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Forms for entering data

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by KBV, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. KBV

    KBV
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    Guest

    If forms are primarily used to enter or view data in a table, can I get an
    example of time that I would use a form in conjunction with a query?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. John Vinson

    John Vinson
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    Guest

    On Tue, 4 Jul 2006 14:15:02 -0700, KBV <KBV@discussions.microsoft.com>
    wrote:

    >If forms are primarily used to enter or view data in a table, can I get an
    >example of time that I would use a form in conjunction with a query?


    You can base a Form on a Query in exactly the same way, and just as
    easily, as you can base it on a Table. This is a very common thing to
    do if you want to have the Form display a subset of the data, and/or
    to display the data in a particular sort order.

    The data is in fact *stored* in the Table - but generally will be
    accessed via a Query.

    John W. Vinson[MVP]
     
  4. Graham Mandeno

    Graham Mandeno
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    Guest

    A query simply presents a view of the data in your table or tables. You can
    base a form on a query in just the same way as you do with a table. The
    major advantage of using a query rather than a table for a form's record
    source is that you can include fields from multiple related tables.

    For example, in the Northwind sample database, in the Orders table there is
    no information about the customer who placed the order, but only a single
    field containing the CustomerID. This field is related to the primary key
    field of the Customers table. If you created a form based on the Orders
    table, you would be able to see the date of the order, and the delivery
    status and so on, but you would not be able to see the name of the customer,
    or their address or phone number, or other customer details.

    So, you can make a query which selects fields from both these tables. A
    form based on this query would enable you to display Orders fields and
    Customers fields on the same form.
    --
    Good Luck!

    Graham Mandeno [Access MVP]
    Auckland, New Zealand


    "KBV" <KBV@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:55F20C78-4774-4B4E-A9E8-2685C7C1DBF8@microsoft.com...
    > If forms are primarily used to enter or view data in a table, can I get an
    > example of time that I would use a form in conjunction with a query?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
     
  5. Larry Linson

    Larry Linson
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    Guest

    "KBV" <KBV@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote

    > If forms are primarily used to enter or view
    > data in a table, can I get an example of time
    > that I would use a form in conjunction with
    > a query?


    First, Forms can be used for many purposes, including control of work to be
    done in an application, for example, the Forms in a Switchboard, or a Form
    that allows the user to specify various criteria used to select Records that
    are to be included in a Report. I agree that Forms are most often used to
    enter, edit, delete, or view Records, and that all Access Records are, by
    definition, stored in a Table, unless they come from a Query.

    Secondly, unlike some (many?) databases, Access/Jet has many Queries that
    allow updating of the underlying data. (In VBA Recordset/Programming lingo,
    they are "dynasets".) Queries are the only way (via inclusion of criteria,
    WHERE or HAVING clauses) to select particular Records to be shown in Forms
    or Reports and the only way to retrieve Records in a particular order (by
    specifying sort Fields, or including an SQL ORDER BY clause).

    Thus, using a Query as the RecordSource for a Form allows a great deal of
    flexibility in choosing which Records need be retrieved or stored. It is
    very interesting to note how often the user should only be presented with
    one record (if it exists) or none (if the pertinent record does not exist).

    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Access MVP
     

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