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FAQs for Students Support for Turban in Guru Granth Sahib Ji

Discussion in 'Questions and Answers' started by Ishna, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. Ishna

    Ishna
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    Howdy

    Recently I made a comment that there wasn't actually any support or specific endorsement of wearing turban in SGGS, and was told that yes, there in fact is.

    Can someone please show me where?

    Many thanks
     
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  3. Arvind

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    Respected Ishna ji,

    I quickly searched SGGS and found a shabad on ang 727 (attached file)... though I understand it may be irrelevant to your query.

    Turban is important for a few reasons:
    1. Our Guru wore it
    2. Guru ordered sikhs to carry ourselves with higher self esteem (Kings used to wear turban that time)
    3. Guru wanted sikhs to stand out for easier recognition
    4. to maintain hygiene of kesh

    Just like there is no direct mention of cleaning teeth, using facial creams, jogging, going to work in cars, flying by planes etc etc, there may not be mention of turban!

    Please forgive my ignorance.

    With Regards,
    Arvind.
     

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  4. Tejwant Singh

    Tejwant Singh United States
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    Arvind ji,

    Guru fateh.

    It is NOT what you think or claim. Please read and post the whole Shabad with your own understanding. The second line of this Shabad explains everything what Guru Sahib is talking about.

    Many Sikhs quote this one liner without understanding the whole Shabad about who Guru ji was addressing to.

    Thanks & regards

    Tejwant Singh
     
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    #3 Tejwant Singh, Mar 26, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
  5. techsingh

    techsingh United States
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  6. Luckysingh

    Luckysingh Canada
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    Fantastic pagg song !!
    It goes with my favourites like
    -Tedhi pagh walia
    -Milky by Bups sagoo/Jati cheed.
    -assinh Sardar- Babbu mann
    -teri dastaar
    -sandhuri pagg- surjit bhullar.

    and the many female pagg songs about matching the chunni or lengha colour with partners pagg !

    God bless the punjabi pagg waley !

    Have a listen to and watch this video singing about the pagg and it's identity.

    Pagg Di Shaan.mp4 - YouTube
     
    #5 Luckysingh, Mar 27, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 27, 2013
  7. Ishna

    Ishna
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    So is turban a cultural Punjabi thing more than a religious thing?

    Gurbani doesn't talk about wearing any particular clothing, in fact it talks about the traps of religious clothing and about being pure 'on the outside' but impure 'on the inside'.

    I have met Sikhs who have said the Khalsa identity was useful at the time and for the purpose that Guru Gobind Singh instituted it but isn't relevant now (in conversations about all 5 Ks, not just turban).

    But I'm still interested to see where Gurbani supports turban, as I was explicitly told it does.
     
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  8. Luckysingh

    Luckysingh Canada
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    Ishna ji, i have actually questioned the same to myself some time ago !!

    Infact, i was self questioning the whole 5k's because they are not specified as being essential requirements for a gurmukh in the Gurur Granth sahib ji.
    However, my conclusion was that Guruji in 1699 ''Demonstrated' what the khalsa was and who the sikh was.
    He demonstrated what one has to offer in exchange for acquiring the khalsa image which was only demonstrated and instructed after the 5 offered their heads.

    My conclusion was that Guruji's witnessed instructions and demonstration was enough to convince a sikh on the path to khalsa and gurmukhi.

    It's my own conclusion and answer to my own question but I hope it can help answer or find yours.:mundahug::sippingcoffeemunda:
     
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  9. Luckysingh

    Luckysingh Canada
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    Guru Gobind Singh ji didn't write specific instructions in the Guru Granth sahib ji or Adi granth because he only re-wrote it to include the work of his father.
    He left it as Guru Arjan Dev ji had but with the addition of his fathers shabads.
    If you want to see written instructions by Guruji then these are available elsewhere, including what the Guru's Khalsa really means, what the nihangs go by...etc..etc..
    Whether you rely on these sources is another question and I don't want to go off topic !:grinningsingh::kaurhug::grinningsingh:

    I have seen references in other threads on here to 'sab surat dastar' shabad on 1084 I think. This is wrong and is not an instruction but a quote to muslims !
     
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    #8 Luckysingh, Mar 27, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2013
  10. jasbirkaleka

    jasbirkaleka India
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    Turban is not something that was suddenly invented by the Sikhs.
    People right from the South-Indians to the Rajputs and the Pathans in Afganistan, tied turbans, and many still do.
    In the princely state of Patiala,all courtiers,may they be Brahamins or Banyas tied a motia-coloured turban.
    People of Turkey, Egypt, some Arab countries too tied turbans and the tradition is still followed by many today..:redturban:
     
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  11. Archived_Member16

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    AS A MATTER OF FURTHER INTEREST:


    Dastar

    Dastar (Punjabi: ਦਸਤਾਰ, dastār, from Persian: دستار‎) or Pagṛi (Punjabi: ਪਗੜੀ)or Pagg (Punjabi: ਪੱਗ), is a mandatory headgear for Sikh men. Dastar is very clearly associated with Sikhism and is an important part of the Sikh culture. Wearing a Sikh turban is mandatory for all Amritdhari (baptized) Sikh men (also known as Khalsa).

    Among the Sikhs, the turban is an article of faith that represents honour, self-respect, courage, spirituality, and piety. The Khalsa Sikh men, who adorn the Five Ks, wear the turban partly to cover their long, uncut hair (kesh). The turban is mostly identified with the Sikh males, although some Sikh women also wear turban. The Khalsa Sikhs regard the turban as an important part of the unique Sikh identity.

