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General The mysterious 13

Discussion in 'Hard Talk' started by drkhalsa, Sep 5, 2007.

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  1. drkhalsa

    drkhalsa
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    The mysterious 13
    Usha Paul
    Though we boast about entering a scientific arena, still many of us believe in taboos associated with number 13. It is evident from the fact that the dread of 13 is not limited to India but spreads throughout the world. Many buildings in US and Europe have no 13th floor and are numbered 12(a) or 12 (b). People generally refuse to take car number 13, students hesitate to occupy room number 13 in hostels and businessmen are reluctant to take new business or a journey on 13.
    The fear of 13 has been prevailing since centuries. Our history reveals that most powerful rulers like Alexander, Napoleon Bonaparte, American presidents Herbert Hoover and F.D. Roosevelt were plagued by the number 13. Of course in ancient times the reason for the dread of 13 may be lack of awareness.
    The occult symbol that stands for number 13 was represented by a mystic picture. The picture was of “a skeleton with a scythe in its bony hands, reaping down men.” It was a curious picture and provoked the idea of death in the minds of those, who could not understand the inner meaning of the symbol.
    Even in this rational age we cite examples of tragedies occurring due to 13. It serves as just a reason to convince others about evil power associated with number 13. However, if we gather good memories associated with number 13, naturally the fear will vanish from our minds. Though I have a very shallow knowledge in this field yet I can mention many examples which go in favour of number 13. At least for Indians number 13 has proved to be very lucky.
    We all know Mahatma Gandhi’s real name was Mohan Das Karam Chand Gandhi, but the name which made him the “Father of Nation” is “Mahatma Gandhi” consisting of 13 letters. So it was his 13 letter name that made him greatest man of his time. Isn’t it that number 13 is lucky for him ? Similarly Prime Minister “Manmohan Singh” and the lady President “Pratibha Patil,” each has 13 letters in his/her name. Not only this, if you count letters of our missile man “A.P.J. Abdul Kalam” it again comes 13.
    Moving to the field of sports many renowned personalities like “Sunil Gavaskar”, “Sourav Ganguly” (former cricket captains), Vijay Amrit Raj (India’s lawn tennis player), “Dhanraj Pillay” (Indian hockey skipper) are all blessed by number 13. Dhan Raj Pillay not only has 13 letters in his name, he even wears 13 on his T-shirt in the four series matches in Pakistan and gave an outstanding performance.
    Number 13 has its significance in the Indian festivals also. In the northern India 13th April is considered as most auspicious day for wheat harvesting and is celebrated as Baisakhi festival. Similarly Lohri festival on 13th January is also celebrated with great pomp and show. The special thing about these festivals is their fixed dates.
    I believe, you will agree with me when I say that numbers are the property of a mathematician. A “Mathematician” cannot exist without number 13 as it is again a collection of 13 letters. For a mathematician 13 is very lucky and playful. It is lucky as it is fifth prime number and playful because many interesting calculations are derived out of it.
    For example: Square of 13 is 169 and if we reverse the two digits of 13 i.e. convert 13 to 31and take the square of 31 it again has the same digits 1, 6, 9 and in the reverse order
    i.e. 13 x 13= (13)2 =169
    & 31 x 31= (31)2 = 961
    Also if we insert + sign between all the digits in the above equations, the equation still holds good. i.e. (1+3) x (1+3) = 1+6+9
    (3+1) x (3+1) = 9+6+1
    In the end I will say that all the numbers are very sacred, perfect, pleasant and lucky, so be friendly with them.
    ushapaul.123@gmail.com
     
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