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Making application for use on computers without Access

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Karl H, Oct 27, 2005.

  1. Karl H

    Karl H
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Hi,
    I made an mde file, hoping it could be used by folks without Access. It
    doesn't look like that's possible. Is there another way to convert the mda
    file to a format that can be opened and used by others who may not have MS
    Access on their computer?

    Thank you,
    Karl
     
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  3. '69 Camaro

    '69 Camaro
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Hi, Karl.

    An Access database (MDB, MDE, or MDB) requires Access to be installed in
    order to use the Access objects, such as forms, reports and modules.
    However, the data in the tables in the database file can be accessed through
    virtually any data access method from another application.

    If the user doesn't have Access installed, then the Runtime version can be
    installed, but that requires a Runtime license. The unlimited Runtime
    license is included in the developer version of Office that allows one to
    install the Access Runtime on other computers that don't have the retail
    version of Microsoft Access or Microsoft Office Professional installed.

    The developer version of Microsoft Office 2003 that includes this Runtime
    license is the Access Developer Extensions (ADE), which are included in only
    the standalone version of Visual Studio Tools for Office 2003 (VSTO) or with
    the VSTO in the Universal version of the MSDN subscription. Either Microsoft
    Office Access 2003 or Microsoft Office 2003 Professional is required to be
    installed on the developer's computer before the Access Developer Extensions
    are installed.

    If you do choose to purchase the 2003 version, keep in mind that the
    operating system must be Windows 2K SP-3 or above or Windows XP. No earlier
    version of Windows will be able to run Office 2003, due to the .Net
    framework requirements.

    If you choose to purchase an earlier version of the Office Developer
    edition, keep in mind that those versions are not the current version of
    Office, and may be difficult to find. You may be able to find a bargain in
    an eBay online auction, at http://www.eBay.com, or one of the online used
    software vendors might have the older versions of Microsoft Office Developer
    for sale. Check any of the following for current availability and prices:

    http://www.emsps.com/oldtools/msacc.htm
    http://www.emsps.com/oldtools/msoff.htm
    http://www.recycledsoftware.com/pricelst.htm#115
    http://www.software-xchange.com

    Much more work is involved in producing a Runtime version of an application
    than is required for the average Access database application, since it must
    be more robust and often needs some of the features that are only available
    in the retail version of Access. The extra time involved is often not
    cost-effective, unless there are a lot of users of the Access database
    application that you are building. A general rule of thumb is that the labor
    costs of the professional developer's extra time to produce the Runtime
    version is equivalent to the cost of about 10 to 15 retail licenses for
    Access. If you are not a professional developer, then you may want to
    calculate the break-even point a little -- or a lot -- higher than this,
    depending upon your experience level.

    HTH.
    Gunny

    See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips.

    (Please remove ZERO_SPAM from my reply E-mail address so that a message will
    be forwarded to me.)
    - - -
    If my answer has helped you, please sign in and answer yes to the question
    "Did this post answer your question?" at the bottom of the message, which
    adds your question and the answers to the database of answers. Remember that
    questions answered the quickest are often from those who have a history of
    rewarding the contributors who have taken the time to answer questions
    correctly.


    "Karl H" wrote:

    > Hi,
    > I made an mde file, hoping it could be used by folks without Access. It
    > doesn't look like that's possible. Is there another way to convert the mda
    > file to a format that can be opened and used by others who may not have MS
    > Access on their computer?
    >
    > Thank you,
    > Karl
     
  4. Wayne Morgan

    Wayne Morgan
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    There is a runtime version of Access. Depending on your version of Access,
    the package you need has different names. It goes by "Developer Edition" or
    for 2003 "Access Developer Extensions" which, I believe, comes as part of
    "Visual Studio Tools for Office 2003".

    --
    Wayne Morgan
    MS Access MVP


    "Karl H" <KarlH@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:52CDEC28-A899-490A-9C30-E1BB303A58B5@microsoft.com...
    > Hi,
    > I made an mde file, hoping it could be used by folks without Access. It
    > doesn't look like that's possible. Is there another way to convert the mda
    > file to a format that can be opened and used by others who may not have MS
    > Access on their computer?
    >
    > Thank you,
    > Karl
     
  5. Fred Boer

    Fred Boer
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    [OT] Re: Making application for use on computers without Access

    Dear Gunny:

    I was sitting here for some time trying to compose an answer to this
    question. I'd spent more minutes than I care to mention on the Microsoft
    website, just trying to confirm what exactly corresponded to the "Access
    Developer's Edition". Eventually I gave up, and, coming back from
    Microsoft.com, saw you had posted a clear, concise and informative answer.

