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Microsft Access style replacement for Enterprise Manger.

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Revus, Nov 8, 2005.

  1. Revus

    Revus
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    Guest

    Can Microsoft Access Wizards be used to create SQL Server Views and Stored
    Procedures?
     
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  3. Larry Linson

    Larry Linson
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    Guest

    "Revus" wrote

    > Can Microsoft Access Wizards be used to
    > create SQL Server Views and Stored
    > Procedures?


    None of the wizards that come with Access do this. But, you can write a
    Wizard to do most anything you want... Wizards are just Forms and Code,
    usually packaged in a library MDE. I don't think I would be so bold as to
    think that I could easily create a better Enterprise Manager. If you can,
    you might have a very salable item.

    Some complications include necessary permissions for the user, and moving a
    constructed text stream from Access into a SQL Server View or Stored
    Procedure from the Wizard. But those, I would judge, are problems that can
    be solved.

    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Access MVP
     
  4. Albert D.Kallal

    Albert D.Kallal
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    Guest

    "Revus" <Revus @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:A9013FB9-9D7E-429D-A23E-2725A56F2385@microsoft.com...
    > Can Microsoft Access Wizards be used to create SQL Server Views and Stored
    > Procedures?


    Hum, you might want to clarify the above. Do you mean can you use
    ms-access, and will ms-access create the tables and views on sql server?
    (yes, you can do this). You just need to create what is called a adp
    project.

    Or, are you asking can you do this without sql server?

    The answer here is sort of, since you can use the create-view command here
    (but, it is kind of moot when you use it with jet, since any select query is
    essentially the same as a view anyway).


    --
    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    pleaseNOOSpamKallal@msn.com
    http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
     
  5. Brendan Reynolds

    Brendan Reynolds
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    Guest

    I find that an Access 2003 ADP is a useful additional tool, alongside
    Enterprise Manager, but not a replacement. For example, I will often use an
    ADP to initially create a stored procedure, but then I will switch to
    Enterprise Manager to assign the necessary permissions on that stored
    procedure.

    Here's a link to the Access 2003 on-line help topic on creating views and
    stored procedures in an ADP.

    --
    Brendan Reynolds

    "Revus" <Revus @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:A9013FB9-9D7E-429D-A23E-2725A56F2385@microsoft.com...
    > Can Microsoft Access Wizards be used to create SQL Server Views and Stored
    > Procedures?
     
  6. Guest

    Guest
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    > I don't think I would be so bold as to
    > think that I could easily create a better Enterprise Manager.
    > If you can, you might have a very salable item.


    If you do, you should read the Microsoft EULA carefully
    and see if you fall within the competing product provisions. :~)

    (david)


    "Larry Linson" <bouncer@localhost.not> wrote in message
    news:uRvMPHB5FHA.884@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > "Revus" wrote
    >
    > > Can Microsoft Access Wizards be used to
    > > create SQL Server Views and Stored
    > > Procedures?

    >
    > None of the wizards that come with Access do this. But, you can write a
    > Wizard to do most anything you want... Wizards are just Forms and Code,
    > usually packaged in a library MDE. I don't think I would be so bold as to
    > think that I could easily create a better Enterprise Manager. If you can,
    > you might have a very salable item.
    >
    > Some complications include necessary permissions for the user, and moving

    a
    > constructed text stream from Access into a SQL Server View or Stored
    > Procedure from the Wizard. But those, I would judge, are problems that can
    > be solved.
    >
    > Larry Linson
    > Microsoft Access MVP
    >
    >
     
  7. Revus

    Revus
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    Guest

    Thank you David.

    I am contemplating building a web-based tool in Microsft .NET that could
    replace Enterprise Manager, but has the look and feel of Microsoft Access.
    A tool that uses Wizards to build Views.
    Also, something that can take advantage of the new SQL Server Yukon feature
    of coding Stored procedures utilizing VB, C# and Transact-SQL together.
    There are many other features I want to incorporate in this web-based tool,
    but I am sure you get the idea.

    I will review the Microsoft EULA carefully. Thanks!

    "david@epsomdotcomdotau" wrote:

    > > I don't think I would be so bold as to
    > > think that I could easily create a better Enterprise Manager.
    > > If you can, you might have a very salable item.

    >
    > If you do, you should read the Microsoft EULA carefully
    > and see if you fall within the competing product provisions. :~)
    >
    > (david)
    >
    >
    > "Larry Linson" <bouncer@localhost.not> wrote in message
    > news:uRvMPHB5FHA.884@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > > "Revus" wrote
    > >
    > > > Can Microsoft Access Wizards be used to
    > > > create SQL Server Views and Stored
    > > > Procedures?

    > >
    > > None of the wizards that come with Access do this. But, you can write a
    > > Wizard to do most anything you want... Wizards are just Forms and Code,
    > > usually packaged in a library MDE. I don't think I would be so bold as to
    > > think that I could easily create a better Enterprise Manager. If you can,
    > > you might have a very salable item.
    > >
    > > Some complications include necessary permissions for the user, and moving

    > a
    > > constructed text stream from Access into a SQL Server View or Stored
    > > Procedure from the Wizard. But those, I would judge, are problems that can
    > > be solved.
    > >
    > > Larry Linson
    > > Microsoft Access MVP
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
     

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