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Runtime installation questions

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by google3luo359@yahoo.com, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. google3luo359@yahoo.com

    google3luo359@yahoo.com
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    Guest

    There's a good likelihood that an Access db I developed will be
    deployed on approx. 50 pcs.

    What I'd like to find out is the time that will be required to complete
    the installation. (2002 DevKit)

    Approx. 20 pc's will be networked in one room another 20 pc's networked
    in another room and approx. 10-15 notebooks are probably standalone.

    Can/do you install a runtime on the server for the networked pc's or
    must it be installed on each pc?
    How much time are we talking approx. for the various scenarios above,
    to complete all installs?


    Also, I read the following in a Googled thread from 2000.

    > "You can get a cut down version of Access called Run-time (free from MS) which presents > the user with a restricted Access interface but some form of Access must be installed. "
    >--
    >Steve J Morgan
    >QA Training


    When did MS stop distributing runtimes for free?

    Thanks!
    Ric
     
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  3. Rick Brandt

    Rick Brandt
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    Guest

    google3luo359@yahoo.com wrote:
    > There's a good likelihood that an Access db I developed will be
    > deployed on approx. 50 pcs.
    >
    > What I'd like to find out is the time that will be required to
    > complete the installation. (2002 DevKit)
    >
    > Approx. 20 pc's will be networked in one room another 20 pc's
    > networked in another room and approx. 10-15 notebooks are probably
    > standalone.
    >
    > Can/do you install a runtime on the server for the networked pc's or
    > must it be installed on each pc?


    Each PC. Just like if you were installing Word or Excel.

    > How much time are we talking approx. for the various scenarios above,
    > to complete all installs?


    Couple minutes?

    > Also, I read the following in a Googled thread from 2000.
    >
    > > "You can get a cut down version of Access called Run-time (free
    > > from MS) which presents > the user with a restricted Access
    > > interface but some form of Access must be installed. " --
    > > Steve J Morgan
    > > QA Training

    >
    > When did MS stop distributing runtimes for free?


    The license to distribute the runtime was never free for the developer. It is
    free for the user of the PC where you install it.

    --
    Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
    Email (as appropriate) to...
    RBrandt at Hunter dot com
     
  4. google3luo359@yahoo.com

    google3luo359@yahoo.com
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    Guest

    Rick Brandt wrote:

    > > How much time are we talking approx. for the various scenarios above,
    > > to complete all installs?

    >
    > Couple minutes?


    So you figure just a couple of minutes for each PC to install from a
    CD?
    I suppose it would be smart to make 10 or so copies of the CD to speed
    things up.

    Do you just choose 'install Runtime' from a menu or something like
    that?

    TIA Ric
     
  5. John Vinson

    John Vinson
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    Guest

    On 11 Jun 2006 19:38:20 -0700, google3luo359@yahoo.com wrote:

    > So you figure just a couple of minutes for each PC to install from a
    >CD?
    >I suppose it would be smart to make 10 or so copies of the CD to speed
    >things up.


    Nope. Network install, from a shared drive.

    John W. Vinson[MVP]
     
  6. google3luo359@yahoo.com

    google3luo359@yahoo.com
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    > > So you figure just a couple of minutes for each PC to install from a
    > >CD?
    > >I suppose it would be smart to make 10 or so copies of the CD to speed
    > >things up.

    >
    > Nope. Network install, from a shared drive.
    >
    > John W. Vinson[MVP]



    Thanks John,

    This makes a lot more sense. And it will save a heck of a lot of time
    too.
    I wonder what Rick was thinking of when he replied?

    Ric
     
  7. John Vinson

    John Vinson
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    Guest

    On 11 Jun 2006 20:32:12 -0700, google3luo359@yahoo.com wrote:

    >I wonder what Rick was thinking of when he replied?


    I'm not privy to Rick's internal cogitations, but I'd guess...

