Welcome to SPN

Register and Join the most happening forum of Sikh community & intellectuals from around the world.

Sign Up Now!

ODBC security / Access to SQL

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Gina, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Gina

    Gina
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    We have a third party that houses our database. In order to run any reports,
    it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB and then import it into
    Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best. If we were to connect directly into
    the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through Access?

    This is a concern of management before giving any consideration to an ODBC
    connection.

    Side question: Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    can hold.
    --
    Gina
     
  2. Loading...


  3. '69 Camaro

    '69 Camaro
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Hi, Gina.

    > In order to run any reports,
    > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB


    SQL DB? Ah. Sybase SQL Server, the name of the relational database before
    Microsoft and Ashton-Tate ported it to Windows NT and Sybase renamed its
    version to Adaptive Server Enterprise.

    Just kidding. You mean _any_ relational database that uses SQL, since you
    would have named the product and the version you were using if you wanted a
    correct answer that applies to your situation.

    > and then import it into
    > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best.


    Most relational database engines have built-in utilities that make this as
    easy as snapping your fingers. If I knew which database engine you have, I
    could probably suggest the names of the utilities or techniques you should
    be using instead your cumbersome method.

    > If we were to connect directly into
    > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    > Access?


    It depends upon the permissions granted to the users by the DBA.
    Permissions can be as restrictive or as generous as necessary. Also, some
    drivers for ODBC connections allow for "read-only" access, such as Jet does,
    so you may be able to limit this on your end with a DSN setting, if that's
    what you're looking for.

    > Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    > can hold.


    It only holds one record, if it's a really big record. In other words, it's
    the size that counts, not how many times you try.

    Which database engine are you using (and version or edition), what's the
    storage capacity of the hard drives, and how large can the files be on the
    partitions holding the data files, indexes, and log files? If you're
    wondering about maximum capacity and you are using Microsoft's SQL Server or
    Oracle's non-express editions, non-personal editions, or non-Standard
    edition, then if the hard drives and files sizes could handle it, the
    database could store several terabytes of data. That's probably more than
    enough. On the other hand, the free express editions will hold up to four
    Gigabytes of data, which is a suitable capacity for the most common database
    applications.

    HTH.
    Gunny

    See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    info.


    "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:A74550E3-1FA3-4575-964E-C09F7F931867@microsoft.com...
    > We have a third party that houses our database. In order to run any
    > reports,
    > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB and then import it into
    > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best. If we were to connect directly
    > into
    > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    > Access?
    >
    > This is a concern of management before giving any consideration to an ODBC
    > connection.
    >
    > Side question: Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    > can hold.
    > --
    > Gina
     
  4. Gina

    Gina
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Thank you for your thorough response. You provided me with just the
    information I needed. Additional details below.

    The application is People Soft. Although we can run queries in People Soft
    it takes forever and day to run them. However, when we export the data and
    then import it into ACCESS, we can run reports very easily. But again, we
    are back to this daily export/import routine. I didn't see any reason why we
    could not just connect directly into the DB through ACCESS using an ODBC
    connection. However, as mentioned earlier, Managements concern was that
    there would be no security. I thought you should be able to put security in
    place, but I'm not the DBA. But as an Analyst, I'm used to just having the
    data at my fingertips.
    --
    Gina


    "'69 Camaro" wrote:

    > Hi, Gina.
    >
    > > In order to run any reports,
    > > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB

    >
    > SQL DB? Ah. Sybase SQL Server, the name of the relational database before
    > Microsoft and Ashton-Tate ported it to Windows NT and Sybase renamed its
    > version to Adaptive Server Enterprise.
    >
    > Just kidding. You mean _any_ relational database that uses SQL, since you
    > would have named the product and the version you were using if you wanted a
    > correct answer that applies to your situation.
    >
    > > and then import it into
    > > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best.

    >
    > Most relational database engines have built-in utilities that make this as
    > easy as snapping your fingers. If I knew which database engine you have, I
    > could probably suggest the names of the utilities or techniques you should
    > be using instead your cumbersome method.
    >
    > > If we were to connect directly into
    > > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    > > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    > > Access?

    >
    > It depends upon the permissions granted to the users by the DBA.
    > Permissions can be as restrictive or as generous as necessary. Also, some
    > drivers for ODBC connections allow for "read-only" access, such as Jet does,
    > so you may be able to limit this on your end with a DSN setting, if that's
    > what you're looking for.
    >
    > > Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    > > can hold.

