was presented in a joyful way. The media always laughs off these serious facts. But it’s not coincidental and certainly not funny. This is serious and proves that Obama was not democratically elected. And by the way, he’s America’s first half-caste president, not first black president. If it was Credo Mutwa, the truly enlightened Zulu warrior priest, and the most wonderful man alive, then you could call him a black president.

    3) Baba Buddha ji (no, not that Buddha) was an old man (Buddha means ‘old’ in Punjabi) who gained wisdom from Guru Nanak (born AD 1469), the first guru of Sikhism. He out-lived the first guru, and then the second guru, and then the third, the fourth, the fifth, and then hanged around with the sixth. He anointed them (I believe starting with the 2nd guru) in the guru-initiation ceremony (anointing the forehead represents the reptilian third eye?). He died at the age of 125 (AD 1506- 1631). Another long lifer was Baba Sri Chand. He was one of two sons of Guru Nanak who chose the life of an ascetic and did not follow the exact same teachings as his father, which meant he couldn’t have gone on to becoming his father‘s successor. Sri Chand was born in AD 1494 and died AD 1643 (aged 149). According to The Reptilian Agenda, Credo Mutwa says that if a person’s mind is channelled at a certain frequency, the reptilians reward them with a long life.

    4) Traditional Sikhs wear turbans. They use a turban to cover their long hair which the Sikh gurus told them to keep. Credo Mutwa states in the Reptilian Agenda, that throughout history, crowns and turbans have been worn by monarchs and religious leaders to imitate the large heads of reptilians/greys. Sikhs have worn turbans since the days of Guru Nanak. In statues and painting/pictures, the Hindu god Shiva is shown with a large heap of dreadlocks on his head. A sect of warrior Sikhs, known as the ‘Akali Nihang’, imitate the Shiva hair-do by wearing a large blue conical turban, called a ‘Dastar Bunga’. And they even adorn it with small iron weapons of war.

    5) One of the two main symbols of the Sikhs is called a ‘Khanda’ (the Khanda is actually the name of one of the types of swords included in the symbol). The Khanda is in the middle, then you have two curved swords crossing each other, and a discus in the centre. According to Mr Icke’s writings, the trident head is an important symbol of secret societies. The god Roman Neptune is always shown armed a trident. The Hindu god Shiva is always shown with a trident (trishul in Sanskrit). If you turn the OM symbol to the right side, it looks like a trident head. You have the Fluer di lis symbol which is a trident in disguise. The name/word ‘Allah’ written in Arabic looks quite obviously like a trident head. If you look carefully, at the Sikh Khanda symbol, it is also a trident head.

    6) Sikhism is against magic, rituals, etc. Did the Sikh gurus want to put an end to superstitions to free people, or did they want to suppress psychic ability and supernatural powers in the Sikh community? It must be noted that the gurus themselves performed supernatural feats. For example, the 8th Sikh guru cured small-pox sufferers with a cloth (he died at the age of 8). Mr Icke states in his writings that throughout history, reptilians have tried to suppress humankind’s supernatural abilities in order to weaken people and have more control over them. One way the reptilians did this was to make people (through their ‘holy men‘ slaves) believe that magic and psychic ability was unholy and came from the devil. But these powers are natural human abilities which most humans have forgotten about, thanks to the manipulation of the reptilians.

    7) The number 5 comes up quite a lot in things connected to Sikhism. Sikhism was founded in Punjab (land of the five rivers). There are five articles of faith which an orthodox Sikh must wear. Five coins (along with a coconut) were placed in a tray in a ritual when the tenth prophet of the Sikh religion, Guru Gobind Singh, handed over the guru authority to the Sikh scripture. Guru Arjan Dev was the fifth guru of the Sikhs. He was tortured to death (martyred) by the Mughals. This caused his son (who became the next guru) to militarise the Sikh people.

    8) According to Mr Icke’s writings, the lion is an important symbol of secret societies. We can see the lion in the English coat of arms and on some British coins. Gobind Singh, the tenth prophet, commanded that all Sikh males are to replace their surname with ‘Singh’ (which means ‘lion‘) and all Sikh females are to replace their surname with ‘Kaur’ (which means ‘princess’ - linked to goddess Semiramis?). The guru did this as part of the Sikh effort to abolish the caste system. A surname can reveal what caste a person belongs to, so the guru wanted to erase traditional surnames. The guru’s name was Gobind Rai (Rai being a high caste Aryan name). He then became known as Gobind Singh. This all happened during the founding of the ‘Khalsa’ in AD 1699. This guru gave Sikhism its final form. Khalsa means pure, and the word has Arabic origins. Had the guru used a Sanskrit word for ‘pure’, it would have been ‘Arya’ (Aryan).

