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Open Exclusive

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Darrell, Jul 28, 2006.

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  1. Darrell

    Darrell
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    Guest

    I have been asked to prevent two users from having access to an Access
    mdb database simultaneously. This presents 2 questions to my mind which
    I have never specifically addressed.

    1. How does one do this?
    2. More generally, what, exactly does Open Exclusive do?

    Thank you for any and all help.

    Darrell
     
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  3. david.isaacks@mail.va.gov

    david.isaacks@mail.va.gov
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    Guest

    To open the database with exclusive (exclusive: A type of access to
    data in a database that is shared over a network. When you open a
    database in exclusive mode, you prevent others from opening the
    database.) access, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    click Open Exclusive.

    To open the database for read-only access and also prevent other users
    from opening it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    click Open Exclusive Read-Only.

    To open the database for shared access in a multiuser (multiuser
    (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access
    and modify the same set of data at the same time.) environment, so you
    and other users can read and write to the database, click Open.

    To open the database for read-only access so that you can view it but
    cannot edit it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click
    Open Read-Only.

    David

    Darrell wrote:
    > I have been asked to prevent two users from having access to an Access
    > mdb database simultaneously. This presents 2 questions to my mind which
    > I have never specifically addressed.
    >
    > 1. How does one do this?
    > 2. More generally, what, exactly does Open Exclusive do?
    >
    > Thank you for any and all help.
    >
    > Darrell
     
  4. Joseph Meehan

    Joseph Meehan
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    Guest

    Darrell wrote:
    > I have been asked to prevent two users from having access to an Access
    > mdb database simultaneously. This presents 2 questions to my mind
    > which I have never specifically addressed.
    >
    > 1. How does one do this?
    > 2. More generally, what, exactly does Open Exclusive do?
    >
    > Thank you for any and all help.
    >
    > Darrell


    Your question does bring up the question of what the "asker" really
    wants to do. I find it unusual, to say the least, that someone would really
    want only one person to be able to access Access at a time. There would
    seem to be little reason to do so when the users may each access it at
    different times. My guess is they have experienced some sort of problem
    when more than one user was accessing it at the same time. I would tend to
    believe it would be better to resolve the problem than to cripple the
    program to prevent it.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
  5. Darrell

    Darrell
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    Guest

    David,

    Thank you for the response. However, an experiment conducted on this
    basis did not yield the described results. One person opened the
    database in Exclusive mode as described below and I followed by opening
    the database and did everything, including re-designing a table. Any
    explanation for this which would point to, perhaps, any other hidden
    factors?

    Darrell

    david.isaacks@mail.va.gov wrote:
    > To open the database with exclusive (exclusive: A type of access to
    > data in a database that is shared over a network. When you open a
    > database in exclusive mode, you prevent others from opening the
    > database.) access, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    > click Open Exclusive.
    >
    > To open the database for read-only access and also prevent other users
    > from opening it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    > click Open Exclusive Read-Only.
    >
    > To open the database for shared access in a multiuser (multiuser
    > (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access
    > and modify the same set of data at the same time.) environment, so you
    > and other users can read and write to the database, click Open.
    >
    > To open the database for read-only access so that you can view it but
    > cannot edit it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click
    > Open Read-Only.
    >
    > David
    >
    > Darrell wrote:
    >> I have been asked to prevent two users from having access to an Access
    >> mdb database simultaneously. This presents 2 questions to my mind which
    >> I have never specifically addressed.
    >>
    >> 1. How does one do this?
    >> 2. More generally, what, exactly does Open Exclusive do?
    >>
    >> Thank you for any and all help.
    >>
    >> Darrell

    >
     
  6. Darrell

    Darrell
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I agree wholeheartedly. However, that is what the users requested and,
    it was on the basis that they change and re-change each others' entries.
    As you so correctly pointed out, there is nothing preventing them from
    doing this in alternating "Opens", but, that was their request, so I'm
    attempting to accommodate it.

    Thank you for your input.

    Darrell

    Joseph Meehan wrote:
    > Darrell wrote:
    >> I have been asked to prevent two users from having access to an Access
    >> mdb database simultaneously. This presents 2 questions to my mind
    >> which I have never specifically addressed.
    >>
    >> 1. How does one do this?
    >> 2. More generally, what, exactly does Open Exclusive do?
    >>
    >> Thank you for any and all help.
    >>
    >> Darrell

    >
    > Your question does bring up the question of what the "asker" really
    > wants to do. I find it unusual, to say the least, that someone would really
    > want only one person to be able to access Access at a time. There would
    > seem to be little reason to do so when the users may each access it at
    > different times. My guess is they have experienced some sort of problem
    > when more than one user was accessing it at the same time. I would tend to
    > believe it would be better to resolve the problem than to cripple the
    > program to prevent it.
    >
     
  7. Douglas J. Steele

    Douglas J. Steele
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    What version of Access are you using, Darrell? Is your application split
    into a front-end (containing the queries, forms, reports, macros and
    modules) linked to a back-end (containing the tables and relationships)? If
    your user opened his front-end and you worked on the back-end, then what you
    described could still occur.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no e-mails, please!)


