Welcome to SPN

Register and Join the most happening forum of Sikh community & intellectuals from around the world.

Sign Up Now!

Philosophical (Western) Taoist and the Sikh.

Discussion in 'Interfaith Dialogues' started by Ozarks, Jul 4, 2009.

  1. Ozarks

    Ozarks
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    79
    Sat Sri Akal

    I was contemplating the nature of Waheguru this morning and comparing (my) today's (ever changing) understanding to thoughts I have had in the past. In doing so I was thinking about the Tao. And the more I tried to contrast what I have learned of Sikhism to the Taoist way the harder it became. Admittedly Sikhism goes further than the Tao Te Ching, however I see that they are often in agreement even if their approaches are (at least superficially) different.
    If I stepped on toes I didn't mean to I would just like to hear opinions or site examples of where I am way off base.
    (Please keep in mind the philosophical nature of the Tao is what I'm talking about not the Chinese folk religion part that as attached itself to the original philosophy.)
     
    • Like Like x 3
  2. Loading...

    Similar Threads Forum Date
    Atheism Sikhism and Atheism: A Philosophical Discourse Interfaith Dialogues Jun 29, 2009

  3. Ozarks

    Ozarks
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    79
    Thank you Namjap Ji. That is very helpful!

    This morning (my most poetic/spiritual time) I thought that and introduction to the Tao is like plowing the fields of the mind. But like a plowed field the mind seeks more than just to be prepared. The Tao tends to leave you wanting more. It may bring a peace to the mind, a sense of understanding, but then leaves it in contemplation. Most often the heart desires an active practice. That is where and why Chinese folk religion(s) attached themselves to the Tao. But what if that next step is not the step into Chinese folk religion but what if it is to the Guru Granth Sahib? With the Guru Granth Sahib as a guide to prayer and further contemplation the mind that has been brought to an understanding is further enriched. The heart that desires participation is rewarded. Both having sought and found a connection with the divine. I feel that when Lao Tzu wrote he was bringing it to the curious mind. Guru Nanak brought it to the heart.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  4. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
    Expand Collapse
    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
    Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,578
    Likes Received:
    1,606
    Self

    Both praise and blame cause concern,
    For they bring people hope and fear.
    The object of hope and fear is the self

    For, without self, to whom may fortune and disaster occur?

    Therefore,
    Who distinguishes himself from the world may be given the world,
    But who regards himself as the world may accept the world.

    Agreed.

    Page 290, Line 19
    ਤਬ ਹਰਖ ਸੋਗ ਕਹੁ ਕਿਸਹਿ ਬਿਆਪਤ ॥
    तब हरख सोग कहु किसहि बिआपत ॥
    Ŧab harakẖ sog kaho kisėh bi▫āpaṯ.
    then who experienced joy and sorrow?
    Guru Arjan Dev - [SIZE=-1]view Shabad/Paurhi/Salok

    Please read the full pauri to see the similarity of concept.
    [/SIZE]
     
    • Like Like x 3
    #4 Astroboy, Jul 5, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 5, 2016
  5. Josh martin

    Josh martin
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    12
    The heart that desires participation is rewarded[quote

    tell me more
     
  6. Ozarks

    Ozarks
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    79
    About the comparisons between the two? I had given some thought to a Tao verse by verse comparison to the Gurbani but thought that may be overkill (not to mention a bit long). But perhaps that is not so much of what you are after. What would you like to know more about the "why" I think this (from a philosophical/theological stand point) or direct comparison of the primary works (Tao Te Ching and the Siri Guru Granth Sahib)?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    I would think Ozarks ji that either way to answer would add to the conversation. You decide.
     
  8. Josh martin

    Josh martin
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    12
    I am not really interested in comparison between these religions. I am more interested in knowing more about the line I quoted

    The heart that desires participation is rewarded[quote
     
  9. Ozarks

    Ozarks
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    79
    I'm sorry Josh, I misunderstood. :eek: If I may I will quote myself:

    "With the Guru Granth Sahib as a guide to prayer and further contemplation the mind that has been brought to an understanding is further enriched. The heart that desires participation is rewarded. Both having sought and found a connection with the divine."