    9) Sacrifice is vital to the reptilians/Illuminati. They usually sacrifice humans (e.g. Princess Diana). In Judaism and Islam, a goat’s throat is slit in order to drain its body of blood. In Hinduism, human sacrifices were offered to please the goddess Kali. Goats were slaughtered as well. Later, only goats were slaughtered. The method of slaughter was chopping the head off in one stroke with a sword. Sikh warriors later adopted this practice. They called the method of slaughter ’Chatka’ or ‘Jhatka’ which means ‘one strike’ or ’one stroke’. The meat (and blood) is collected in an iron batta (bowl) and is used to make a nice meal. Mainstream Orthodox Sikhs reject meat-eating. Remember, most Sikhs had Hindu ancestors, and a few mainstream Hindu beliefs, such as vegetarianism, slipped into Sikhism. It is said that chopping goat necks was good battle training for warriors as the neck of a goat is very much like the neck of a human. By the way, the tenth Sikh guru prohibited the consumption of meat from animals which are slaughtered according to Islamic tradition as the animal is goes through extreme pain (a throat-slit). This prohibition would obviously also apply to Kosher meat. The Chatka method is quick and a blow is struck with the sword when the animal seems distracted. As a side note, I doubt the guru ever encouraged meat eating, but he did not forbid Sikhs to eat meat altogether. And he also enjoyed hunting animals, as did his grandfather, Guru Hargobind (who was sixth guru).

    10) Sikh elders, especially the committee members of a Gurdwara (Sikh temple) and Sikh scripture scholars, may seem like senile old men with big turbans, but many of them are cunning Freemasons. It would surprise you if you knew how many Sikhs were Freemasons. The Freemasons are always hard at work to recruit Sikh elders who take care of all the religious stuff, and up-and-coming male Sikh entrepreneurs. On Sikh festivals, you will see many Sikhs linked to Sikh temples handing out free Indian food and juices/water bottles. Free hot food is also available inside every Sikh temple which all visitors are commanded to eat after bowing to the Shri Guru Granth Sahib ji, which is the last guru of the Sikhs (and which they must consider a real guru and not just a book). Many of the Sikhs who organise this free food community service are not doing it because the Sikh gurus commanded this, but they do it to get browny points with their Freemason masters. When you join a lodge, the Freemasons tell you that you must get involved with charitable work. This helps Freemasons to gain control in communities. This is part of covert control. Overt control doesn’t last long. The reptilians/Freemasons/Illuminati know this.

    11) The reptilians/Freemasons/Illuminati have been and still are behind all the riots, wars, uprisings and terrorism in the world, including the ‘Khalistan movement’ which aims to establish a Sikh state on a part of Indian land. The movement was founded by Freemasonic Sikhs (on the orders of British Freemason) around the time the British were planning to leave India (as they had planned even before entering India). In 1984, the Freemasons got their slave, President Indira Gandhi, to send the Indian army into the Golden Temple, the holiest Sikh shrine, and attack it with rifles and cannons and to kill pro-Khalistan militants (who were innocent men deceived by Sikh (Freemasonic) leaders who convinced them that they were fighting for a just cause). Then the Sikh (Freemason) religious leaders were ordered to incite hatred against Hindus and the nation of India, which resulted in riots and terrorist acts by pro-Khalistan Sikhs (mainly in the 80s). While Sikh Freemasons were told by their superiors to demonise the Hindu community, the Hindu Freemasons were told by their masters to demonise the Sikh community. It’s divide and conquer. While the communities fight and kill each other, the religious leaders hide in safe places. But the deaths of these leaders can be and are faked, as well. Death would immortalise them and continue their messages for a very long time.

    The world is one big stage. Monarchs, religious and political leaders are the actors (the best actors). And our history, present, and future is a sad psychological horror story.
     
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  3. harbansj24

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    This is the most cynical article I have ever read.

    In effect it says that anything done by Sikh Gurus or by any known religious or historical leader anywhere in the world was done by ulterior motive especially to gain power over other human beings.

    But are not human beings not supposed to interact with each other? And if they interact, what are they supposed to do? Not influence anyone? because then you will gain power over the other person which is ungodly?!!!:crazy::crazy::confused::confused:. If we communicate how do we communicate without passing on our thoughts which should be non influential!

    This is questioning God's creation of Mankind itself!
     
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  4. faujasingh

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    I have found this on a website, this seems to be the same concept
     

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  5. spnadmin

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    faujasinghji

    Please explain why you think the pic is illustrating the same concept. Which concept so far BTW? I am thinking you mean reptilians and Sikhism but I am not sure because the pic seems to be of Shiva. I can't see it too well.

    Shiva in legend was adorned with snakes. The story of why is intensely meaningful once one goes below the surface. But the cobras are his trademark ":advocate:" and a fascinating representation of the nature of Shiva's creativity in myth, belief and lore. They are archetypal images reaching far back into the subconscious memories of humankind. Having said all of this, I myself do not believe that the snakes of Shiva are even close in their symbolism to the concept of reptilians introduced in this thread. In addition, Shiva is not per se a core entity within Sikhism. So I may misunderstand you and need to read what you have to say.

    Note: Anyone who sends me an angry message because I wrote that Shiva is not a core entity within Sikhism, should know that I will delete the message immediately.
     