    Next time, I'll just cut and paste your answer! <g>

    Cheers,
    Fred Boer


    "'69 Camaro" <ForwardZERO_SPAM.To.69Camaro@Spameater.orgZERO_SPAM> wrote in
    message news:CEB2F618-A5E6-4318-8C5E-34668F2AC2B8@microsoft.com...
    > Hi, Karl.
    >
    > An Access database (MDB, MDE, or MDB) requires Access to be installed in
    > order to use the Access objects, such as forms, reports and modules.
    > However, the data in the tables in the database file can be accessed
    > through
    > virtually any data access method from another application.
    >
    > If the user doesn't have Access installed, then the Runtime version can be
    > installed, but that requires a Runtime license. The unlimited Runtime
    > license is included in the developer version of Office that allows one to
    > install the Access Runtime on other computers that don't have the retail
    > version of Microsoft Access or Microsoft Office Professional installed.
    >
    > The developer version of Microsoft Office 2003 that includes this Runtime
    > license is the Access Developer Extensions (ADE), which are included in
    > only
    > the standalone version of Visual Studio Tools for Office 2003 (VSTO) or
    > with
    > the VSTO in the Universal version of the MSDN subscription. Either
    > Microsoft
    > Office Access 2003 or Microsoft Office 2003 Professional is required to be
    > installed on the developer's computer before the Access Developer
    > Extensions
    > are installed.
    >
    > If you do choose to purchase the 2003 version, keep in mind that the
    > operating system must be Windows 2K SP-3 or above or Windows XP. No
    > earlier
    > version of Windows will be able to run Office 2003, due to the .Net
    > framework requirements.
    >
    > If you choose to purchase an earlier version of the Office Developer
    > edition, keep in mind that those versions are not the current version of
    > Office, and may be difficult to find. You may be able to find a bargain
    > in
    > an eBay online auction, at http://www.eBay.com, or one of the online used
    > software vendors might have the older versions of Microsoft Office
    > Developer
    > for sale. Check any of the following for current availability and prices:
    >
    > http://www.emsps.com/oldtools/msacc.htm
    > http://www.emsps.com/oldtools/msoff.htm
    > http://www.recycledsoftware.com/pricelst.htm#115
    > http://www.software-xchange.com
    >
    > Much more work is involved in producing a Runtime version of an
    > application
    > than is required for the average Access database application, since it
    > must
    > be more robust and often needs some of the features that are only
    > available
    > in the retail version of Access. The extra time involved is often not
    > cost-effective, unless there are a lot of users of the Access database
    > application that you are building. A general rule of thumb is that the
    > labor
    > costs of the professional developer's extra time to produce the Runtime
    > version is equivalent to the cost of about 10 to 15 retail licenses for
    > Access. If you are not a professional developer, then you may want to
    > calculate the break-even point a little -- or a lot -- higher than this,
    > depending upon your experience level.
    >
    > HTH.
    > Gunny
    >
    > See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    > See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips.
    >
    > (Please remove ZERO_SPAM from my reply E-mail address so that a message
    > will
    > be forwarded to me.)
    > - - -
    > If my answer has helped you, please sign in and answer yes to the question
    > "Did this post answer your question?" at the bottom of the message, which
    > adds your question and the answers to the database of answers. Remember
    > that
    > questions answered the quickest are often from those who have a history of
    > rewarding the contributors who have taken the time to answer questions
    > correctly.
    >
    >
    > "Karl H" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >> I made an mde file, hoping it could be used by folks without Access. It
    >> doesn't look like that's possible. Is there another way to convert the
    >> mda
    >> file to a format that can be opened and used by others who may not have
    >> MS
    >> Access on their computer?
    >>
    >> Thank you,
    >> Karl
     
  6. Dirk Goldgar

    Dirk Goldgar
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Re: [OT] Re: Making application for use on computers without Access

    "Fred Boer" <fredboer1@NOyahooSPAM.com> wrote in message
    news:%23rjW5fl2FHA.2492@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl
    > Dear Gunny:
    >
    > I was sitting here for some time trying to compose an answer to this
    > question. I'd spent more minutes than I care to mention on the
    > Microsoft website, just trying to confirm what exactly corresponded
    > to the "Access Developer's Edition". Eventually I gave up, and,
    > coming back from Microsoft.com, saw you had posted a clear, concise
    > and informative answer.
    >
    > Next time, I'll just cut and paste your answer! <g>


    Agreed, Fred. I don't think Gunny's answer could be improved in any
    way.