    "Darrell" <dcyphers@llu.edu> wrote in message
    news:eIZ2Er1qGHA.2448@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
    > David,
    >
    > Thank you for the response. However, an experiment conducted on this
    > basis did not yield the described results. One person opened the
    > database in Exclusive mode as described below and I followed by opening
    > the database and did everything, including re-designing a table. Any
    > explanation for this which would point to, perhaps, any other hidden
    > factors?
    >
    > Darrell
    >
    > david.isaacks@mail.va.gov wrote:
    > > To open the database with exclusive (exclusive: A type of access to
    > > data in a database that is shared over a network. When you open a
    > > database in exclusive mode, you prevent others from opening the
    > > database.) access, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    > > click Open Exclusive.
    > >
    > > To open the database for read-only access and also prevent other users
    > > from opening it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    > > click Open Exclusive Read-Only.
    > >
    > > To open the database for shared access in a multiuser (multiuser
    > > (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access
    > > and modify the same set of data at the same time.) environment, so you
    > > and other users can read and write to the database, click Open.
    > >
    > > To open the database for read-only access so that you can view it but
    > > cannot edit it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click
    > > Open Read-Only.
    > >
    > > David
    > >
    > > Darrell wrote:
    > >> I have been asked to prevent two users from having access to an Access
    > >> mdb database simultaneously. This presents 2 questions to my mind which
    > >> I have never specifically addressed.
    > >>
    > >> 1. How does one do this?
    > >> 2. More generally, what, exactly does Open Exclusive do?
    > >>
    > >> Thank you for any and all help.
    > >>
    > >> Darrell

    > >
     
  8. gumby

    gumby
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Try setting your tools/options/advanced/ to Exclusive mode.

    Specify whether a Microsoft Access database opens in shared or
    exclusive mode by default.

    Under Default open mode, do one of the following:
    If you want others to be able to open the Microsoft Access database
    (Microsoft Access database: click Shared.

    If you want sole access to the Access database when you have it open,
    click Exclusive.


    Also is this database split?

    David


    Darrell wrote:
    > David,
    >
    > Thank you for the response. However, an experiment conducted on this
    > basis did not yield the described results. One person opened the
    > database in Exclusive mode as described below and I followed by opening
    > the database and did everything, including re-designing a table. Any
    > explanation for this which would point to, perhaps, any other hidden
    > factors?
    >
    > Darrell
    >
    > david.isaacks@mail.va.gov wrote:
    > > To open the database with exclusive (exclusive: A type of access to
    > > data in a database that is shared over a network. When you open a
    > > database in exclusive mode, you prevent others from opening the
    > > database.) access, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    > > click Open Exclusive.
    > >
    > > To open the database for read-only access and also prevent other users
    > > from opening it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    > > click Open Exclusive Read-Only.
    > >
    > > To open the database for shared access in a multiuser (multiuser
    > > (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access
    > > and modify the same set of data at the same time.) environment, so you
    > > and other users can read and write to the database, click Open.
    > >
    > > To open the database for read-only access so that you can view it but
    > > cannot edit it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click
    > > Open Read-Only.
    > >
    > > David
    > >
    > > Darrell wrote:
    > >> I have been asked to prevent two users from having access to an Access
    > >> mdb database simultaneously. This presents 2 questions to my mind which
    > >> I have never specifically addressed.
    > >>
    > >> 1. How does one do this?
    > >> 2. More generally, what, exactly does Open Exclusive do?
    > >>
    > >> Thank you for any and all help.
    > >>
    > >> Darrell

    > >
     
  9. Darrell

    Darrell
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Douglas J. Steele wrote:
    > What version of Access are you using, Darrell? Is your application split
    > into a front-end (containing the queries, forms, reports, macros and
    > modules) linked to a back-end (containing the tables and relationships)? If
    > your user opened his front-end and you worked on the back-end, then what you
    > described could still occur.
    >

    Thanks for the response. I'm using Access 2003. And, the application is
    a single mdb file (there is no back/front split).