    It is my belief that the Way is in fact the natural order and the natural order is a reflection of the will of the Creator. As humans we tend to deceive ourselves by living our lives holding a mirror in front of our faces. This leads us to believe that we (or the all mighty "Me") is the center of all things. This leads us to put our desires and plans ahead of anyone else and ahead of the natural order, or the Creator's Will. This leads to a disharmony/discord. Disharmony will (eventually) turn on itself as a form of correction. This can lead to ruined plans, attitudes or lives.

    If however we put down the mirror and see the Creation for what it is we may learn from it's Divine Harmony. (Divine because it reflects the Will of the Divine.) If we life my that harmony alone our lives would be much improved. We would be at a greater peace with ourselves. This is more in line with the animals in nature. (I know the argument that (all) animals don't live in peace. However they tend not to be self destructive and are driven by basic needs as opposed to feeding the ego.)

    But we, as humans, have the opportunity to not only see the natural order, but to give thanks and try to reach an even higher connection the the Creator of that order. In order to try to do that we have created theologies to attempt to begin to understand the Creator. My comparison of the Tao Te Ching and the Siri Guru Granth Sahib is positing that the Tao is a reflection of the Natural Order to attempt to become harmonious and glimpse the Will of the Creator, while the Siri Guru Granth Sahib points to the natural order in celebration of the Creator for the Creation. One flows naturally into the other. The Tao Te Ching prepares the mind, the Siri Guru Granth Sahib the heart.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Josh martin

    Josh martin
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    12
    I think I agree with you here. Sant Atar singh ji in sabha in Shiri harmandir sahib said thats its not control(keep it still) ones "Mun" by force. The real way; by following the, i like how u put it here, "natural" order Mun naturally flows into state called "Vus".

    While Guru Sahib ji say that who which went(did something) to find God by themselves(without Guru) lost themselves.(might go in detail if asked)

    Natural order, from my understanding, is the ever-so Nirmal Gursikhi, where Guru, by his grace shows us that God is in our own home/heart.
    Divine Harmony also known as Hukam/bhana/will of the creater is one of early powri's in japji Sahib and If I may be bold enough, one of the foundations of Sikhism.


    This seems little confusing? Your response and I try to go back to heart that desire participation.
     
  11. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    Ozarks ji

    You may be grappling here with our own conceptualization of Dharma and its meaning in the broad, not the narrow, sense.

    In the earliest veda, the Rigveda, Dharma represents the concept of justice and harmony in the natural order -- which is Divine because it is the order that lies behind the laws of nature. From that vantage point Dharma then comes to mean the just or righteous path and takes on ethical meaning as well as a metaphysical meaning. Dharma is believed in the "dharmic" faiths part of each stage of spiritual development, and as such is the way by which we filter our interactions with all of the natural and social environment.

    Within Sikhism, Dharma means the path of righteousness, and it is revealed through our actions and deeds, i.e., how we filter our interactions with all natural and social environments, in a way that is consistent with the teachings of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Maharaj ji.

    My understanding.
     
  12. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
    Expand Collapse
    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
    Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,578
    Likes Received:
    1,606
    2,500 years ago, the Chinese philosopher Confucius asked Lao-tzu, the founder of Taoism, "What is Tao?" Lao-tzu opened his mouth but said nothing. Confucius left with a smile, but his students were puzzled. Confucius explained, "Lao-tzu has passed us the Tao. In his mouth, there are no teeth but only a tongue. The hard ones (teeth) died, but the soft one (the tongue) lives; the soft power is stronger than the hard power. That's the Tao!"