    History

    The turban has been an important part of the Sikh religion since the time of the First Guru. Guru Angad Dev honoured Guru Amar Das with a special turban when he was declared the next Guru. At the time when Guru Ram Das passed away, Guru Arjan Dev was honoured with the turban of Guruship.

    Marne di pag Pirthiye badhi. Guriyaee pag Arjan Ladhi[1]

    Guru Gobind Singh, the last human Sikh Guru, wrote:

    Kangha dono vaqt kar, paag chune kar bandhai. ("Comb your hair twice a day and tie your turban carefully, turn by turn.")

    Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu, one of the earliest Sikh historians, wrote in Sri Gur Panth Parkash:[2]

    Doi vele utth bandhyo dastare, pahar aatth rakhyo shastar sambhare
    Kesan ki kijo pritpal, nah(i) ustran se katyo vaal
    Tie your turban twice a day and wear shaster (weapons to protect dharma), and keep them with care, 24 hours a day.
    Take good care of your hair. Do not cut or damage your hair.

    Significance

    In the Khalsa society, the turban signifies many virtues:

    Spirituality

    The turban is a symbol of spirituality and holiness in Sikhism.

    Honour and self-respect

    The turban is also a symbol of honour and self-respect. In the Punjabi culture, those who have selflessly served the community are traditionally honoured with turbans.

    Responsibility


    Rasam Pagri ("turban ceremony") is a ceremony in North India. Rasam Pagri takes place, when a man passes away and his oldest son takes over the family responsibilities by tying the turban in front of a large gathering. It signifies that now he has shouldered the responsibility of his father and he is the head of the family.

    Piety and moral values

    The turban also signifies piety and purity of mind. In the Punjabi society, the Khalsa Sikhs are considered as protectors of the weak, even among the non-Sikhs. In the older times, the Khalsa warriors moved from village to village at night, during the battles. When they needed a place to hide from the enemy, the womenfolk, who had a very high degree of trust in them used to let them inside their houses. It was a common saying in Punjab: Aye nihang, booha khol de nishang ("The nihangs are at the door. Dear woman! go ahead open the door without any fear whatsoever.")

    Courage

    The Sikh warriors (Khalsa) wear turban, partly to cover their long hair, which is never cut, as per the wish of their last human Guru, Guru Gobind Singh. There are many references in the Sikh history that describe how Guru Gobind Singh personally tied beautiful dumalas (turbans) on the heads of both his elder sons Ajit Singh and Jujhar Singh, and how he personally gave them arms, decorated them like bridegrooms, and sent them to the battlefield at Chamkaur Sahib where they both died as martyrs. A saffron-colored turban is especially identified with courage, sacrifice and martyrdom.

    Friendship and relationship

    Pag Vatauni ("exchange of turban") is a Punjabi custom, in which the men exchange turbans with their closest friends. Once they exchange turbans they become friends for life and forge a permanent relationship. They take a solemn pledge to share their joys and sorrows under all circumstances. Exchanging turban is a glue that can bind two individuals or families together for generations.
    Some Sikhs also believe that wearing a turban enables one to command the Agya Chakra, the sixth yogic chakra. Harbhajan Singh Yogi wrote:[3]

    Sayings

    There are many Punjabi idioms and proverbs that describe how important is a turban in one's life. Bhai Gurdas writes:[4]

    Tthande khuhu naike pag visar(i) aya sir(i) nangai
    Ghar vich ranna(n) kamlia(n) dhussi liti dekh(i) kudhange
    ("A man, after taking a bath at the well during winter time, forgot his turban at the well and came home bareheaded.

    When the women saw him at home without a turban, they thought someone had died and they started to cry.")

    Sign of Sikhism

    The turban is considered an important part of the unique Sikh identity. The bare head is not considered appropriate as per gurbani. If a Sikh wants to become one with his/her Guru, he/she must look like a guru (wear a turban). Guru Gobind Singh stated:

    Khalsa mero roop hai khaas. Khalse me hau karo niwas.
    ("Khalsa is a true picture of mine. I live in Khalsa.")


    Maintaining long hair and tying turban is seen as a token of love and obedience of the wishes of Sikh gurus. A quote from Sikhnet:[5]

    “The turban is our Guru's gift to us. It is how we crown ourselves as the Singhs and Kaurs who sit on the throne of commitment to our own higher consciousness. For men and women alike, this projective identity conveys royalty, grace, and uniqueness. It is a signal to others that we live in the image of Infinity and are dedicated to serving all. The turban doesn't represent anything except complete commitment. When you choose to stand out by tying your turban, you stand fearlessly as one single person standing out from six billion people. It is a most outstanding act.

    References

    1. "Partakh Hari," Jiwni Guru Arjan Dev Ji, by Principal Satbir Singh
    2. Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu. Sri Gur Granth Parkash. Page 78.
    3. Takhar, Opinderjit Kaur (2005). Sikh Identity: An Exploration Of Groups Among Sikhs. 3. Aldershot: Ashgate. p. 169. 3. ISBN 3. 978-0754652021. 3. OCLC 3. 60560379.
    4. Vara(n) Bhai Gurdas, Var 32, pauri 19
    5. 5. Learn How To Tie Different Sikh Turbans

    source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dastar
    - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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