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Sharing db over a network

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Flyersc, Oct 29, 2005.

  1. Flyersc

    Flyersc
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    Guest

    I am running Win 98 with Access 2000, and try to open an .mdw on another
    computer(not through a server, just peer-to-peer) which has XP and Access
    2000. I get the error "cannot open the file... it is already opened exclus.
    by another user, or you don't have permission". I can open the same db on
    other computers running Win 98 and NT. Is it an XP thing or an Access
    workgroup thing? Also, I CAN open the .mdw on my computer from the one
    running XP, but it defaults to read-only.
     
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  3. Joseph Meehan

    Joseph Meehan
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    Guest

    Flyersc wrote:
    >I am running Win 98 with Access 2000, and try to open an .mdw on
    > another computer(not through a server, just peer-to-peer) which has
    > XP and Access 2000. I get the error "cannot open the file... it is
    > already opened exclus. by another user, or you don't have
    > permission". I can open the same db on other computers running Win 98
    > and NT. Is it an XP thing or an Access workgroup thing? Also, I CAN
    > open the .mdw on my computer from the one running XP, but it defaults
    > to read-only.


    Are you sure you want to try to open the workgroup file? If so why?

    The following is based on the assumption that you are trying to open the
    MDB or MDE file.

    When you say you can open it on other computers, do you mean you can
    open the same file on the same "remote" computer from other computers on the
    same peer to peer network?

    Access is rather demanding of the network, so it is possible that the
    network is not up to speed.

    When you try to open it from your machine, take a look to see if there
    is a YOURFILENAME.LDB file there. If so it indicates someone else is
    already in the file or there has been a error and that file was not deleted
    when the last person quit. Is there a chance someone else has the file open
    and they have it opened exclusively.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
  4. Albert D.Kallal

    Albert D.Kallal
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    Guest

    Well, the big change form win98 to win2000 and beyond is that the new
    systems have a new secirty model.

    That means you can take a floopy disk, insert it into your windows xp box,
    drag the file to your desktop, and then drag the file to the "shared"
    folder, and NO ONE can use the file!! Why? Because in windows xp, EACH FILE
    can be assgiend permissons by the operating system.

    So, that file can inherit YOUR default permssions, and then when you copy
    the file to the server, or shared folder, the file may wind up without
    permsisons for others to use. I don't think it needs pointing out that
    changing from simple windows 9x to a complirty new operation system with a
    complirty new secirty sytem, and a complity new and deiffernt file system is
    going to take some learning on your part. There should be no surprises here
    in that you are talking about a complity differnt OS and differnt system.
    While these newer systems do offer 100% compatiblity with older systems,
    they are far more complex, and have far more features. And, I probably
    should not call these systems "new", since windwos XP is actauly based on
    windows 2000, and that been out for a VERY VERY long time!!!

    So, keep mind you are using a very differnt system the win98, and one that
    is far more complex...

    "Flyersc" <Flyersc@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:FA63763F-AB41-43B3-8E44-31A0D803E2D9@microsoft.com...
    >I am running Win 98 with Access 2000, and try to open an .mdw on another
    > computer(not through a server, just peer-to-peer)


    Hum, we don't normllay "open" a mdw file here. You certaly specoify which
    one to use in the short cut. If you database is not secuired, then just
    leave everhting to the default workgorup file. If you are using a particlar
    workgroup file for a particlar appclation, then that workgroup file should
    be in the same shared folder/directory as the mdb file. However, I will
    repeat, if you are not using ms-access secirty (which is complity un-readed
    to the seicrty in windows 2000/xp), then don't worroy about the workgroup
    file.

    However, if you are talking aobut multi-user, AND YOU ARE using workgroup
    seicrty, then put the workgroup file in with the mdb file, and ensure that
    EVERYONE has full persisions to the dirclity.

    If users don't hae full permsosns (and full means full here!!), then often
    ms-access will default to read-only, as it can't mantin multi-user "locking"
    files. Thsoe files have to be crated, and dleeted in the same direcity as
    the mdb file (so, you must give users both create, and delete rights, since
    iif access can't crate and delete those lcoking files, it goes back to
    single user mode, or "read" only mode).

    In addtion to the above informaton, if you do plan to try multi-user
    applcations develpomed with ms-access, then read my folowing aritcle as to
    why you need to split....
     
  5. Albert D.Kallal

    Albert D.Kallal
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    opps...bumped send key...

    here is the correted version...


    Well, the big change form win98 to win2000 and beyond is that the new
    systems have a new security model.

    That means you can take a floppy disk, insert it into your windows xp box,
    drag the file to your desktop, and then drag the file to the "shared"
    folder, and NO ONE can use the file!! Why? Because in windows xp, EACH FILE
    can be assigned permissions by the operating system.

    So, that file can inherit YOUR default permissions, and then when you copy
    the file to the server, or shared folder, the file may wind up without
    permissions for others to use. I don't think it needs pointing out that
    changing from simple windows 9x to a complex new operation system with a
    complete new security system, and a complete new and different file system
    is
    going to take some learning on your part. There should be no surprises here
    in that you are talking about a complete different OS and different system.
    While these newer systems do offer 100% compatibility with older systems,
    they are far more complex, and have far more features. And, I probably
    should not call these systems "new", since windows XP is actually based on
    windows 2000, and that been out for a VERY VERY long time!!!

    So, keep mind you are using a very different system the win98, and one that
    is far more complex...

    >I am running Win 98 with Access 2000, and try to open an .mdw on another
    > computer(not through a server, just peer-to-peer)


    Hum, we don't normally "open" a mdw file here. You certainly specify which
    one to use in the short cut. If you database is not secured, then just
    leave everything to the default workgroup file. If you are using a
    particular
    workgroup file for a particular appellation, then that workgroup file should
    be in the same shared folder/directory as the mdb file. However, I will
    repeat, if you are not using ms-access security (which is complete
    un-related
    to the security in windows 2000/xp), then don't worry about the workgroup
    file.

    However, if you are talking about multi-user, AND YOU ARE using workgroup
    security, then put the workgroup file in with the mdb file, and ensure that
    EVERYONE has full permissions to the directory.

    If users don't have full permissions (and full means full here!!), then
    often
    ms-access will default to read-only, as it can't maintain multi-user
    "locking"
    files. Those files have to be crated, and deleted in the same directory as
    the mdb file (so, you must give users both create, and delete rights, since
    if access can't crate and delete those locking files, it goes back to
    single user mode, or "read" only mode).

    In addition to the above information, if you do plan to try multi-user
    applications developed with ms-access, then read my following article as to
    why you need to split....

    http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal/Articles/split/index.htm


    --
    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    pleaseNOOSpamKallal@msn.com
    http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
     

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