    Open source is such a soft power. "Soft power is like water," Lao-tzu explained in his book, Tao Te Ching. A single water drop is powerless, but numerous water drops are torrential. Likewise, a single open source participant counts for little, but numerous participants make the open source community strong. Traditional software, on the other hand, is a hard power, like teeth. One big tooth can be strong (take Microsoft, for example), but teeth fall out as time goes by.


    Sorry guys, I couldn't find an example from SGGS which compliments this water and stone relationship. But this is what I found so far:-

    ਪਾਥਰ ਕਉ ਬਹੁ ਨੀਰੁ ਪਵਾਇਆ
    पाथर कउ बहु नीरु पवाइआ ॥
    Pāthar ka▫o baho nīr pavā▫i▫ā.
    Stones may be kept under water for a long time.

    ਨਹ ਭੀਗੈ ਅਧਿਕ ਸੂਕਾਇਆ ॥੨॥
    नह भीगै अधिक सूकाइआ ॥२॥
    Nah bẖīgai aḏẖik sūkā▫i▫ā. ||2||
    Even so, they do not absorb the water; they remain hard and dry. ||2||
     
    #12 Astroboy, Aug 1, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 5, 2016
  13. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    NamJap ji

    " Confucius asked Lao-tzu, the founder of Taoism, "What is Tao?" Lao-tzu opened his mouth but said nothing. Confucius left with a smile, but his students were puzzled. Confucius explained, "Lao-tzu has passed us the Tao. In his mouth, there are no teeth but only a tongue. The hard ones (teeth) died, but the soft one (the tongue) lives; the soft power is stronger than the hard power. That's the Tao!" "

    Tao, unlike Buddhism, is not a metaphysical system or philosophy. Tao is a practical path of wisdom crafted from the experiences of people in rising to the challenges of time and space. These two Buddhism and Taoism should not be confused.

    Soft and hard, teeth and tongue, many and one, are and is not, died and lives are all part of this Confucian story of Lao Tzu the "founder" of Tao. As opposing concepts these complement one another and create totality, but the totality created is a union of opposites. Thus, Tao, unlike Buddhism, is a practical path of wisdom crafted from the experiences of people in rising to the challenges of ordinary time and space.Tao is culturally compatible with Buddhism but is not the same.

    The reason nothing from Gurbani comes to mind may be the result of the proposition of opposites in the Tao. The Tao depends on the resolution of opposites in a system that accepts duality, seeks to equalize within duality, and does not reach beyond duality. In Gurbani the dissolution of opposites and thus the dissolution of duality becomes a mark of wisdom.

    ਇਕਸੁ ਤੇ ਹੋਇਓ ਅਨੰਤਾ ਨਾਨਕ ਏਕਸੁ ਮਾਹਿ ਸਮਾਏ ਜੀਉ ॥੯॥੨॥੩੬॥
    eikas thae hoeiou ananthaa naanak eaekas maahi samaaeae jeeo ||9||2||36||
    From oneness, He has brought forth the countless multitudes. O Nanak, they shall merge into the One once again. ||9||2||36||
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
    Expand Collapse
    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
    Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,578
    Likes Received:
    1,606
    Wu wei is a central concept in Taoism. The literal meaning of wu wei is "without action". Its often expressed by the paradox wei wu wei, meaning "action without action" or "effortless doing". The practice and efficacy of wu wei are fundamental in Chinese thought, most prominently emphasized in Taoism. The goal of wu wei is alignment with Tao, revealing the soft and unseen power within all things.

    Excerpts from Taoism and Art of Wing Chun By Adam Williss
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    NamJap ji

    I don't know if you find this link useful or appropriate in the thread. Wuwei Foundation

    See if it works. If not, delete it.
     
  16. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
    Expand Collapse
    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
    Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,578
    Likes Received:
    1,606
    Narayanjot Kaur Ji,




    Here's an article that caught my attention:-

    Every living being is full of faith, or he could not live.

    Faith is in the atmosphere and we live by using it, just as a fish lives by using the water.
    Faith springs eternal in every human breast, fed from the universal source.
    To talk of one’s little faith or one’s much faith is like talking of the earth's squareness.