    Network install, from a shared drive. <g>

    John W. Vinson[MVP]
     
  8. aaron.kempf@gmail.com

    aaron.kempf@gmail.com
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    Guest

    using MDB for a 2 users isn't possible.

    use Access Data Projects; these things rock!!!
    especially for that many users.

    you can get a copy of the SQL Server Developers' edition for only $49;
    and then you don't have to deal with

    a) compact / repair
    b) designing indexes
    c) troubleshooting queries
    d) distributing queries
    e) copying 50mb front ends to each pc


    adp are better for end users; if you can't write a couple views and
    sprocs; go get some commercial help





    Rick Brandt wrote:
    > google3luo359@yahoo.com wrote:
    > > There's a good likelihood that an Access db I developed will be
    > > deployed on approx. 50 pcs.
    > >
    > > What I'd like to find out is the time that will be required to
    > > complete the installation. (2002 DevKit)
    > >
    > > Approx. 20 pc's will be networked in one room another 20 pc's
    > > networked in another room and approx. 10-15 notebooks are probably
    > > standalone.
    > >
    > > Can/do you install a runtime on the server for the networked pc's or
    > > must it be installed on each pc?

    >
    > Each PC. Just like if you were installing Word or Excel.
    >
    > > How much time are we talking approx. for the various scenarios above,
    > > to complete all installs?

    >
    > Couple minutes?
    >
    > > Also, I read the following in a Googled thread from 2000.
    > >
    > > > "You can get a cut down version of Access called Run-time (free
    > > > from MS) which presents > the user with a restricted Access
    > > > interface but some form of Access must be installed. " --
    > > > Steve J Morgan
    > > > QA Training

    > >
    > > When did MS stop distributing runtimes for free?

    >
    > The license to distribute the runtime was never free for the developer. It is
    > free for the user of the PC where you install it.
    >
    > --
    > Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
    > Email (as appropriate) to...
    > RBrandt at Hunter dot com
     
  9. Rick Brandt

    Rick Brandt
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    John Vinson wrote:
    > On 11 Jun 2006 20:32:12 -0700, google3luo359@yahoo.com wrote:
    >
    > > I wonder what Rick was thinking of when he replied?

    >
    > I'm not privy to Rick's internal cogitations, but I'd guess...
    >
    > Network install, from a shared drive. <g>
    >
    > John W. Vinson[MVP]


    Hey, great minds think alike!

    Actually I have no experience with the newer versions of the runtime installers,
    but my Access 97 runtime installations will run over a network in maybe 30
    seconds.

    --
    Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
    Email (as appropriate) to...
    RBrandt at Hunter dot com
     
  10. Larry Linson

    Larry Linson
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    Guest

    He's at it again. <SIGH>

    The post by <aaron.kempf@gmail.com> is such a fount of misinformation that I
    can only suggest you disregard it. A not-necessarily-complete list of the
    misinformation follows:

    (1) You can, indeed, implement multiuser with MDB. In fact, MDB is now the
    recommended method for Access as a client to Microsoft SQL Server, and MDB
    is what is generated by the Access 2007 Upsizing Wizard. And, in fact, there
    is a Microsoft-sponsored newsgroup on the subject:
    microsoft.public.access.multiuser.

    (2) The Developer Edition of Microsoft SQL Server is licensed only for
    development use, not for production. so using it in the manner suggested
    would be a violation of your license agreement.

    (3) A front-end (user interface) is required for user access to any version
    of SQL Server; SQL Server does not have a UI part like Access; it has
    excellent "administrative tools" but they are not an interface for users --
    they are for designers and adminstrators.

    (4) You must still design your tables, including indexes, if you use SQL
    Server -- no version has been endowed with psychic powers.

    Server databases are appropriate for many situations, but not for every
    database application. Most server databases require the full- or part-time
    attention of a qualified database administrator (DBA).

    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Access MVP
     
  11. aaron.kempf@gmail.com

    aaron.kempf@gmail.com
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Larry

    I really would like to know who the {censored word, do not repeat.} you think that you are.

    I am write.