    >
    > It only holds one record, if it's a really big record. In other words, it's
    > the size that counts, not how many times you try.
    >
    > Which database engine are you using (and version or edition), what's the
    > storage capacity of the hard drives, and how large can the files be on the
    > partitions holding the data files, indexes, and log files? If you're
    > wondering about maximum capacity and you are using Microsoft's SQL Server or
    > Oracle's non-express editions, non-personal editions, or non-Standard
    > edition, then if the hard drives and files sizes could handle it, the
    > database could store several terabytes of data. That's probably more than
    > enough. On the other hand, the free express editions will hold up to four
    > Gigabytes of data, which is a suitable capacity for the most common database
    > applications.
    >
    > HTH.
    > Gunny
    >
    > See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    > See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    > http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    > info.
    >
    >
    > "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:A74550E3-1FA3-4575-964E-C09F7F931867@microsoft.com...
    > > We have a third party that houses our database. In order to run any
    > > reports,
    > > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB and then import it into
    > > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best. If we were to connect directly
    > > into
    > > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    > > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    > > Access?
    > >
    > > This is a concern of management before giving any consideration to an ODBC
    > > connection.
    > >
    > > Side question: Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    > > can hold.
    > > --
    > > Gina

    >
    >
    >
     
  5. Gina

    Gina
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I just looked up People Soft on the internet. It looks like People Soft is
    not SQL based as I had thought. It looks like its Oracle based. Sorry for
    the misconception.
    --
    Gina


    "'69 Camaro" wrote:

    > Hi, Gina.
    >
    > > In order to run any reports,
    > > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB

    >
    > SQL DB? Ah. Sybase SQL Server, the name of the relational database before
    > Microsoft and Ashton-Tate ported it to Windows NT and Sybase renamed its
    > version to Adaptive Server Enterprise.
    >
    > Just kidding. You mean _any_ relational database that uses SQL, since you
    > would have named the product and the version you were using if you wanted a
    > correct answer that applies to your situation.
    >
    > > and then import it into
    > > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best.

    >
    > Most relational database engines have built-in utilities that make this as
    > easy as snapping your fingers. If I knew which database engine you have, I
    > could probably suggest the names of the utilities or techniques you should
    > be using instead your cumbersome method.
    >
    > > If we were to connect directly into
    > > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    > > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    > > Access?

    >
    > It depends upon the permissions granted to the users by the DBA.
    > Permissions can be as restrictive or as generous as necessary. Also, some
    > drivers for ODBC connections allow for "read-only" access, such as Jet does,
    > so you may be able to limit this on your end with a DSN setting, if that's
    > what you're looking for.
    >
    > > Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    > > can hold.

    >
    > It only holds one record, if it's a really big record. In other words, it's
    > the size that counts, not how many times you try.
    >
    > Which database engine are you using (and version or edition), what's the
    > storage capacity of the hard drives, and how large can the files be on the
    > partitions holding the data files, indexes, and log files? If you're
    > wondering about maximum capacity and you are using Microsoft's SQL Server or
    > Oracle's non-express editions, non-personal editions, or non-Standard
    > edition, then if the hard drives and files sizes could handle it, the
    > database could store several terabytes of data. That's probably more than
    > enough. On the other hand, the free express editions will hold up to four
    > Gigabytes of data, which is a suitable capacity for the most common database
    > applications.
    >
    > HTH.
    > Gunny
    >
    > See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    > See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    > http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    > info.
    >
    >
    > "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:A74550E3-1FA3-4575-964E-C09F7F931867@microsoft.com...
    > > We have a third party that houses our database. In order to run any
    > > reports,
    > > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB and then import it into
    > > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best. If we were to connect directly
    > > into
    > > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    > > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    > > Access?
    > >
    > > This is a concern of management before giving any consideration to an ODBC
    > > connection.
    > >
    > > Side question: Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    > > can hold.
    > > --
    > > Gina

    >
    >
    >
     
  6. '69 Camaro

    '69 Camaro
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Hi, Gina.