    Every soul lives by faith and plenty of it. But he lives by faith in what? There’s the rub.
    Until we emerge from a sense of materiality—and no one has as yet got more than his nose
    above these muddy waters— we live by faith in things seen, smelt, tasted, heard and felt.
    These are the only things we are familiar with; to them we pin our faith, and pride ourselves
    upon our good sense, reason and lack of “superstition.”

    “I can't believe in anything unless I can see it” is our self-satisfied cry; “you can't fool me with
    your religious hocus-pocus, nor with your rabbit's foot and horseshoe and four-leaved clover;
    I can see no connection between a rabbit’s foot and your good luck, therefore I know no connection exists;
    I can see no big God on a great white throne, consequently I know none exists; show me your God;
    show me the string which connects the four-leaved clover to your good luck and I’ll put my faith in it.”

    The material one reckons without his Unseen Host. By and by the Unseen begins to juggle with him.
    His beautiful plans, every step of which he could plainly see, are blown awry. He can’t see why!
    The things in which he had such faith begin to totter and tumble about his ears. He can’t see why!
    Reluctantly he begins to see that there are mighty forces he can’t see. His whole beautiful material world
    begins to dance to strings he can’t see!

    Ah, so there are things he can't see, hear, smell, taste or feel! They may be a fearful and chaotic jumble;
    they seem to be; but they are there, after all his certainty that he could see, smell, hear, taste
    and feel The Whole Thing.

    And he begins to reach out toward these unseen things. He peers and peers into the darkness and stillness.
    And as he peers his faiths gradually loosen their hold upon the old visible things and begin to reach out
    into the darkness and silence.

    He sends his faiths groping, groping, feeling their way through the Invisible, always seeking the strings to which
    visible things have been dancing and tumbling.

    At first all is darkness; but by and by faith gets its tentacles around Something Unseen;—ah,
    there is Something which disposes what man proposes—an unseen, un-tasted, unheard,
    un-smelt, unfelt Something.

    A terrible Something it may be, but still a Something, all-powerful, all-present.
    He has sent his feelers into the Invisible and touched God, the soul, the life-principle,
    which makes and unmakes, gives and takes away all those little things to which he was wont to pin his faiths.

    The next thing is to find out the nature of this mighty Something whose home is in the Invisible.
    But how find out the nature of the Unseen? Not by touch, taste, smell, sight or hearing—not at first anyway.
    But by its fruits you may know a tree to be good or bad.

    By its fruits you may know the invisible powers to be beneficent or malefic.
    And the material one is familiar with fruits, with things. He built such beautiful things himself,
    so he ought to be a judge of the fruits of labor. The fruits of his labor were all good, he knows they were.
    If only the great Unseen had not spoiled them all! Oh, the labors of the Unseen brought
    his own good efforts to naught—the Unseen must be a terrible and evil power;
    its fruits are destruction of his own good buildings. He fears this Great Unseen Power to which
    his faiths are beginning to pin themselves.

    But wait: Good is beginning to rise from the ashes of his ruins.
    This so terrible calamity is turning out a blessing! New and greater things are forming,
    to take the places of the lost fruits! And they are good.

    Oh, this Great Unseen works in terrifying mystery but its fruits are good.
    Now he is ready to “come unto God.” He begins to see the un-seeable things, and his faiths tendril them.
    Those who would “come unto Him must believe that He is, and that
    He is a rewarder of them that diligently seek Him.”

    Those who would understand and feel and use the invisible forces
    must believe that they are, and that they reward those who diligently seek to understand and use them.

    The Unseen things move the visible world. The material one being pinned by his faiths to the things of the world
    is moved as the world is moved. He is a mere puppet in the hands of the Unseen powers.

    As he looses the faiths which bound him to the world rack, and sends his faith tendrils into the Unseen,
    he becomes one with the powers which pull the world-strings.