    MDB is too obsolete; and the Access Data Projects have taken over the
    Microsoft.Public.Access newsgroup.

    ADP is the rightful heir to the Access crown... MDB is obsolete and
    anyone using it for anything anywhere should be fired immmediately.

    {censored word, do not repeat.} yourself if you disagree.

    -Aaron


    Larry Linson wrote:
    > He's at it again. <SIGH>
    >
    > The post by <aaron.kempf@gmail.com> is such a fount of misinformation that I
    > can only suggest you disregard it. A not-necessarily-complete list of the
    > misinformation follows:
    >
    > (1) You can, indeed, implement multiuser with MDB. In fact, MDB is now the
    > recommended method for Access as a client to Microsoft SQL Server, and MDB
    > is what is generated by the Access 2007 Upsizing Wizard. And, in fact, there
    > is a Microsoft-sponsored newsgroup on the subject:
    > microsoft.public.access.multiuser.
    >
    > (2) The Developer Edition of Microsoft SQL Server is licensed only for
    > development use, not for production. so using it in the manner suggested
    > would be a violation of your license agreement.
    >
    > (3) A front-end (user interface) is required for user access to any version
    > of SQL Server; SQL Server does not have a UI part like Access; it has
    > excellent "administrative tools" but they are not an interface for users --
    > they are for designers and adminstrators.
    >
    > (4) You must still design your tables, including indexes, if you use SQL
    > Server -- no version has been endowed with psychic powers.
    >
    > Server databases are appropriate for many situations, but not for every
    > database application. Most server databases require the full- or part-time
    > attention of a qualified database administrator (DBA).
    >
    > Larry Linson
    > Microsoft Access MVP
     
  12. aaron.kempf@gmail.com

    aaron.kempf@gmail.com
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    sorry i meant I am right; not I am write

    but at least im not stupid enough to use a worthless database format.


    {censored word, do not repeat.}ing idiots; grow up and smell the 90s dipshits.


    -Aaron



    Larry Linson wrote:
    > He's at it again. <SIGH>
    >
    > The post by <aaron.kempf@gmail.com> is such a fount of misinformation that I
    > can only suggest you disregard it. A not-necessarily-complete list of the
    > misinformation follows:
    >
    > (1) You can, indeed, implement multiuser with MDB. In fact, MDB is now the
    > recommended method for Access as a client to Microsoft SQL Server, and MDB
    > is what is generated by the Access 2007 Upsizing Wizard. And, in fact, there
    > is a Microsoft-sponsored newsgroup on the subject:
    > microsoft.public.access.multiuser.
    >
    > (2) The Developer Edition of Microsoft SQL Server is licensed only for
    > development use, not for production. so using it in the manner suggested
    > would be a violation of your license agreement.
    >
    > (3) A front-end (user interface) is required for user access to any version
    > of SQL Server; SQL Server does not have a UI part like Access; it has
    > excellent "administrative tools" but they are not an interface for users --
    > they are for designers and adminstrators.
    >
    > (4) You must still design your tables, including indexes, if you use SQL
    > Server -- no version has been endowed with psychic powers.
    >
    > Server databases are appropriate for many situations, but not for every
    > database application. Most server databases require the full- or part-time
    > attention of a qualified database administrator (DBA).
    >
    > Larry Linson
    > Microsoft Access MVP
     
  13. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    "aaron.kempf@gmail.com" <aaron.kempf@gmail.com> wrote:


    >using MDB for a 2 users isn't possible.


    Rubbish.

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
  14. aaron.kempf@gmail.com

    aaron.kempf@gmail.com
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Tony;

    it isn't rubbish; it is the truth.

    grow some balls and use a db engine with a future.

    -Aaron


    Tony Toews wrote:
    > "aaron.kempf@gmail.com" <aaron.kempf@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >using MDB for a 2 users isn't possible.

    >
    > Rubbish.
    >
    > Tony
    > --
    > Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    > Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    > read the entire thread of messages.
    > Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    > http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     

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