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splitting database w/ different versions

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Susan, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. Susan

    Susan
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    Guest

    Not long ago I posted a question about splitting a database whose users have
    either Access 97 or Access 2003 on their PC. I was told (by Douglas J.
    Steele and Tom Wickerath...thank you, gentlemen!) that this was the way to
    go. They advised to do the split with the Access 97 version. I understand
    that...the question is how to also split off the Access 2003 version from the
    "same" data. Or does splitting it once mean that all other users are now
    working on a split database? Also, they said that any changes to the front
    end should be made on the older version, then converted to the newer one on
    the appropriate PCs. How is that done? I've never split a database before,
    let alone one that is shared by multiple users with different versions. A
    step-by-step outline or similar simple instructions would be greatly
    appreciated! Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. Brendan Reynolds

    Brendan Reynolds
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    Guest

    After splitting the Access 97 version, you will be left with two MDBs, the
    'back-end' data MDB, containing only tables, and a 'front-end' application
    MDB, containing everything else - queries, forms, reports, and modules -
    plus links to the tables in the 'back-end' data MDB. Make an Access 2003
    version of this 'front-end' application MDB, but leave the 'back-end' data
    MDB alone - Access 2003 can link to Access 97 tables. So you now have two
    versions of the 'front-end' application MDB, one in Access 97 and the other
    in Access 2003, both linking to the same tables in the same Access 97-format
    'back-end' data MDB. Just give each user a copy of the appropriate
    'front-end' application MDB - Access 97 users get the Access 97 version,
    Access 2003 users get the Access 2003 version.

    To create an Access 2003 version of the 'front-end' application MDB, just
    open it in Access 2003 - Access 2003 will ask whether you want to convert or
    open it, choose convert.

    --
    Brendan Reynolds

    "Susan" <Susan@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:E802FF05-3362-445D-B9C5-47B692641C38@microsoft.com...
    > Not long ago I posted a question about splitting a database whose users
    > have
    > either Access 97 or Access 2003 on their PC. I was told (by Douglas J.
    > Steele and Tom Wickerath...thank you, gentlemen!) that this was the way to
    > go. They advised to do the split with the Access 97 version. I
    > understand
    > that...the question is how to also split off the Access 2003 version from
    > the
    > "same" data. Or does splitting it once mean that all other users are now
    > working on a split database? Also, they said that any changes to the
    > front
    > end should be made on the older version, then converted to the newer one
    > on
    > the appropriate PCs. How is that done? I've never split a database before,
    > let alone one that is shared by multiple users with different versions. A
    > step-by-step outline or similar simple instructions would be greatly
    > appreciated! Thanks in advance.
     
  4. Susan

    Susan
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    Guest

    Thanks, Brendan...I guess I was thinking it more difficult than it really is.
    I'll try to get to it today, and let you know how it came out (tho' I think
    I'll try it on a copy, first!)

    Susan

    "Brendan Reynolds" wrote:

    > After splitting the Access 97 version, you will be left with two MDBs, the
    > 'back-end' data MDB, containing only tables, and a 'front-end' application
    > MDB, containing everything else - queries, forms, reports, and modules -
    > plus links to the tables in the 'back-end' data MDB. Make an Access 2003
    > version of this 'front-end' application MDB, but leave the 'back-end' data
    > MDB alone - Access 2003 can link to Access 97 tables. So you now have two
    > versions of the 'front-end' application MDB, one in Access 97 and the other
    > in Access 2003, both linking to the same tables in the same Access 97-format
    > 'back-end' data MDB. Just give each user a copy of the appropriate
    > 'front-end' application MDB - Access 97 users get the Access 97 version,
    > Access 2003 users get the Access 2003 version.
    >
    > To create an Access 2003 version of the 'front-end' application MDB, just
    > open it in Access 2003 - Access 2003 will ask whether you want to convert or
    > open it, choose convert.
    >
    > --
    > Brendan Reynolds
    >
    > "Susan" <Susan@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:E802FF05-3362-445D-B9C5-47B692641C38@microsoft.com...
    > > Not long ago I posted a question about splitting a database whose users
    > > have
    > > either Access 97 or Access 2003 on their PC. I was told (by Douglas J.
    > > Steele and Tom Wickerath...thank you, gentlemen!) that this was the way to
    > > go. They advised to do the split with the Access 97 version. I
    > > understand
    > > that...the question is how to also split off the Access 2003 version from
    > > the
    > > "same" data. Or does splitting it once mean that all other users are now
    > > working on a split database? Also, they said that any changes to the
    > > front
    > > end should be made on the older version, then converted to the newer one
    > > on
    > > the appropriate PCs. How is that done? I've never split a database before,
    > > let alone one that is shared by multiple users with different versions. A
    > > step-by-step outline or similar simple instructions would be greatly
    > > appreciated! Thanks in advance.

    >
    >
    >
     

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