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How do I find how much disk space each database object uses?

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Sunbury Ed, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Sunbury Ed

    Sunbury Ed
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    Guest

    I am on Access 2000. I have a database that, even after clearing out a number
    of the biggest tables and then compacting it, is still at 500Mb. While there
    are several temporary tables still in it which are quite large I can't see
    why it is using this much memory so I'm keen to find a way to investigate
    what exactly is causing this.
     
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  3. Allen Browne

    Allen Browne
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    Guest

    There is no published way to determine how much memory each object is using,
    but there are several things you can do to cut back the wasted memory.

    1. Remove any graphics embedded in the database: backgrounds on forms, logos
    on reports, etc. Instead, use an Image control on your form/report, and set
    its Picture property in the Open event of the form/report. (Presumably you
    have already dealt with any OLE Object fields in your tables.)

    2. Uncheck the boxes under:
    Tools | Options | General | Name AutoCorrect

    Then compact the database to get rid of this junk:
    Tools | Database Utilities | Compact
    This misfeature wastes considerable space, and causes other problems:
    http://allenbrowne.com/bug-03.html

    3. Close Access. Make a backup copy of the file. Decompile the database by
    entering something like this at the command prompt while Access is not
    running. It is all one line, and include the quotes:
    "c:\Program Files\Microsoft office\office\msaccess.exe" /decompile
    "c:\MyPath\MyDatabase.mdb"
    Then open Access, and compact again.
    This dumps any spurious binary that may be present.

    4. Create a new (blank) database.
    Turn off Name AutoCorrect.
    Import everything from the old database.

    --
    Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
    Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
    Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

    "Sunbury Ed" <Sunbury Ed@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:DCCF9F8C-13A4-4DA0-91A2-5F9B77BEE454@microsoft.com...
    >I am on Access 2000. I have a database that, even after clearing out a
    >number
    > of the biggest tables and then compacting it, is still at 500Mb. While
    > there
    > are several temporary tables still in it which are quite large I can't see
    > why it is using this much memory so I'm keen to find a way to investigate
    > what exactly is causing this.
     
  4. Larry Linson

    Larry Linson
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    Guest

    "Sunbury Ed" wrote

    >I am on Access 2000. I have a database that, even after clearing out a
    >number
    > of the biggest tables and then compacting it, is still at 500Mb. While
    > there
    > are several temporary tables still in it which are quite large I can't see
    > why it is using this much memory so I'm keen to find a way to investigate
    > what exactly is causing this.


    You can create a temporary database to contain the temporary tables, and
    delete it when you are through with the temporary data. That will keep your
    production database from bloating because of the temp tables. I believe
    there's an example at MVP Tony Toews' site,
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm. But if my memory fails me on that
    reference, look in VBA Help for CREATE DATABASE. What I have found
    convenient is to manually create "template tables" in my main database,
    devoid of any data, and copy them to the newly-created temp database using
    the COPYOBJECT statement.

    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Access MVP
     
  5. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews
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    Guest

    Sunbury Ed <Sunbury Ed@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >I am on Access 2000. I have a database that, even after clearing out a number
    >of the biggest tables and then compacting it, is still at 500Mb. While there
    >are several temporary tables still in it which are quite large I can't see
    >why it is using this much memory so I'm keen to find a way to investigate
    >what exactly is causing this.


    You could try importing all the objects and relationships into a new
    MDB to see if that helps clean up things. But that's unlikely to make
    any significant difference on a 500 Mb MDB.

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     

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