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Re: Creating An Audit Trail

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Ray S., Nov 1, 2005.

  1. Ray S.

    Ray S.
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    Guest

    "RuralGuy" wrote:

    > Here's one suggestion from MVP Allen Browne:
    > http://allenbrowne.com/AppAudit.html
    >


    This solution seems impractical. My database has hundreds of forms, tables,
    and users. Isn't there something like Oracle's "audit on"? My company is on
    the verge of dumping Access due to this.
     
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  3. Douglas J. Steele

    Douglas J. Steele
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    "Ray S." <RayS@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:FC56AF36-A93D-40E6-8C50-83D12788550C@microsoft.com...
    >
    >
    > "RuralGuy" wrote:
    >
    >> Here's one suggestion from MVP Allen Browne:
    >> http://allenbrowne.com/AppAudit.html
    >>

    >
    > This solution seems impractical. My database has hundreds of forms,
    > tables,
    > and users. Isn't there something like Oracle's "audit on"? My company is
    > on
    > the verge of dumping Access due to this.


    I'm unaware of any desktop DBMS that has audit capabilities built into it.

    Comparing Access to Oracle isn't realistic. Oracle is an enterprise-level
    DBMS (like SQL Server or DB2). Access is a development environment that
    happens to come with a DBMS (two of them, in fact).

    It's possible that you might be able to get some built-in audit capabilities
    if you use MSDE, rather than Jet, for the DBMS.


    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no e-mails, please!)
     
  4. Ray S.

    Ray S.
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    "Douglas J. Steele" wrote:

    >
    > "Ray S." <RayS@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:FC56AF36-A93D-40E6-8C50-83D12788550C@microsoft.com...
    > >
    > >
    > > "RuralGuy" wrote:
    > >
    > >> Here's one suggestion from MVP Allen Browne:
    > >> http://allenbrowne.com/AppAudit.html
    > >>

    > >
    > > This solution seems impractical. My database has hundreds of forms,
    > > tables,
    > > and users. Isn't there something like Oracle's "audit on"? My company is
    > > on
    > > the verge of dumping Access due to this.

    >
    > I'm unaware of any desktop DBMS that has audit capabilities built into it.
    >
    > Comparing Access to Oracle isn't realistic. Oracle is an enterprise-level
    > DBMS (like SQL Server or DB2). Access is a development environment that
    > happens to come with a DBMS (two of them, in fact).
    >
    > It's possible that you might be able to get some built-in audit capabilities
    > if you use MSDE, rather than Jet, for the DBMS.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > http://I.Am/DougSteele
    > (no e-mails, please!)
    >
    >



    You're right, of course. I work for a large enterprise that chose to develop
    a sarbanes-oxley issues management and tracking database application. An
    absolute requirement imposed from management and the audit personnel is that
    we must be able to track and report on any and every single change of
    information. There is now discussion as to whether we should have developed
    from the start in Oracle because it is neither easy nor practical to do this
    type of auditing in Access. You mention SQL Server. Can you point me in the
    direction of an answer in SQL?
     
  5. Douglas J. Steele

    Douglas J. Steele
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    "Ray S." <RayS@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:01E7012F-B07C-4A2A-99D6-CB50BDD2A0D1@microsoft.com...
    > "Douglas J. Steele" wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Ray S." <RayS@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:FC56AF36-A93D-40E6-8C50-83D12788550C@microsoft.com...
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "RuralGuy" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Here's one suggestion from MVP Allen Browne:
    >> >> http://allenbrowne.com/AppAudit.html
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > This solution seems impractical. My database has hundreds of forms,
    >> > tables,
    >> > and users. Isn't there something like Oracle's "audit on"? My company
    >> > is
    >> > on
    >> > the verge of dumping Access due to this.