    --
    Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    www.datagnostics.com

    (please reply to the newsgroup)
     
  7. '69 Camaro

    '69 Camaro
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Re: [OT] Re: Making application for use on computers without Access

    Guys, I just pasted it in from an earlier message of mine and added a new
    paragraph. That earlier message was just pasted in from an even earlier
    message of mine with a new paragraph added. And that even earlier message
    was pasted from two earlier messages of mine (and probably with a new
    paragraph added back then, too).

    I suppose that this is a signal that I should stop adding new paragraphs.
    ;-)

    >> Next time, I'll just cut and paste your answer! <g>


    Go ahead, Fred! I should take your advice, too!

    Gunny

    See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips.


    "Dirk Goldgar" <dg@NOdataSPAMgnostics.com> wrote in message
    news:%234Blrjl2FHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > "Fred Boer" <fredboer1@NOyahooSPAM.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23rjW5fl2FHA.2492@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl
    >> Dear Gunny:
    >>
    >> I was sitting here for some time trying to compose an answer to this
    >> question. I'd spent more minutes than I care to mention on the
    >> Microsoft website, just trying to confirm what exactly corresponded
    >> to the "Access Developer's Edition". Eventually I gave up, and,
    >> coming back from Microsoft.com, saw you had posted a clear, concise
    >> and informative answer.
    >>
    >> Next time, I'll just cut and paste your answer! <g>

    >
    > Agreed, Fred. I don't think Gunny's answer could be improved in any
    > way.
    >
    > --
    > Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    > www.datagnostics.com
    >
    > (please reply to the newsgroup)
    >
    >
     
  8. George Nicholson

    George Nicholson
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Re: [OT] Re: Making application for use on computers without Access

    Practice makes perfect, I guess <g>

    --
    George Nicholson

    Remove 'Junk' from return address.


    "'69 Camaro" <ForwardZERO_SPAM.To.69Camaro@Spameater.orgZERO_SPAM> wrote in
    message news:u$8J2km2FHA.3744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Guys, I just pasted it in from an earlier message of mine and added a new
    > paragraph. That earlier message was just pasted in from an even earlier
    > message of mine with a new paragraph added. And that even earlier message
    > was pasted from two earlier messages of mine (and probably with a new
    > paragraph added back then, too).
    >
    > I suppose that this is a signal that I should stop adding new paragraphs.
    > ;-)
    >
    >>> Next time, I'll just cut and paste your answer! <g>

    >
    > Go ahead, Fred! I should take your advice, too!
    >
    > Gunny
    >
    > See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    > See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips.
    >
    >
    > "Dirk Goldgar" <dg@NOdataSPAMgnostics.com> wrote in message
    > news:%234Blrjl2FHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> "Fred Boer" <fredboer1@NOyahooSPAM.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23rjW5fl2FHA.2492@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl
    >>> Dear Gunny:
    >>>
    >>> I was sitting here for some time trying to compose an answer to this
    >>> question. I'd spent more minutes than I care to mention on the
    >>> Microsoft website, just trying to confirm what exactly corresponded
    >>> to the "Access Developer's Edition". Eventually I gave up, and,
    >>> coming back from Microsoft.com, saw you had posted a clear, concise
    >>> and informative answer.
    >>>
    >>> Next time, I'll just cut and paste your answer! <g>

    >>
    >> Agreed, Fred. I don't think Gunny's answer could be improved in any
    >> way.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    >> www.datagnostics.com
    >>
    >> (please reply to the newsgroup)
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
  9. Karl

    Karl
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Dear Gunny,
    Thank you for your helpful response. I'll check into prices of the software
    you mentioned, and also review how to pull Access into VB.net, which I've
    studied a bit.
    Yours,
    Karl H
     
  10. '69 Camaro

    '69 Camaro
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    You're welcome!

    Good luck.
    Gunny

    See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips.


    "Karl" <Karl@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:FF54D604-CBEB-46F7-9523-4CEADAB1D3EF@microsoft.com...
    >
    > Dear Gunny,
    > Thank you for your helpful response. I'll check into prices of the
    > software
    > you mentioned, and also review how to pull Access into VB.net, which I've
    > studied a bit.
    > Yours,
    > Karl H
     

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