    PeopleSoft requires a relational database engine and can be supported by
    Oracle, MS SQL Server, Sybase, DB2, Informix, and SQLBase, so you just need
    to find out which one your organization is using. Talk to your DBA about
    getting connected securely. That means _never_ storing the User ID and
    password in an Access database to "make it easier on the user," as so many
    Access developers think is a good idea. Access databases are the first
    place hackers look, and find, login credentials for otherwise secure
    client/server databases.

    However, with a user DSN set up on each workstation, Access can securely
    connect to the database engine as long as the user supplies valid login
    credentials to authenticate once per session.

    HTH.
    Gunny

    See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    info.


    "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:D3D0F0D5-E3DB-4AEE-AFF7-8C356B9FA973@microsoft.com...
    >I just looked up People Soft on the internet. It looks like People Soft is
    > not SQL based as I had thought. It looks like its Oracle based. Sorry
    > for
    > the misconception.
    > --
    > Gina
    >
    >
    > "'69 Camaro" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi, Gina.
    >>
    >> > In order to run any reports,
    >> > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB

    >>
    >> SQL DB? Ah. Sybase SQL Server, the name of the relational database
    >> before
    >> Microsoft and Ashton-Tate ported it to Windows NT and Sybase renamed its
    >> version to Adaptive Server Enterprise.
    >>
    >> Just kidding. You mean _any_ relational database that uses SQL, since
    >> you
    >> would have named the product and the version you were using if you wanted
    >> a
    >> correct answer that applies to your situation.
    >>
    >> > and then import it into
    >> > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best.

    >>
    >> Most relational database engines have built-in utilities that make this
    >> as
    >> easy as snapping your fingers. If I knew which database engine you have,
    >> I
    >> could probably suggest the names of the utilities or techniques you
    >> should
    >> be using instead your cumbersome method.
    >>
    >> > If we were to connect directly into
    >> > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    >> > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    >> > Access?

    >>
    >> It depends upon the permissions granted to the users by the DBA.
    >> Permissions can be as restrictive or as generous as necessary. Also,
    >> some
    >> drivers for ODBC connections allow for "read-only" access, such as Jet
    >> does,
    >> so you may be able to limit this on your end with a DSN setting, if
    >> that's
    >> what you're looking for.
    >>
    >> > Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    >> > can hold.

    >>
    >> It only holds one record, if it's a really big record. In other words,
    >> it's
    >> the size that counts, not how many times you try.
    >>
    >> Which database engine are you using (and version or edition), what's the
    >> storage capacity of the hard drives, and how large can the files be on
    >> the
    >> partitions holding the data files, indexes, and log files? If you're
    >> wondering about maximum capacity and you are using Microsoft's SQL Server
    >> or
    >> Oracle's non-express editions, non-personal editions, or non-Standard
    >> edition, then if the hard drives and files sizes could handle it, the
    >> database could store several terabytes of data. That's probably more
    >> than
    >> enough. On the other hand, the free express editions will hold up to
    >> four
    >> Gigabytes of data, which is a suitable capacity for the most common
    >> database
    >> applications.
    >>
    >> HTH.
    >> Gunny
    >>
    >> See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    >> See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    >> http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    >> info.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:A74550E3-1FA3-4575-964E-C09F7F931867@microsoft.com...
    >> > We have a third party that houses our database. In order to run any
    >> > reports,
    >> > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB and then import it
    >> > into
    >> > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best. If we were to connect
    >> > directly
    >> > into
    >> > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    >> > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    >> > Access?
    >> >
    >> > This is a concern of management before giving any consideration to an
    >> > ODBC
    >> > connection.
    >> >
    >> > Side question: Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL
    >> > DB
    >> > can hold.
    >> > --
    >> > Gina

    >>
    >>
    >>
     
  7. Gina

    Gina
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Very - very - very - very helpful.

