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I am five years old at the age of 48

Discussion in 'Inspirational Stories' started by kds1980, May 9, 2009.

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  1. kds1980

    kds1980 India
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    I am five years old at the age of 48
    May 7th, 2009 by Jaspal Singh

    I have now lived 48 years, but my age should actually be five, as as this is my second lifetime in this birth.

    In those critical moments I just could remember the nursing home where my son was born; I was made to wait outside the police chowky in the platform. A gentleman came out from the onlookers and asked me to take care of myself (as per him the police was waiting for me to die - ‘dum todne ka intezaar kar rahe hain”)

    “Sardar, aaj tu gaya” were the last words I heard before they pushed me off the running train as it was negotiating a bend between Borivali and Kandivali. The spot was just before the ‘khayi’ – I should actually have fallen into the water. There would have been no trace of me. January 30, 2004 was the fateful day.

    I am an Aircraft Maintenance Engineer and there was a flight in the next one hour and I was to clear the helicopter for takeoff. I was proceeding to Juhu airfield. I boarded the train at Borivali – for an early morning train it was pretty crowded and I was keen to catch the train – there was no willingness to yield on the part of those standing at the threshold. I literally begged them to let me board but no one even moved an inch. Short of touching their feet in salutation, I asked them again to let me enter. As the train was about to start, one amongst them moved a bit and permitted me to board.

    This was not appreciated by the others and they started jostling. My left hand was firmly gripping the door handle. The pushing increased as the train was accelerating. I requested them to let me go inside at least but they were quite unwilling. That was the time I heard one of them utter “you’re gone today” and I fell off the train.

    My turban saved me from death

    I knew immediately that I was deeply hurt. My white uniform shirt was soaked in fresh blood. I was also aware that the next train would be along any minute. I tried to scramble but I could not move. I was happy to see a few labourers working on the rail tracks. They were so scared to come near me that it took them some time to realise that I was not dead! I pleaded with them to use my turban as a bandage over my head, which they did. They also stopped the inbound train. The motorman was a Sikh gentleman. I do not know his name even today, but he was so considerate that not only did he pick me up from that spot but he also dropped me off at Borivali, right in front of the Police chowky – in the safe hands of the police.

    I landed up in a maternity home with my head split into two and blood flowing like water

    After the gentleman warned me outside the police chowky on the Borivali platform I was surely in a daze. I slowly got up and I asked the police whether I could use their office telephone. The policeman on duty was rather nasty in telling me that the telephone was unusable and that outgoing calls were not possible, but he was kind enough to give me a one rupee coin for a call from the nearby public booth.

    Someone led me to the nearest telephone. I called my wife and told her to come over to the Indira Nursing Home at Mira Road where our son was born. I went out and looked for an auto rickshaw – many refused to stop, but one of them was kind enough to take me. He stopped his rickshaw at Dahisar toll naka - the city border, took me across the naka, and put me on another rickshaw to take me to Mira Road.

    The rest was truly a rebirth. I passed out as soon as I saw the familiar faces of Dr. Madhu Vyas and her doctor husband Dr. Rakesh Vyas. Over the next two months the wound not only healed well, but but I was even able to return to my regular duty as well.

    Keeping cool and retaining my presence of mind, even under those nightmarish circumstances, came to me spontaneously as a result of the safety drills I followed as an aviator.

    Now, the magical figure of a half-century of life is approaching. Today I am enjoying the company of my near and dear ones while enjoying the luxury of a second life given to me by my Guru because of my PAGDI.

    My beloved GURU's gift of my Dastar protected my head better than a helmet and it served as a bandage around my injured head. It is all possible because of lovely blessings of almighty Waheguru. Yama, the fearful god of death, had a hearty laugh at me.


    Dhan Guru Nanak Dev Ji!
     
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  3. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Every so often newspaper obituaries show YOUNG SIKH MEN....as..passed away suddenly...
    reason..small PATKA on head used in place of Full Turban while riding high speed motocycles on highways that have so high traffic . The Patka 'is "legal" as SIKH with TURBAN is exempted from Helmet rule...but what many dont know is the PATKA KILLS as it affords no protection whatsoever to the head unlike a DASTAAR tied frimly and of full length.
    OF course my "clean shaven" friends on SPN will say all this is utter rubbish...blah balh..but let them ask those who were saved by their DASTAARS. My own dad was !!
     