  6. Admin Singh

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    Narayanjot ji, correct me if i may be wrong, but that image seems to be of the Bhagauti, the Shakti, the Chandi. Nothing to do with Lord Shiva or am i just confusing everything up. :confused:
     
  7. faujasingh

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    What I had read was that this image is of the chola era. The chola dynasty ruled India during the 9th century. What is noticable and suprisingly is similiar to the author's explanation above is the trident behind the statue of 'Shiva' . This is so similiar to the Khanda
     
  8. spnadmin

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    You know what Aman ji - You are right and I am wrong. That is the image of a woman. Not Shiva. My eyes and mind both failed me this morning.
     
  9. faujasingh

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    Well you both might be right, I think thats what is mentioned adhanareshawa or something perhaps seems to be something similiar i cannot understand all that mytho stuff that well though.
     
  10. spnadmin

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    faujasingh ji

    At this point I am certain that I am wrong. It is Chandi. In a bit I will get back to this thread and show you what I have found. Right now I have to read all the threads newly posted to see what is going on.
     
  11. faujasingh

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    I appreciate it !
     
  12. spnadmin

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    It is Chandi -- and the design is of the Chand worn by Nihangs. From this link comes the information below.

    Amrit Cares - Questions: Aad Chand


    Question: - I was wondering what is the meaning of the Chand that Nihangs wear on their dhumleh? Ive seen many wear them, there are many stories that I have heard, but I dont know which one is true, could you please englighten me with knowledge or any factual proof of this chand that is worn by Sikhs/Nihangs.

    Answer : - More research is needed to know why Nihangs wear this symbol.

    (1) The logo or symbol of 'Aad Chand' is basically 'Ardh Chandra' (Half Moon). The Sanskrit word 'Ardh' (Half) is written 'Addh' in Punjabi. The term 'Addh' is transformed into 'Aad'. The Sanskrit word 'Chandra' (Moon) becomes 'Chand' in Punjabi. Thus, 'Aad Chand' is nothing but 'Ardh Chandra'.

    For thousands of years, the symbol of 'Ardh Chandra' existed in Hindu religion. For example, please the image below: -

    [​IMG]

    A picture of Natraj's statue, which is hundreds years old, even before the birth of Sikhism.

    Please compare this image to Nihangs' 'Aad Chand' and draw your own conclusion.

    The 'Ardh Chandra' is associated with Indian god 'Shiva' (Shankra). It is very common to see 'Ardh Chandra' on forehead of Shiv in pictures and statues etc. Natraj is considered an incarnation of Shiv-Shankra.

    [​IMG]



    The Khanda is the image of two swords - Miri and Piri. Not the same as the Half-moon/ Trident. I am feeling very stupid about this. ::cool:: Anyway - Shiva may wear the arth chandra but that is not Shiva in the photo you posted.

    Snakes/reptiles nonetheless are part of the symbolic meaning being conveyed.

    Go to this link to see wonderful pics of Nihangs wearing the arth Chandra

    Google Image Result for http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~akali/Index/Mad%20Eyes%20intro.jpg


     
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  13. spnadmin

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    Here are quite a few:

    [​IMG]
     
  14. faujasingh

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    thank you, i although dont understand much of that what is said in ancient religions since i am not too religious however you post made things a bit easier to understand
     
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  15. spnadmin

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    Well thanks, but I have still not recovered from my mistake. Thanks to Aman ji who pointed it out.
     
  16. faujasingh

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    what mistake ?
     
  17. spnadmin

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    Thinking the statue was of Shiva.
     
  18. faujasingh

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    well that the statue alone knows. I am not too familiar with idols except for that khanda like look of the trident behind.
     
  19. spnadmin

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    The khanda and the trident are different.
     
  20. faujasingh

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    i know they are different however that shape was too similiar is what i am saying
     
  21. spnadmin

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    faujasinghji

    I understand. The shapes are reminiscent of one another but the curved portion of the khanda comes originally from a circle that represents the idea of no beginning/no ending, perfect continuity. A complete and perfect state of union with the Divine. See below:

    sikhchic.com | The Art and Culture of the Diaspora | The Khanda Contest Deadline: Feb 15 2009

    1 THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE KHANDA [see top-right corner of this page for the traditional Khanda, as depicted on Canadian postage stamps]
    Just as the Cross symbolizes Christianity, the Star of David represents the Jewish faith, and the Crescent Islam, so does the Khanda epitomize the Sikh religion.

    Rooted in Sikh theology and more than five centuries of history, it reflects certain fundamental concepts of the Faith.

    The complete symbol derives its name from the double-edged sword - also known as the Khanda - which stands at the heart of the logo. The Khanda is a potent metaphor of divine knowledge, its sharp edges cleaving truth from falsehood.

    The circle around the Khanda is the
    chukker - a figure without beginning or end - symbolizing an infinite God, the Lord of all Creation. The Sikh is to seek divine knowledge as the path to ultimate union with God, a state as complete and perfect as the circle.
     

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