    Darrell
     
  10. Darrell

    Darrell
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    gumby wrote:
    > Try setting your tools/options/advanced/ to Exclusive mode.
    >
    > Specify whether a Microsoft Access database opens in shared or
    > exclusive mode by default.
    >
    > Under Default open mode, do one of the following:
    > If you want others to be able to open the Microsoft Access database
    > (Microsoft Access database: click Shared.
    >
    > If you want sole access to the Access database when you have it open,
    > click Exclusive.
    >
    >
    > Also is this database split?
    >
    > David
    >
    >
    > Darrell wrote:
    >> David,
    >>
    >> Thank you for the response. However, an experiment conducted on this
    >> basis did not yield the described results. One person opened the
    >> database in Exclusive mode as described below and I followed by opening
    >> the database and did everything, including re-designing a table. Any
    >> explanation for this which would point to, perhaps, any other hidden
    >> factors?
    >>
    >> Darrell
    >>
    >> david.isaacks@mail.va.gov wrote:
    >>> To open the database with exclusive (exclusive: A type of access to
    >>> data in a database that is shared over a network. When you open a
    >>> database in exclusive mode, you prevent others from opening the
    >>> database.) access, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    >>> click Open Exclusive.
    >>>
    >>> To open the database for read-only access and also prevent other users
    >>> from opening it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    >>> click Open Exclusive Read-Only.
    >>>
    >>> To open the database for shared access in a multiuser (multiuser
    >>> (shared) database: A database that permits more than one user to access
    >>> and modify the same set of data at the same time.) environment, so you
    >>> and other users can read and write to the database, click Open.
    >>>
    >>> To open the database for read-only access so that you can view it but
    >>> cannot edit it, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click
    >>> Open Read-Only.
    >>>
    >>> David
    >>>
    >>> Darrell wrote:
    >>>> I have been asked to prevent two users from having access to an Access
    >>>> mdb database simultaneously. This presents 2 questions to my mind which
    >>>> I have never specifically addressed.
    >>>>
    >>>> 1. How does one do this?
    >>>> 2. More generally, what, exactly does Open Exclusive do?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thank you for any and all help.
    >>>>
    >>>> Darrell

    >

    Thanks, David, for your response. Douglas Steele asked about the
    front/back split as well. This particular database is not split. And, we
    have tried the tools/options/advanced route as well.

    Darrell
     
  11. Douglas J. Steele

    Douglas J. Steele
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    Guest

    Any shared application should be split. However, that doesn't address your
    problem, does it?

    Are you sure you both were using the same database? Access 2003 won't allow
    you to change table definitions unless you're the only user.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no private e-mails, please)


    "Darrell" <dcyphers@llu.edu> wrote in message
    news:%23rB6Z72qGHA.3648@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
    > Douglas J. Steele wrote:
    >> What version of Access are you using, Darrell? Is your application split
    >> into a front-end (containing the queries, forms, reports, macros and
    >> modules) linked to a back-end (containing the tables and relationships)?
    >> If
    >> your user opened his front-end and you worked on the back-end, then what
    >> you
    >> described could still occur.
    >>

    > Thanks for the response. I'm using Access 2003. And, the application is a
    > single mdb file (there is no back/front split).
    >
    > Darrell
     
  12. Darrell

    Darrell
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Douglas J. Steele wrote:
    > Any shared application should be split. However, that doesn't address your
    > problem, does it?
    >
    > Are you sure you both were using the same database? Access 2003 won't allow
    > you to change table definitions unless you're the only user.
    >

    Again, agreed. This is a "home grown" application created by the users
    and is accessed by only 2 people. Perhaps if it ever grows beyond its
    current volume of usage redesigning it into a split database would be in
    order.

    I should also clarify that I did not attempt to save design changes to
    the table. This would almost certainly not have been allowed. I was
    merely surprised to see that it would even allow me in to design view
    while in exclusive mode (since not allowing design changes without
    having exclusive access is not allowed, as you said, even in "regular"
    mode).

    As far as the same database goes, two of us opened the same database
    sitting at desks adjacent to one another, and we're both programmers.
    So, if we opened 2 separate databases, well... you draw your own
    conclusions about us.

    Now... we both checked the "Exclusive" radio button under "Default open
    mode" on the tools/options/advanced tab and also read the standard help
    which reads "To open the database with exclusive (exclusive: A type of
    access to data in a database that is shared over a network. When you
    open a database in exclusive mode, you prevent others from opening the
    database.) access, click the arrow next to the Open button, and then
    click Open Exclusive." subsequent to which we went through the Open
    dialog box to select "Exclusive" option as another approach to get the
    same intended result.

    It still allowed both of us to access the database and make data
    changes. In short, it behaved exactly as though we had not selected this
    option.

    Darrell
     

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