    “Faith is the sub-stance (the underlying and creating principle) of things hoped for,
    the evidence of things not seen.”

    The material one’s faith is pinned to things already seen; therefore, his creative principle is
    poured into the thing already created.

    Then Life juggles and tumbles things until the material one’s faiths are torn loose from their
    material moorings, and go feeling out into the Unseen for new things to cling to.
    When the whole bunch of visible things has failed us; when houses, lands, money, friends,
    and even fathers and mothers and brothers and sisters have gone back on us, what is there left to pin
    our faiths to? And without something to have faith in how could we live at all?

    We couldn’t live without faiths to steady us; witness the suicides and the deaths from broken hearts.
    And if all visible things have failed us, if our faiths are broken loose from fathers, mothers, brothers,
    friends, houses and lands, where else can our faiths take hold again
    except in the region of the Unseen?—the region where “the wind bloweth whither it listeth
    and thou canst hear the sound thereof but canst not tell whence it cometh nor whither it goeth;”
    the region of substance, of creative power.

    It seems very terrible to have our faiths broken loose from fathers, mothers, brothers, friends,
    houses and lands; but it is good for us, as time always proves.

    Broken loose from the effects of creative energy, our faiths reach out into the Unseen and tendril
    the very energy itself. From a state of oneness with things we evolve a new being at
    one with the creative power within things.

    What are the unseen things to which our torn faiths begin to attach themselves?
    Our faith itself is unseen, the sub-stance of things hoped for, the substantial evidence of things not yet seen.

    What do we hope for that we have not yet seen?
    First of all we hope for peace—another of the substantial unseen things.
    We hope for love, the most substantial of unseen things.
    Oh, if we had but peace and love we could count all else well lost!
    And behold, by unseen faith tendrils our bruised faiths attach themselves to the unseen substance of
    peace and love.

    Wisdom is an unseen substance—our unseen faiths attach themselves to
    the unseen source of wisdom. Thought is unseen; our faiths, torn loose from things,
    begin to reach out into the unseen realm of thought. Ideals are unseen things.
    Our faiths, torn loose from the already-realized, begin to tendril the unseen ideals,
    the race's ideals, the family ideals, and lastly our individual ideals.

    Our unseen faiths become one with these unseen ideals; and through these
    little faith tendrils we begin literally to draw the ideal down into our physical being
    and out into the visible world.

    Through our faith tendrils the ideal is literally ex-pressed, pressed out into visibility.
    When our faiths were attached to material things, the material things (being negative to us) sucked us dry.
    Now our faith tendrils reach upward to the unseen ideal realm of real substance (to which we are negative)
    and by the same law of dynamics it is we who draw the life; draw it from the unseen realm of real life substance.

    Of ourselves we could do nothing—the things to which our faiths attached us sucked us dry of power,
    and the unseen powers finally tore us loose; but now that we are tendriled by our faiths to the
    Unseen, “the Father” in us and through us doeth the works of rightness that bring peace.

    And behold, we are filled with the unseen power, and through our faith in the Unseen
    we pass on the fruits of the spirit, which are “love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness,
    meekness, faith, temperance.”

    And being filled with the power of the Unseen we pass on the fruits of the spirit to fathers,
    mothers, brothers, friends, houses, lands; pass it on in every act of life and in every breath we take.

    We breathe out that which, through our faith-tendrils, the Great Unseen breathes into us.
    Then, behold, that which is written comes to pass:
    “Ye shall have an hundredfold more houses and lands and fathers
    and mothers and brothers in this present time.”
    You shall have them to use at will.

    While you were attached by your faiths to things they used you; now you use them.
    Pin your faiths to the Unseen things and let patience have her perfect work.
    So shall you realize your heart’s full desire. Let things rock as they will;
    let facts be stubborn and conditions hard if need be. Never mind them.
    To mind them is to pin your faiths to them.