    Thank you much.
    --
    Gina


    "'69 Camaro" wrote:

    > Hi, Gina.
    >
    > PeopleSoft requires a relational database engine and can be supported by
    > Oracle, MS SQL Server, Sybase, DB2, Informix, and SQLBase, so you just need
    > to find out which one your organization is using. Talk to your DBA about
    > getting connected securely. That means _never_ storing the User ID and
    > password in an Access database to "make it easier on the user," as so many
    > Access developers think is a good idea. Access databases are the first
    > place hackers look, and find, login credentials for otherwise secure
    > client/server databases.
    >
    > However, with a user DSN set up on each workstation, Access can securely
    > connect to the database engine as long as the user supplies valid login
    > credentials to authenticate once per session.
    >
    > HTH.
    > Gunny
    >
    > See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    > See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    > http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    > info.
    >
    >
    > "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:D3D0F0D5-E3DB-4AEE-AFF7-8C356B9FA973@microsoft.com...
    > >I just looked up People Soft on the internet. It looks like People Soft is
    > > not SQL based as I had thought. It looks like its Oracle based. Sorry
    > > for
    > > the misconception.
    > > --
    > > Gina
    > >
    > >
    > > "'69 Camaro" wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hi, Gina.
    > >>
    > >> > In order to run any reports,
    > >> > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB
    > >>
    > >> SQL DB? Ah. Sybase SQL Server, the name of the relational database
    > >> before
    > >> Microsoft and Ashton-Tate ported it to Windows NT and Sybase renamed its
    > >> version to Adaptive Server Enterprise.
    > >>
    > >> Just kidding. You mean _any_ relational database that uses SQL, since
    > >> you
    > >> would have named the product and the version you were using if you wanted
    > >> a
    > >> correct answer that applies to your situation.
    > >>
    > >> > and then import it into
    > >> > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best.
    > >>
    > >> Most relational database engines have built-in utilities that make this
    > >> as
    > >> easy as snapping your fingers. If I knew which database engine you have,
    > >> I
    > >> could probably suggest the names of the utilities or techniques you
    > >> should
    > >> be using instead your cumbersome method.
    > >>
    > >> > If we were to connect directly into
    > >> > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    > >> > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    > >> > Access?
    > >>
    > >> It depends upon the permissions granted to the users by the DBA.
    > >> Permissions can be as restrictive or as generous as necessary. Also,
    > >> some
    > >> drivers for ODBC connections allow for "read-only" access, such as Jet
    > >> does,
    > >> so you may be able to limit this on your end with a DSN setting, if
    > >> that's
    > >> what you're looking for.
    > >>
    > >> > Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    > >> > can hold.
    > >>
    > >> It only holds one record, if it's a really big record. In other words,
    > >> it's
    > >> the size that counts, not how many times you try.
    > >>
    > >> Which database engine are you using (and version or edition), what's the
    > >> storage capacity of the hard drives, and how large can the files be on
    > >> the
    > >> partitions holding the data files, indexes, and log files? If you're
    > >> wondering about maximum capacity and you are using Microsoft's SQL Server
    > >> or
    > >> Oracle's non-express editions, non-personal editions, or non-Standard
    > >> edition, then if the hard drives and files sizes could handle it, the
    > >> database could store several terabytes of data. That's probably more
    > >> than
    > >> enough. On the other hand, the free express editions will hold up to
    > >> four
    > >> Gigabytes of data, which is a suitable capacity for the most common
    > >> database
    > >> applications.
    > >>
    > >> HTH.
    > >> Gunny
    > >>
    > >> See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    > >> See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    > >> http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    > >> info.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:A74550E3-1FA3-4575-964E-C09F7F931867@microsoft.com...
    > >> > We have a third party that houses our database. In order to run any
    > >> > reports,
    > >> > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB and then import it
    > >> > into
    > >> > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best. If we were to connect
    > >> > directly
    > >> > into
    > >> > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    > >> > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    > >> > Access?
    > >> >
    > >> > This is a concern of management before giving any consideration to an
    > >> > ODBC
    > >> > connection.
    > >> >
    > >> > Side question: Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL
    > >> > DB
    > >> > can hold.
    > >> > --
    > >> > Gina
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    >
    >
     
  8. '69 Camaro

    '69 Camaro
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Hi, Gina.

    > The application is People Soft. Although we can run queries in People
    > Soft
    > it takes forever and day to run them.


    If you're using PeopleSoft, then it's powered by an enterprise level
    relational database engine, which means that if you can get an expert DBA to
    work with the query designers, those queries will scream. :)

    > However, when we export the data and
    > then import it into ACCESS, we can run reports very easily.


    To be honest, I think you should be working with your DBA to optimize the
    queries so that they run in PeopleSoft, not in Access with a copy of the
    data. This is your DBA's area of expertise, and it's what your
    organization pays your DBA the big bucks to do.