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  4. spnadmin

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    Gyani ji

    What is that story? It fits perfectly in this thread.
    :welcome:
     
  5. Hardip Singh

    Hardip Singh India
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    Gyani jee,
    How about the safety of our females.
    If it is taboo to wear any safety helmet than as per this true storey our males are safe. What my beloved sisters, mothers and other Gursikh ladies will wear. Are we not exposing our females to certain death in case of any road accidents ??????
     
  6. pk70

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    Their statements actually are proven rubbish, story above is coming out of experience:)



    Regards
    G singh
     
  7. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Guru Piayario Jio,
    Hardeep Singh Ji,
    Gurfateh.

    The DASTAAR is mandatory for ALL Sikhs...no distinction is made between the Genders.
    People have invented excuses for not wearing one....the CSS (clean shaven ones) have theirs and the long haired Females have theirs...thats Personal CHOICE..not Rehat.

    My late mother Gyani Gurcharan kaur ji always wore a dastaar and she "annoyed" a muslim policeman who lived in our enighbourhood. ( over agardenign matter )....so he would wait for her to come riding her motorcycle and issue her a ticket fro not wearing a helmet. Mum would go to see his superior..who would cite the Law..Male Sikh wearing dastaar exempted from helmet law. She would argue I am a SIKH..the word "male" is wrongly inserted...it doesnt say a FEMALE SIKH is not allowed to wear a dastaar ??? SO ?? The Oficer would cancel the ticket...but refuse to admonish the policeman as he was also acting within the Law....this cat and mouse went on for nearly a decade. The original mistake in drafting the Dastaar exemption Law was indeed made by the SIKHS themsleves who put in the word MALE SIKH...and just accepted that Female Sikhs DONT wear dastaars !! talk about cutting ones own feet !! My mums problems went away only when the neighbour was transferred out.

    SIKHI/GURMATT is EQUAL and accords same equal rights and responsibilities to ALL - male and female alike. Those Sikh females who dont wear dastaar expose themsleves to risks on their own accord.
     
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  8. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Aad Ji,
    My dads strory is not that "exciting".
    It was late at night...it was raining heavily.
    Dad was riding his bicycle and carrying a pillion sikh who was a mona.
    A high speed car came from behind...knocking into the bicycle.
    Both were thrown off and smashed head long into the cars windscreen.
    MY dads dastaar remained firmly on his head protecting his head and face form serious injury...the mona had huge cuts on his scalp and face as he went through the glass...needed about 50 stiches.
    My dad although much heavier and stocky escaped all injuries..just minor scratches. imho...The Dastaar made th Hole bigger for dads head to go through the glass......while the monas head scraped through....and got cut all over.:happy::happy::happy::happy::happy:
     
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  9. spnadmin

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    Gyani ji

    I think the story is amazing... just think of what you are saying :wah:The story about your mother Gyani also -- incredible. She was a handful. Nothing frightened her did it? We want MORE stories about your mother and your father. :yes::yes::yes::yes::yes:
     
  10. Hardip Singh

    Hardip Singh India
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    Respected Gyanni jee,
    Guru fateh.
    Thanks for your information. One more strange thing I will like to bring to the notice of all readers of this forum; that after reading this particular article and your further comments I tried to check this with some of my Gursikh friends with the Delhi Traffic Police. The information was stunning one. They said as per law they had made it mandatory for sikh females to either have dastaars or wear safety helmets while driving and even pillion riding. But it was due to stiff oposition from the Delhi Gurudwara commitee members that they had to withdraw this provision. Even if they had challaned any sikh female for not adhering to the law, the commitee paid the fines levied on those females from the Gurudwara accounts.
    How strange it is. Our great Gurus had provided us the basic safety on our heads centuries before but I do not know why we are letting are females to suffer on account of this.
     

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