    Mind the Unseen things. Pin your faiths to your ideals.
    Flout facts and hard conditions! Believe in the Unseen.
    Train your faiths upward.
    “Whatsoever ye desire believe that ye receive,” and you shall surely have it.
    If it is a mushroom expect it in a night. If you desire a great oak give it time to grow.
    In due time, perhaps in an hour when you least expect it, it will surely appear.

    The one thing needful is to pin your little faiths to the Unseen Source of all things.
    Believe in the great unseen part of yourself and the universal.

    http://www.yourlifepower.com/life-power-substance-of-things.html
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
    Expand Collapse
    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
    Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,578
    Likes Received:
    1,606
    Tao Te Ching: Chapter 11
    translated by Stephen Mitchell

    We join spokes together in a wheel,
    but it is the center hole
    that makes the wagon move.
    We shape clay into a pot,
    but it is the emptiness inside
    that holds whatever we want.
    We hammer wood for a house,
    but it is the inner space
    that makes it livable.
    We work with being
    but non-being is what we use.



    ....................................................


    Tao Te Ching: Chapter 11
    translated by Ursula K. Le Guin

    Thirty spokes
    meet in the hub.
    Where the wheel isn't
    is where it's useful.
    Hollowed out,
    clay makes a pot.
    Where the pot's not
    is where it's useful.
    Cut doors and windows
    to make a room.
    Where the room isn't,
    there's room for you.
    So the profit in what is
    is in the use of what isn't.
     
  18. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    NamJap ji

    That poem in red font is really a very interesting work. Worth studying because it has puzzles inside of a larger puzzle. It also seems to have some real ethical content. Thanks for that and more to think about. :wah:
     
  19. Ozarks

    Ozarks
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    79
    Narayanjot Ji,
    If I may... I feel that the Tao does not seek a resolution but through wu wei allows the illusion of duality to prove itself by not remaining "out of balance" and becoming what is intended and harmony is the result.

    We tend to describe and understand things as have dual natures because we tend to be reactionary selfish creatures. One action may be viewed in totally opposite ways depending on the person viewing it. The wise person accepts that the thing happened and the reality of the situation at hand and does not view it from a personal/egotistical perspective.

    Cultivate harmony within yourself, and harmony becomes real;
    Cultivate harmony within your family, and harmony becomes fertile;
    Cultivate harmony within your community, and harmony becomes abundant;
    Cultivate harmony within your culture, and harmony becomes enduring;
    Cultivate harmony within the world, and harmony becomes ubiquitous.

    Live with a person to understand that person;
    Live with a family to understand that family;
    Live with a community to understand that community;
    Live with a culture to understand that culture;
    Live with the world to understand the world.

    How can I live with the world?
    By accepting.
    - Chapter 54 of the Tao Te Ching

    I would like to also quote the final chapter of the Tao Te Ching. There, I believe, you will find a sentiment echoed by the Gurus and sought by the wise.

    Honest people use no rhetoric;
    Rhetoric is not honesty.
    Enlightened people are not cultured;
    Culture is not enlightenment.
    Content people are not wealthy;
    Wealth is not contentment.

    So the sage does not serve himself;
    The more he does for others, the more he is satisfied;
    The more he gives, the more he receives.
    Nature flourishes at the expense of no one;
    So the sage benefits all men and contends with none.
    - Chapter 81 of the Tao Te Ching
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Astroboy

    Astroboy Malaysia
    Expand Collapse
    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
    Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,578
    Likes Received:
    1,606
    Conquer with Inaction

    Guys, I'll let out a secret. Conquer women with inaction works wonders for me.
    Earlier I fell for the chase because women will lure men to pursue them and play hard to get.
    Reverse the formula, first by having more self-control. Then work on your subtlety.
    Concentrate on your character, personality, knowledge, communication skills and have a sense of humor.
    Remember, women are turned on by men's smells like cologne, etc. (not overpowering smells but subtle smells).

    Also consult the following link:-

    Secrets of women - AskMen.com
     

Share This Page