    > I didn't see any reason why we
    > could not just connect directly into the DB through ACCESS using an ODBC
    > connection. However, as mentioned earlier, Managements concern was that
    > there would be no security.


    You can -- with a connection that requires the user to authenticate at the
    beginning of each session because the login credentials aren't stored in
    Access, as I described in one of my previous posts. However, only do this
    as a last resort if your DBA can't work with you to optimize the queries
    from within PeopleSoft.

    Good luck.
    Gunny

    See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    info.


    "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:2AD176F0-1718-41C6-AF34-91D51979A711@microsoft.com...
    > Thank you for your thorough response. You provided me with just the
    > information I needed. Additional details below.
    >
    > The application is People Soft. Although we can run queries in People
    > Soft
    > it takes forever and day to run them. However, when we export the data
    > and
    > then import it into ACCESS, we can run reports very easily. But again, we
    > are back to this daily export/import routine. I didn't see any reason why
    > we
    > could not just connect directly into the DB through ACCESS using an ODBC
    > connection. However, as mentioned earlier, Managements concern was that
    > there would be no security. I thought you should be able to put security
    > in
    > place, but I'm not the DBA. But as an Analyst, I'm used to just having
    > the
    > data at my fingertips.
    > --
    > Gina
    >
    >
    > "'69 Camaro" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi, Gina.
    >>
    >> > In order to run any reports,
    >> > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB

    >>
    >> SQL DB? Ah. Sybase SQL Server, the name of the relational database
    >> before
    >> Microsoft and Ashton-Tate ported it to Windows NT and Sybase renamed its
    >> version to Adaptive Server Enterprise.
    >>
    >> Just kidding. You mean _any_ relational database that uses SQL, since
    >> you
    >> would have named the product and the version you were using if you wanted
    >> a
    >> correct answer that applies to your situation.
    >>
    >> > and then import it into
    >> > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best.

    >>
    >> Most relational database engines have built-in utilities that make this
    >> as
    >> easy as snapping your fingers. If I knew which database engine you have,
    >> I
    >> could probably suggest the names of the utilities or techniques you
    >> should
    >> be using instead your cumbersome method.
    >>
    >> > If we were to connect directly into
    >> > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    >> > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    >> > Access?

    >>
    >> It depends upon the permissions granted to the users by the DBA.
    >> Permissions can be as restrictive or as generous as necessary. Also,
    >> some
    >> drivers for ODBC connections allow for "read-only" access, such as Jet
    >> does,
    >> so you may be able to limit this on your end with a DSN setting, if
    >> that's
    >> what you're looking for.
    >>
    >> > Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL DB
    >> > can hold.

    >>
    >> It only holds one record, if it's a really big record. In other words,
    >> it's
    >> the size that counts, not how many times you try.
    >>
    >> Which database engine are you using (and version or edition), what's the
    >> storage capacity of the hard drives, and how large can the files be on
    >> the
    >> partitions holding the data files, indexes, and log files? If you're
    >> wondering about maximum capacity and you are using Microsoft's SQL Server
    >> or
    >> Oracle's non-express editions, non-personal editions, or non-Standard
    >> edition, then if the hard drives and files sizes could handle it, the
    >> database could store several terabytes of data. That's probably more
    >> than
    >> enough. On the other hand, the free express editions will hold up to
    >> four
    >> Gigabytes of data, which is a suitable capacity for the most common
    >> database
    >> applications.
    >>
    >> HTH.
    >> Gunny
    >>
    >> See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    >> See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    >> http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    >> info.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Gina" <Gina@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:A74550E3-1FA3-4575-964E-C09F7F931867@microsoft.com...
    >> > We have a third party that houses our database. In order to run any
    >> > reports,
    >> > it is necessary to export the data from the SQL DB and then import it
    >> > into
    >> > Access (Daily). Very cumbersum at best. If we were to connect
    >> > directly
    >> > into
    >> > the SQL DB from Access, would we just have 'read only' ability or would
    >> > anyone connected in be able to actually change the raw data through
    >> > Access?
    >> >
    >> > This is a concern of management before giving any consideration to an
    >> > ODBC
    >> > connection.
    >> >
    >> > Side question: Does anyone just happen to know how many records a SQL
    >> > DB
    >> > can hold.
    >> > --
    >> > Gina

    >>
    >>
    >>
     

Share This Page