    >>
    >> I'm unaware of any desktop DBMS that has audit capabilities built into
    >> it.
    >>
    >> Comparing Access to Oracle isn't realistic. Oracle is an enterprise-level
    >> DBMS (like SQL Server or DB2). Access is a development environment that
    >> happens to come with a DBMS (two of them, in fact).
    >>
    >> It's possible that you might be able to get some built-in audit
    >> capabilities
    >> if you use MSDE, rather than Jet, for the DBMS.
    >>

    >
    > You're right, of course. I work for a large enterprise that chose to
    > develop
    > a sarbanes-oxley issues management and tracking database application. An
    > absolute requirement imposed from management and the audit personnel is
    > that
    > we must be able to track and report on any and every single change of
    > information. There is now discussion as to whether we should have
    > developed
    > from the start in Oracle because it is neither easy nor practical to do
    > this
    > type of auditing in Access. You mention SQL Server. Can you point me in
    > the
    > direction of an answer in SQL?


    You make it sound as though you will use Access or you will use Oracle.
    There's no reason you can't use both.

    Access is a development environment that's ideally suited for dealing with
    databases. While, as I mentioned previously, Access comes with 2 separate
    DBMS, but you can easily use it with any other ODBC-compliant DBMS.

    I can't find any articles describing Access 2003 and MSDE, but take a look
    at http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/dnacc2k2/html/odc_msdeintro.asp
    to get an idea. MSDE is a "lite" version of SQL Server, but I think it still
    has the audit logs built into, just as SQL Server does. If not, you should
    be able to create your own triggers for each table to allow you to log the
    details.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no e-mails, please!)
     
  6. Ray S.

    Ray S.
    Expand Collapse
    Guest


    > You make it sound as though you will use Access or you will use Oracle.
    > There's no reason you can't use both.
    >
    > Access is a development environment that's ideally suited for dealing with
    > databases. While, as I mentioned previously, Access comes with 2 separate
    > DBMS, but you can easily use it with any other ODBC-compliant DBMS.
    >
    > I can't find any articles describing Access 2003 and MSDE, but take a look
    > at http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/dnacc2k2/html/odc_msdeintro.asp
    > to get an idea. MSDE is a "lite" version of SQL Server, but I think it still
    > has the audit logs built into, just as SQL Server does. If not, you should
    > be able to create your own triggers for each table to allow you to log the
    > details.
    >
    > --
    > Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > http://I.Am/DougSteele
    > (no e-mails, please!)
    >


    Thanks Doug,

    I guess I did seem pessimistic. I do like Access. People at work are
    familiar with the simple turn audit on feature on Oracle and find anything
    less easy to implement as a pain in the {censored word, do not repeat.}. I guess I'm just searching for
    something practical and easy to implement.
     
  7. Douglas J Steele

    Douglas J Steele
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    "Ray S." <RayS@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:9A8764F4-769D-4F9A-9D6A-1A7C3840620B@microsoft.com...
    >
    > > You make it sound as though you will use Access or you will use Oracle.
    > > There's no reason you can't use both.
    > >
    > > Access is a development environment that's ideally suited for dealing

    with
    > > databases. While, as I mentioned previously, Access comes with 2

    separate
    > > DBMS, but you can easily use it with any other ODBC-compliant DBMS.
    > >
    > > I can't find any articles describing Access 2003 and MSDE, but take a

    look
    > > at

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/dnacc2k2/html/odc_msdeintro.asp
    > > to get an idea. MSDE is a "lite" version of SQL Server, but I think it

    still
    > > has the audit logs built into, just as SQL Server does. If not, you

    should
    > > be able to create your own triggers for each table to allow you to log

    the
    > > details.
    > >

    >
    > Thanks Doug,
    >
    > I guess I did seem pessimistic. I do like Access. People at work are
    > familiar with the simple turn audit on feature on Oracle and find anything
    > less easy to implement as a pain in the {censored word, do not repeat.}. I guess I'm just searching

    for
    > something practical and easy to implement.


    But that's my point. The audit features in DBMS such as Oracle and SQL
    Server is built into the engine: it happens automatically whenever you make
    any changes to the data, regardless how you make those changes. Turn those
    features on, but use Access as the front-end to get the data in and out of
    the database.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no e-mails, please!)
     

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