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Q: What is the purpose of turban? Why do Sikhs wear turban?

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by panja, Jun 9, 2004.

  1. panja

    panja
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    A: The covering of hair with turban was made official by Guru Gobind Singh Ji, the tenth Guru of Sikhs. The main reason is to preserve the Sikh identity. Sikhs are only 2% of India’s population, if Sikhs do not wear turban, they would be lost in the crowd of Hindus and Muslims. No one will be able to identify a Sikh. Upon establishing turban as a Sikh identity Guru Gobind Singh Ji said, “My Sikh will be recognized among millions”.

    In addition, the people from high class wear turban and were called sardars (leaders). This segregated people from high and low classes. So in order to eliminate the class system associated with turban, Guru Gobind Singh Ji made each and every Sikh a sardar. He also rejected class system by giving all Sikh the last name Singh and Kaur.

    Furthermore, Sikhs do not cut their hair and the turban protects the hair from dust. Some people might ask the question that if Sikhs cover their hair on head, why don’t they cover their beard? The only reason one would cover his beard is to protect it from dirt. But dirt is not a big problem for beard. The beard can be cleaned very easily while washing the face.
     
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  3. Arvind

    Arvind
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  4. Eclectic

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    Can someone describe the look if a picture cannot be provided? Thanks. :)

    From what I've learned, Singh means 'Lion' but what does Kaur mean? Thanks people. :)
     
  5. Eclectic

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    Oh. :) And what about the turban? How is it different from any other turban?
     
  6. drkhalsa

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    This may be due to their role in the prevaling society at time of guruji

    Most of people in Khalsa army were Infact male and you can see that even in most modern armies that women are just small minority even today! so men were called Lion and females were respected as princess
     
  7. Neutral Singh

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    Message Restored from old forum:

    Sarahkaur said :
    whats the diffrence between a mans turban and a womans turban and how do you tie a turban for women
     
  8. nsbuttar

    nsbuttar
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    Yes this very true, but the role of women is no less than males whenever there were odd circumstances.

    Just lilttle highlight on sikh women.

    "
    The role of Punjabi women as commandos on the battlefield is no less glorious. Sada Kaur, the mother-in-law of teenaged Ranjit Singh, shadowed her son-in-law in all his major engagements against the Mughals especially after the Afghans had routed the Marathas at Panipat and became so powerful, that the Moghul throne survived but only under their duress. She is remembered as one of the greatest generals of her time even in the Afghan records.
    Rani Sahib Kaur, sister of the infant ruler Sahib Singh of Patiala, successfully defended her brother's kingdom against the attacks of the Marathas, Afghans and European adventurers like George Thompson and chased them away from the battlefield.
    In the Sikh Ardas, God's name is taken thrice at the mention of 40 Muktas. Mukta is a word derived from mukti or moksh which means' release from the bondage of maya. These forty souls would have been remembered as black sheep, but for the intervention and action of a Punjabi lady called Mai Bhago. Pressed by the Moghuls, Guru Gobind Singh was leading his small force through guerilla routes towards the desert areas of Punjab around Khiderana, so that for lack of victuals and water, the large Moghul force would become inoperative. The hardships caused to the Sikh force in this inhospitable tract were no less painful. Under the strain of the misery forty war-riors of the Guru's force led by their commander, Mahan Singh, wrote a note of desertion to the Guru and fled the field. However as they reached their houses, their womenfolk, under the influence of Mai Bhago, refused to let them enter their homes and lamented at them endlessly, "You wear the bangles and run the kitchen while we join the Guru on the battle-field." The taunt proved too sharp for the erstwhile warriors who decided to return to the Guru and to the battlefield. Mai Bhago took them under her command on their return journey, to ensure that they would not escape somewhere else.

    By the time these forty saint soldiers, under their female commander reached Khiderana , the Guru was already engaged in a battle with the Moghul forces. Mai Bhago's band surprised the Moghul commander, who was already being stiffly tried by the Guru's forces. By the time he decided to run from the field, only wounded Mahan Singh was left alive gasping for breath. The bodies of others, including that of Mai Bhago lay dead on the battlefield. Soon the Guru was at Mahan Singh's side; "Be so gracious as to tear our note of desertion", were the last words he uttered before his Guru as he breathed his last Because of Mal Bhago's sacrifice, the dune of Khiderana is the flourishing city called Muktsar, the giver of redemption.
    "

    Source && furture reading :
    http://www.sikh-heritage.co.uk/heritage/WoP/womenofPunjab.htm
     
  9. Amerikaur

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    This is just my opinion as to how I perceive the difference.

    The word for lioness is singhni.

    Guru Gobind Singh also wanted women to have a distinct and seperate identity of their own. And in giving the name "Kaur" to women instead of "Singhni" he did exactly that.

    It is somewhat common for Sikhs, particluarly those that speak some Panjabi, to refer to a Sikh woman (women) as Singhni (Singhnia), but "Singhni" is never taken in place of "Kaur" as a lady's name.
     
  10. CaramelChocolate

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    This is an example of how sexism is coming into Sikh community in my opinion... reason why girls are kaur and not singhni is so that people cannot call them half a man as they can do with English words... feMALE... they are half a male or less.. so by calling then kaur it empowers them and gives them own identity, do you ever hear a man being called a raj [king] in Sikh community? I hope I have made my point clear...!
     
  11. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    IN additon to that...in MUSLIM RULED INDIA....it was forbidden for any one else other than a Muslim to keep a "knife", ride a horse, wear a Turban.
    Guur Gobind Singh Ji empowered ALL SIKHS..by making it compulsory for every Sikh to carry WEAPONS, and wear a Dastaar. Guru Ji was very happy to receive Sikhs on Fine Horses and having weapons. IN fact the Sikh guurs, from Guru Hargobind Ji onwards made it a point ot buy and trade in the Best Arabian Horses..and weapons from as far as Damascus. Sikhs used to go to Afghanistan to buy horses. Guur Ji Gobind Singh ji had instructed his Sikhs to bring the best horses and the best weapons. he was presented Swords, Elephants, Rifles and such all the time.

    Now we dont ride horses but we still wear the dastaar and carry the Kirpan...shows Sikhism does change whenever change is Practical. Dastaar and Kirpan are still RELEVANT and therefore kept on.

    jarnail singh Gyani
     
  12. muneet

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    Turban originally derived from "kafan" meaning death shroud - old ages warriors set out with a shroud tied just in case they lost their life fighting their cause. A turbanned sikh is committed to his Guru's way of life and has tied the kafan as agreement. Hair is another part of sikh identity- the sikh finds his roots by first accepting his basic form, he does not meddle with it . Not cutting hair is like having given up rights to your head and the mind within!!- easier said than done and easier done just only by not cutting hair than by actually giving up being a manmukh!!!!!!!!
     

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